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Course Descriptions

[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
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21st Century Law Practice (1)
537B
Concentration(s):
This course provides students with an overview of the practice challenges facing lawyers in the 21st century, including economic pressures, technological advancements, increased globalization, international deregulation, and access to justice concerns. Building upon this background, the course will then explore a set of case studies to examine a variety of innovative new legal services delivery mechanisms and businesses in the US and the UK, such as Axiom, LegalZoom, QualitySolicitors, and others that have been created in anticipation of (or in some cases in response to) these practice challenges. Students will critically assess these legal service providers, and will reflect upon how lawyers and regulators should respond.
Prerequisite(s):

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Accounting for Lawyers (2)
502
Concentration(s):Corporate Law
(Formerly DCL 508)
Accounting for Lawyers covers the basic topics in accounting that are relevant to a business lawyer's practice and to other practice areas as well. The class covers principles of double-entry bookkeeping and accrual accounting, GAAP and GAAS. The basic financial statements are studied and basic financial statement analysis is reviewed. More detailed analysis is made of revenue recognition and expense, contingencies and intangibles. Finally, drafting of legal documents using accounting concepts is explored. This course is designed for those students with little or no prior accounting training or experience.

Prerequisite(s):

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Administrative Law (3)
532
Concentration(s):Env., Health, Intell Prop
(Formerly DCL 300)
This course examines the place of administrative agencies in American government, and surveys the legal rules and principles governing agency regulation, adjudication, investigation, and enforcement; agency structure; and judicial review of agency action.
Prerequisite(s):

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Administrative Law: Food Safety and Labeling (2)
810K
Concentration(s):
Administrative law is the body of constitutional, statutory, and common law principles that both constrain and seek to legitimize the exercise of powers by governmental agencies. The history of food safety and labeling regulations in the United States begins in the late 1800s and continues through present day, culminating recently in the 2011 enactment of the Food Safety Modernization Act, which creates a new system of federal oversight of domestically produced and imported food products. This course introduces students to the essential elements of administrative law and follows the basic structure of an administrative law course, but diverges from the traditional study by using cases and problems that are specific to food safety and food labeling issues in the United States. The primary goal of the class is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamental administrative law principles applied in matters involving the regulation of food and food products, and the ability to apply these principles to problems similar to those encountered in actual practice. To the extent possible, this class will be taught from a practice-oriented approach, requiring students to engage in problem-solving exercises online.
Prerequisite(s):

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Admiralty Law (3)
547
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 305)
This course will provide an overview of Admiralty law and jurisdiction, with special emphasis on issues related to maritime personal injury, collision, carriage of goods by sea and the creation and enforcement of maritime liens. Attention will be given to maritime practice and procedure, focusing on such issues as removal to federal court, right to jury trial, vessel seizure and attachment, and the perfection of in rem jurisdiction.
Prerequisite(s):

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ADR in the Workplace (3)
505D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 598)
STUDENTS WHO HAVE ALREADY TAKEN ARBITRATION (LABOR) ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO ENROLL IN THIS COURSE. Arbitration of disputes arising out of collective bargaining agreements has come to be the model for resolving statutory and common law disputes that arise in the nonunion worlplace. Growing reliance on mediation and arbitration hybrids alters the role of advocates and even the definition of employee's legal rights. This course will focus on a wide range of topics-arbitrability determinations, injunctions, duty of fair representation, the doctrine of deferral, the role of external law and whether arbitrators should follow the federal law, the role of precedent in labor and employment law, discipline and discharge, past practice, seniority, management rights, subcontracting, union security agreements and their enforceability, and arbitration in the public sector. We will also examine the current criticism of labor arbitration-its efficiency, honesty and underlying ideology. Finally, we will cover the spectrum of topics associated with individual employment arbitration-judicial application of "Gilmer" and its progeny, the merits and demerits of compulsory arbitration, grievance mediation, and peer review systems.
Prerequisite(s):

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Advanced Legal Research (2)
586
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 509)
The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Advanced Mediation (2)
587G
Concentration(s):
An intensive skills-based course preparing students to compete in mediation competitions. Students will be selected based on the basis of their skills, their potential to be excellent teammates, to work hard, and to represent Michigan State University College of Law. This course allows students to develop their mediation and representation skills in an intensive, skills-based format. Preparing for a regional mediation competition, students will develop skills in the areas of problem analysis, mediation preparation, communications skills and strategies, and reflection and improvement. Through competition, students experience what it is to be a professional, competent, and ethical mediation advocate and third-party neutral. If successful, students may advance to compete at an international mediation competition. In addition to participation in the regional competition, the course will provide skills building opportunity through mediation simulations.
Prerequisite(s): Mediation Advocacy and Domestic Relations Mediator Training or Mediation Advocacy and Civil Facilitative Mediator Training

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Advanced Patent Law (2)
533A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 430)
This seminar course analyzes advanced patent practice including litigation, prosecution before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, opinion preparation and recently developing topics. A research paper is required. No technical degree is necessary.
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite(s): Patent Law or Instructor’s Approval

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Advanced Studies in Health Care Law (2)
558T
Concentration(s):
This course offers opportunity for student-directed study and writing about health care legal systems and issues. It requires individualized research and writing, as well as selection of class readings, class presentations and leadership of discussions among colleagues in the class. Virtually any legal topic relevant to human health care in the United States is open for the students’ investigation. The course is geared towards those who have had some prior study in the field.
Prerequisite(s): Health Care Laws 558C, or Health Care Fraud and Abuse 558J, or Medical-Legal Problems 558F, or Health Care Organizations, Reimbursement and Regulation, 558U. The professor may approve enrollment of students who have not completed a prerequisite course.

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Advanced Topics in Indian Law (2)
635A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 563)
Provides an opportunity for in-depth discussion and examination of current legal issues of federal and tribal law in Indian country including tribal gaming and economic development, tribal policy and governance, treaty rights, international indigenous peoples, and other contemporary topics.
Prerequisite(s): Federal Law and Indian Tribes

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Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Indian Gaming (2)
635A
Concentration(s):
This course will introduce students to the unique legal issues that govern Indian gaming activities. Indian Gaming has been the largest economic development tool available to Indian tribal governments over the past 30 years. Today, the Indian gaming industry generates more than $25 billion per year, nationwide. Students in this class will learn about the federal and tribal regulatory structures that govern tribal gaming, the interplay of federal, state, tribal, and local laws in this regulatory structure, the process by which tribes and states negotiate gaming compacts, and the nuanced classification of tribal gaming activities. It is highly recommended that you have taken Federal Law and Indian Tribes as a pre-requisite. See Prof. Fletcher for an override if you have not taken this course.
Prerequisite(s): Federal Law and Indian Tribes

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Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Global Perspectives on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2)
635A
Concentration(s):
There are nearly 400 million indigenous peoples throughout the world. Historically, many indigenous peoples have experienced displacement, loss of control over resources, forced assimilation, and genocide. Students will study the place of indigenous peoples within the international legal system and the rights of indigenous peoples within the domestic legal systems of several countries. A portion of this course will focus on international law and institutions principally focused on indigenous peoples; challenges of asserting indigenous rights using the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the ILO Conventions 107 and 169, the Draft American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the World Bank's Operational Policy 4.10 and related Bank Procedures; and indigenous claims brought before the Inter-American Human Rights System. Students also will study the comparative law of indigenous peoples. The law of several jurisdictions, including the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Norway, and Colombia will be examined to compare their treatment of indigenous rights. The themes of indigenous rights to self-determination and rights to land, resources, and cultural survival will be addressed throughout the course.


Prerequisite(s): Federal Law and Indian Tribes

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Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Indian Child Welfare Act (2)
635A
Concentration(s):
This course will be focused on the implementation, interpretation and understanding of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). ICWA, a federal statute interpreted almost entirely in state and tribal courts, applies to all "non-voluntary" termination of parental rights if the child involved is considered an Indian child. This law was passed in 1978 in response to the overwhelming numbers of Indian children in foster care and adopted away from their tribes and families. ICWA is one of the most important statutes in federal Indian law and even those not in the Indian law field will likely encounter it.
Prerequisite(s): Federal Law and Indian Tribes

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Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Native American Natural Resources Law (2)
635A
Concentration(s):
This course explores issues relating to property rights, environmental protection, and natural resources in Indian country. The topics addressed will include land use and environmental protection; natural resources development; water rights: tribal, cultural and religious relationships with the land; and land ownership and property rights of tribes.
Prerequisite(s): Federal Law and Indian Tribes

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Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Tribal Law (2)
635A
Concentration(s):
This course provides in-depth coverage of the laws of American Indian nations, including tribal court jurisprudence and practice, tribal constitutional law, tribal economic development, and tribal customary and traditional law.
Prerequisite(s): Federal Law and Indian Tribes

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Advocacy (2)
530J
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Advocacy for Foreign-Educated Lawyers (3)
804C
Concentration(s):
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for lawyers who obtained their law degrees in countries other than the United States to practice their public speaking skills in an American law school environment. Course components include the study and practice of the elements of oral advocacy, including critical analysis and the development of effective public speaking techniques. This is primarily an experiential learning course with a focus on the delivery and critique of short oral exercises. The course structure follows possible pre-trial developments in a fictional legal case; students will be asked to step into the roles of parties and participants and advocate their positions through presentations, negotiations and oral argument. Students must complete two practice arguments which may fall outside of normal class hours, and must attend and observe at least one hour of argument in a local courtroom. While some written work will be assigned, the focus of this course is on the oral elements of advocacy. The credits earned in this course cannot be used toward the minimum credits needed to satisfy graduation requirements.
Prerequisite(s):

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Agricultural Law (2)
566N
Concentration(s):
Students will learn about the regulatory framework of the food and agriculture sector at the federal, state, and local levels and how the application of this framework impacts all citizens. This includes the production, processing, and distribution of food, fiber, and other products that make up a large portion of the economies of the nation and the State of Michigan. Students will learn about the origins and impacts of these regulatory components and how evolving trends and public opinion are changing the food and agriculture sector
Prerequisite(s):

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American Constitutional Law for LL.M. (3)
806A
Concentration(s):
This course is for LL.M. students only. The course is designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals of the United States Constitution by surveying the Constitution’s approach to governmental structure and individual rights. Major topics include Federalism, Separation of Powers, Due Process, Equal Protection, and Freedom of Speech. Students who have taken Constitutional Law I or II are not eligible to enroll in this course.

Prerequisite(s):

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American Legal History Seminar (3)
636
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 552)
This seminar will analyze the tension between the rights of the individual and the role of government in society as the central theme in the development of the American legal system. Rather than a strict chronological review, the course will consist of a series of studies of the development of legal and political institutions and their effect on the citizenry. Classes will be discussion-based and will rely on extensive reading of original sources. Students should gain an understanding of how the evolution of legal rules reflects institutional change, and should learn to see law as a dynamic process rather than a collection of static concepts.
Fulfills ULWR
Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I

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Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Corporate Finance (1)
637C
Concentration(s):
Condensed principles of corporate finance to serve as a primer that provides law students the tools necessary to succeed as 'lawyers' in the various legal fields that use these principles.
Prerequisite(s):

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Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Game Theory (1)
637D
Concentration(s):
(NEW course as of Spring 2006)
Condensed principles of game theory to serve as a primer that provides law students the tools necessary to succeed as 'lawyers' in the various legal fields that use these principles.

Prerequisite(s):

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Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Microeconomics (1)
509A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 607A)
Condensed principles of microeconomics to serves as a primer that provides law students the tools necessary to succeed as 'lawyers' in the various fields that use these principles.
Prerequisite(s): Students who have taken Law and Economics (515) may not take this course.

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Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Statistics (1)
509B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 607B)
Condensed principles of statistics to serve as a primer that provides law students the tools necessary to succeed as 'lawyers' in the various legal fields that use these principles.
Prerequisite(s): Students who have taken Quantitative Analysis for Lawyers (637E) may not take this course.

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Animal Health, World Trade, and Food Safety (3)
810E
Concentration(s):
The objective of this online course is to familiarize students with the history, development and workings of the OIE, with particular emphasis on its role as the organization responsible for setting international standards for animal health and zoonoses, and attention to its new mandates for animal welfare and food safety.


Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Animal Law (3)
565A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 501)
A survey of animal legal issues including property status, zoning and criminal anti-cruelty laws. Additionally, legal policy issues will be discussed, such as what to do with dangerous dogs, and what level of animal welfare should be provided to agricultural animals. The distinction between animal welfare and animal rights will be considered.
Prerequisite(s):

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Antitrust Law (2)
504
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 310)This course will explore the role of antitrust law and analysis of restraints of trade and competition in various markets. Beginning with an analysis of the goals of antitrust law, and their operation in society, the requirements of antitrust claims will be explored through historical and current examples. Highlights will include problems in market power, monopoly, price fixing, tying, bundling, and special problems with patents. The course will include discussion of recent issues in antitrust law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Applied Evidence (2)
590A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 453)
One of the biggest observed deficiencies of many trial attorneys is their lack of understanding of how to use the rules of evidence. This course is an intensive exploration of evidentiary principles as they are played out in the context of a trial. This course gives the student experience at both making and arguing objections. It will benefit any student intending to be a litigator.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s): Evidence

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Arbitration (3)
505A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 569)
A course dealing with all aspects of arbitrating disputes under collective bargaining agreements, including judicial review of arbitration procedures and analyseis of the concepts applied by arbitrators in reaching their respective decisions. Students will have an opportunity to observe an actual arbitration in process and participate as an advocate in a mock arbitration.
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

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Arbitration (Labor) (2)
505B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 315)
STUDENTS WHO HAVE ALREADY TAKEN ADR IN THE WORKPLACE ARE NOT ELIGIBLE TO ENROLL IN THIS COURSE. The study of current thinking of arbitrators interpreting collective bargaining agreements including techniques of opinion writing and advocacy before labor arbitrators. The course focuses on collective bargaining agreements, whether an issue is subject to arbitration, timelines for filing an arbitration, the burden of proof, quantum of proof, the concept of discipline and just cause, as well as contract interpretation. Students will participate in mock trials and will be responsible for drafting an arbitration opinion as a class assignment.
Prerequisite(s):

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Arbitration Advocacy (0)
505G
Concentration(s):
Students will be exposed to the following topics: mandatory versus voluntary arbitration, including persuading opposing counsel to participate, preliminary pre-arbitration considerations (stages of the arbitration process: initiation, preparation, pre-hearing, hearing, decision-making, and award), selecting cases for arbitration, attorney ethics, considering site inspection and audiovisual aids, selecting expert witness, arbitrator ethics, pre-hearing advocacy (preparing the arbitration demand, drafting motions and responses, drafting position statements), the preliminary hearing (arbitrability issues, joinder of parties, witness lists, hearing exhibits, order of evidence, sequestration of witnesses, burdens of proof, subpoenas, nature and form of award), preparing for the arbitration hearing (designing a persuasive "trial story," preparing the client, and preparing witnesses/exhibits), advocacy during the arbitration hearing (procedural rules, opening statements, presentation of facts, comments on opposition's case, summary and request for relief, evidentiary rules, direct examination, cross-examination, impeachment, expert testimony, evidentiary foundations, and persuasive use of exhibits), post-hearing advocacy (drafting post-hearing briefs, motions to re-open proceedings, enforcing the award, and challenging the award).

The primary objectives of the course are to better understand the nature and practice of commercial arbitration; and to develop advocacy skills by providing "hands-on" training in commercial arbitration.

This course is restricted to students selected for the ABA Commercial Arbitration Competition.

Prerequisite(s):

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Assisted Reproductive Technologies Seminar (2)
558N
Concentration(s):
This seminar will examine the legal, medical, and ethical issues surrounding assisted reproductive technologies.
Prerequisite(s):

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Basic Income Taxation A (2)
501A
Concentration(s):Tax
(Formerly DCL 249)
A survey course introducing the basic concepts of federal income taxation. Students will gain an understanding of the concepts of gross income, exclusions from income, capital gains and losses, and deductions. Students will also be exposed to tax issues that often arise for clients in the general practice of law. Topics likely to be covered include tax consequences: upon the sale of a residence; upon divorce; and in personal injury cases. Students will develop facility in analyzing both cases and statutes.
Prerequisite(s): NOTE: Students that enroll in Basic Income Taxation A are ineligible to enroll in Basic Income Taxation or Basic Income Taxation B.

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Basic Income Taxation B (4)
501B
Concentration(s):Tax
(Formerly DCL 250)
Like Basic Income Taxation A, this course introduces the basic concepts of federal income taxation. Basic Income Taxation B, however, goes beyond a survey course by a rigorous examination of technical tax issues, including a focus on solving complex tax problems. This course is ideal for students interested in pursuing legal practice in the tax or business fields. Students will be exposed to the same topics covered in Basic Income Taxation A, but will also study additional topics. Topics likely to be covered include: business and profit-seeking expenditures, capital expenditures, depreciation, the home-office deduction, tax planning for divorce, non-recourse debt, including issues relating to basis and amount realized, and anti-tax abuse provisions limiting tax shelters, including at-risk rules and active participation requirements. In resolving problems, students will have ample opportunity to develop facility in interpreting complex statutes and in applying law from various additional sources. Moreover, the themes studied will allow students to understand that tax legislation is a dynamic process in which the law evolves as a result of taxpayers devising new strategies and from policymakers' responses.

Prerequisite(s): Students that enroll in Basic Income Taxation B are ineligible to enroll in Basic Income Taxation or Basic Income Taxation A.

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Basic Will Drafting (3)
540A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 391)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the interviewing function and the drafting of wills and other basic estate planning vehicles for clients whose estates are not subject to federal estate tax. An evaluation of usable forms and discussion of when and how to use them intelligently will be a focus of the course. A client interview and drafting exercises, including an entire basic estate plan, are contemplated. Prerequisite: Decedents' Estates and Trusts

Prerequisite(s): Decedents' Estates and Trusts

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Biotechnology Law and Food Products (3)
810P
Concentration(s):
This course explores the impact of biotechnology on food production and food safety. After an introduction to biotechnology and the breadth of biotechnology-created foods available, the class will focus on the regulation of food safety and its environmental impact, both in the U.S. and internationally. Students will discuss the impact of public perception on the biotechnology agriculture and transgenic animals industries. No scientific or other class pre-requisites are required.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Biotechnology Law Seminar (2)
558S
Concentration(s):
This seminar will examine some of the many ways that biotechnology impacts the law as well as the ways that the law has impacted the growth of biotechnology. Current biotechnology innovations or controversies will be used to explore the impacts of this technology on a selection of legal topics which may include intellectual property, business, federal regulations, property, criminal law, indigenous law, evidence, bioethics and international law. No science background is required for the course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Business Enterprises (4)
500M
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 409)
This course discusses issues relevant to the laws of agency, partnerships, sole proprietorships and closely held corporations.
Prerequisite(s):

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Business, Securities and Tax Planning (2)
507
Concentration(s):Tax
(Formerly DCL 440)
The course will deal with problems of corporations and, to a lesser extent, partnerships in the areas of organization, allocation of control, issuance of securities, use of debt and equity financing, dividends, acquisitions and sales of businesses, liquidation and dissolution, and mergers. Some drafting and legal research will be involved. The course will be taught both by lecture and through student participation.

EITHER Basic Income Tax A or Basic Income Tax B AND Business Enterprises fulflls the prerequisite.

Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation A, Basic Income Taxation B, Business Enterprises

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Canadian Charter of Rights (2)
548A
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 340)
This course will provide a general introduction to the principles of the Canadian Charter of Rights. Among the topics to be covered will be the fundamental freedoms under the charter, democratic rights, mobility rights, legal rights, language rights, equality rights, enforcement and application of the charter, and the override clause.
Prerequisite(s):

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Canadian Summer Law Placement (6)
634
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 392)
This course primarily involves a closely monitored placement during the summer in Canada under the sponsorship of outstanding Canadian lawyers, judges or members of Parliament with legal affair responsibilities. An intensive introductory course by Canadian law faculty on Canada and the Canadian legal system precedes the individual placements, which are accompanied by weekly seminars, a Canadian speakers program and cultural field events. Students will complete two thoughtfully researched papers on legal issues of current interest in Canada.
Prerequisite(s):

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Capital Punishment (3)
579Y
Concentration(s):
A focus on federal constitutional law, primarily the 8th Amendment and its regulation of capital punishment. The federal constitutional law largely regulates state criminal law. Using the 8th Amendment and state criminal laws, the course will consider how death eligibility is defined and administered. It will explore the limits imposed by the Constitution and by various state and federal statutes. The course also will consider larger questions including, Why have the death penalty? Is the system working? Is it necessary? Is it fair? What changes should be made? As part of this inquiry we will consider the role of race in capital punishment, the impact of wrongful convictions, and recent moves to abolish or limit capital punishment in several jurisdictions. The course also examines the law of federal habeas corpus in the context of the death penalty. This section engages in a close reading of a complicated set of statutes, as well as the Supreme Court decisions construing those statutes.
Prerequisite(s):

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Capstone Intellectual Property and Communications Law Seminar (1)
535E
Concentration(s):
This course uses presentations by leading scholars of their works-in-progress in the area of IP and communications law. Students will be responsible for reading the papers, writing a critique, preparing questions and participating in the seminar.. This course is highly recommended for all students who wish to write a ULWR or law review note in intellectual property, information, or communications law in a subsequent semester.
Prerequisite(s):

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Chance at Childhood Clinic (4)

Concentration(s):
The Clinic provides a setting for law and social work students to gain experience in child advocacy. The Clinic provides a forum for advocating for children, both in individual cases and through seeking to affect public policy and practice within the state of Michigan. Student teams will serve in a variety of roles to effectively advocate for children.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspective and Advocacy

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Chapter 11 Reorganization (3)
506F
Concentration(s):
This course provides an in-depth examination of the issues that arise inside Chapter 11. The course focus is transactional. The students will have to draft various documents, including a chapter 11 plan for a hypothetical debtor.
Prerequisite(s): Consumer Bankruptcy

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Child Advocacy (2)
541A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 446)
This class is designed to acquaint future attorneys and social workers with their unique roles and responsibilities in representing and advocating for children and families as they interact with the state government: its departments, agencies, laws and rules.

Prerequisite(s):

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Civil Litigation Practice and Procedure for Foreign Lawyers (3)
805
Concentration(s):
This course explains the litigation process in the United States. It is designed to equip foreign-educated lawyers with the skills needed to manage lawsuits involving companies located abroad or subsidiary companies in the United States. The explanation includes (1) the jurisdiction of Unites States courts over lawsuits by or against these companies, (2) the procedures for filing or accepting a Complaint under the Hague Convention for the Service of Process Abroad and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure; (3) discovery under the Federal Rules, especially emerging requirements for electronic data, and the Hague Convention on the Taking of Evidence Abroad; (4) Rule 30(b)(6) requirements for testimony by corporate witnesses; (5) discovery sanctions; (6) trial procedures, particularly the use of company documents, witness testimony, and government investigations and recall orders as evidence; and, finally, appeal procedures.

The fundamental practice skills involve selection of counsel; preparation of case budgets and management of legal fees; early evaluation of cases to decide if they should be tried or settled, and determining settlement values; negotiating settlements; mediating cases; collecting and producing documents and e-data; obtaining confidentiality agreements for proprietary information; preparing witnesses for deposition and trial, as well as at Congressional hearings (especially foreign company witnesses); and preparing for media requests, particularly during trial. These procedures and practice skills will come alive through the use of real-world examples. Students enrolled in this course are not eligible to enroll in International civil Litigation (548K) Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.

Prerequisite(s):

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Civil Procedure I (4)
530A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly 500A and 500B)
A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.
Prerequisite(s):

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Civil Rights Clinic I (4)
630X
Concentration(s):
Students will receive a versatile and well-rounded education in the intricacies of civil rights law and hone client management, case management, negotiation, and trial skills. Students will use their knowledge and skills to litigate civil rights cases in federal District Court (WD, MI) for their clients, prisoners who are incarcerated in Michigan and have asserted claims about the conditions of their confinement. Under the supervision of clinic faculty, students will represent their clients at all stages of these cases, including case development and strategy, discovery, motion practice, and trial. In addition to class times, students enrolled in this clinical program must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week NOTE: (1) Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for the application deadline). Preference will be given to students who commit to participate in the clinic for two semesters. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisite(s): All student clinicians enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic I must have successfully completed RWA and Advocacy. In addition, they must have successfully completed the first year (six credits) of the Law Colleges TPI program or must have successfully completed at least six credits in Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Rights Seminar, Complex Civil Litigation, or Constitutional Law II.
Prerequisite(s):

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Civil Rights Clinic II (4)
630Z
Concentration(s):
This is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Civil Rights Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling clients, managing a caseload, and litigating civil rights cases on their clients behalf in federal District Court. Typically, students who are enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic II assume a more in-depth role in their clients litigation. As in Civil Rights Clinic I, students further their experience under the supervision of clinic faculty and enhance their knowledge of civil rights law and trial practice. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12 to15 hours weekly). NOTE: (1) Enrollment in Civil Rights Clinic II is by invitation only. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Rights Clinic I

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Civil Trial Advocacy I (2)
587B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 472)

Evidence may be taken concurrently with Advocacy I, but extra preparation may be necessary.

Advocacy I begins your journey into civil trial practice. Using a circuit court forum and the Michigan Court Rules, we will explore discovery in the context of a typical case from the filing of a complaint to the first day of trial. Students will draft complaints, answers and affirmative defenses, propound written discovery, take fact and expert dipositions, prepare and argue motions and mediation, and prepare for trial. There will be role-play as plaintiff or defense counsel. The final grade is a compilation of oral in-class performance and participation, and written assignments.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Civil Trial Advocacy II (2)
587C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 411)
Civil Trial Advocacy II continues your journey into civil trial practice. Using a circuit court forum and the Michigan Court Rules, we will explore trial practice in the context of a typical tort case from the first day of trial to closing arguments. Students will engage in all aspects of trial practice, oral and written, and take a case through trial. Students will be assigned the role of plaintiff or defense counsel. In-class performance and written assignments will be individually graded. The final grade is a compilation of these.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisites are Civil Procedure II, Evidence and Civil Trial Advocacy I or a complete understanding of the Michigan Court rules regarding discovery.


Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Civil Procedure II, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Evidence

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Client Counseling and Interviewing (2)
591A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 450)
This course adopts a client-centered approach in looking at legal problems and examines how to make clients partners in problem solving. Attention is paid to the economic, social and psychological aspects of clients' legal problems. The course starts with an examination of fundamental counseling skills, followed by an analysis of the information gathering process and ultimate decision making.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Evidence

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Climate Change Law and Policy (2)
566K
Concentration(s):
This course will expose students to scientific evidence in support of climate change and the impacts to human health, natural resources, and human development; international law and policy developments, with an introduction to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and a discussion of the Kyoto Protocol and post-Kyoto international action; exploration of U.S. efforts to address climate impacts through national legislation; review of the judiciary's reaction to climate change; examination of efforts to regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act and other federal laws; and assess regional, state and local responses to climate change focusing, in particular, on their relationship to national law and policy.
Students will participate in a negotiation exercise comprised of several groups with distinct interests and perspectives on climate change. This exercise is intended to enhance students' understanding of the policy constraints, political dynamics and practical realities associated with developing climate change law and policy. Students will learn about corporate responses to climate change, considering the equity, human rights and environmental justice impacts of climate change, and the challenges linked to transitioning from a high carbon to a low carbon economy.


Prerequisite(s):

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Closely- Held Business: Shareholder and Member Disputes (2)
593J
Concentration(s):
This course will examine the common problems, issues, actions, and defenses associated with closely-held business owner's disputes in both a corporate and limited liability company context utilizing Michigan Law as an example. The course will review these problems and issues from an owner's perspective as well as from the business's perspective. This course is designed for those students desiring to become transactional business attorneys to give those students a working knowledge of the basics of this area of the law so that they may consult with business owners both before and after disputes arise, provide strategic and interpretive support to litigation attorneys in the advent of litigation amongst owners, and draft appropriate entity governance documents. A segment of the course will also discuss measures and actions that may be taken to prevent, minimize, or discourage disputes. This will be an interdisciplinary course where students will be able to use concepts of tort, contract, real estate, corporate, limited liability company, employment, tax and potentially many other areas of law. Classroom panel discussions based on actual Michigan case complaints and a final paper will be required in lieu of a final examination.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

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Codex Alimentarius (3)
810F
Concentration(s):
This course is to familiarize students with the history, development and workings of the Codex Alimentarius Commission in formulating and harmonizing food standards and ensuring their global implementation.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Commercial Transactions (3)
501C
Concentration(s):
This course primarily surveys sales of goods (UCC Article 2) and payment systems (UCC Articles 3 and 4) under the Uniform Commercial Code. The course may also address issues relating to leases of goods (UCC Article 2A), the law relating to shipping and storing goods (UCC Article 7), letters of credit (UCC Article 5), and state sales law relating to investment securities (UCC Article 8). These subjects are often tested on many state bar exams.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts II

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Communication Skills for Lawyers (3)
591G
Concentration(s):
This course is designed for students who desire to improve their oral advocacy and public speaking skills in a supportive environment. Course components include the study and practice of the elements of oral advocacy, including critical analysis and the development of effective public speaking techniques. This is primarily an experiential learning course with a focus on the delivery and critique of short oral exercises. Much of the course structure follows possible pre-trial developments in a fictional legal case; students will be asked to step into the roles of parties and participants and advocate their positions through presentations, negotiations and oral argument. Students will learn strategic interviewing and negotiation skills, the significance of nonverbal body language, effective ways to present a client’s “story” and persuasive oral argument and public speaking techniques. Students must complete two practice arguments which may fall outside of normal class hours. This course is open to both J.D. and LL.M. (foreign-educated lawyer) students. J.D. students must have completed RWA and Advocacy, LL.M. students must have taken RWA:LL.M. LL.M. students who have previously taken “Advocacy for Foreign-Educated Lawyers” are not eligible to take this course.
Prerequisite(s): RWA I; RWA II OR Research, Writing & Analysis; Advocacy or RWA:LL.M. This course may not be taken by students in the TPI program.

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Communications Law and Policy (3)
533Q
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 588) Examines the regulatory regimes governing the major modes of communications in the United States, including wireline telephony, wireless telephony, the internet, broadcast and cable. Particular attention will be given to the economic rationales for and critiques or regulation. Readings and class assignments will focus on current legal and regulatory debates in communications policy to provide students with a practical introduction to regulatory law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Comparative Environmental Law (2)
566M
Concentration(s):
Countries worldwide face a similar set of environmental challenges and health and safety risks. The environmental regimes that industrialized nations have put in place in response to these risks reveal both similarities and striking differences in their approaches. This course addresses these differences, their potential explanations, and their implications for the design and reform of environmental policy. We will focus especially on the comparison between American and European response to a variety of environmental risks (climate change, genetically modified foods, risk from chemicals) and broader American/European divisions regarding the precautionary principle. In addition, the course will compare the constitutional foundations, institutional arrangements, and regulatory tools typical of the regulatory regimes under consideration. Unlike courses in International Environmental Law, this class will not address international treaties or problems of transboundary pollution. Instead, it will focus on the domestic law of the respective national, or international (EU), systems.
Prerequisite(s):

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Comparative Law: European Union and Eastern European Trade and Business Practices (1)

Concentration(s):
The course will focus on the internal market of the European Union and the Eastern European countries’ adjustments to the new rules. Selected comparative issues will be presented based on the practices of different states as well as solutions used in the world trade mechanisms and in the US. Students will be introduced to the specifics of the internal market of the European Union including its trade and customs policies. Five major freedoms of the internal market will be discussed based on cases and real-life problems: free movement of workers (including citizenship of the EU), free movement of goods, free movement of services, free movement of payment and investments, as well as the freedom of establishment.
Prerequisite(s):

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Complex Civil Litigation (2)
591B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 528)

This course will examine advanced civil procedure topics that arise in the context of complex civil litigation, from both the plaintiff's and defendant's perspectives. Although Civil Procedure I is not a prerequisite for this courses, it is strongly recommended.
Prerequisite(s): Suggested Prerequisites: Civil Procedure I (500A) & II (500B) or Civil Procedure I (530A)

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Conflict of Laws (3)
550
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 460)
Students who have taken Topics in Conflict of Laws (550A) may not take this course. Conflict of Laws is divided into three parts: (1) personal jurisdiction, (2) choice of law, and (3) full faith and credit to sister-state and foreign-country judgments. The course begins with an examination of the personal jurisdiction of courts and limitations on the exercise of that jurisdiction. The issues to be considered include the following: Where may suit be brought? Given two or more choices of forum, where is it best to bring suit? Next, the course addresses issues concerning the recognition and enforcement of sister-state judgments, as well as foreign country judgments. Finally, the course examines the body of common law known as choice of law. The issues we will address include the following: (1) Which states' rule of decision (substantive law) in a multi-state setting is to be applied to resolve a particular dispute, for example, a dispute over a contract entered into in State A but to be performed in State B, or a multi-state tort, such as negligence? (2) When may a state apply its own law to resolve a dispute without violating the Constitution? (3) When must a state apply federal law or the law of a sister state to resolve a dispute? (4) When must federal courts apply state law to resolve a dispute?
The subject of Conflict of Laws is now tested on the essay portion of the bar exam in more than half the states, including Michigan.

Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I

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Conflict Resolution Clinic I (4)
631D
Concentration(s):
This clinic will focus on teaching students to be problem solvers which is a fundamental skill that lawyers need regardless of the work they do or the setting in which they do this work. The primary method of problem solving that the students will learn is mediation which is increasingly used by lawyers and sometimes mandated by courts, agencies, and organizations to resolve controversies. This course will provide an opportunity to learn the theory, skills, and professionalism issues associated with mediation and conflict resolution. Students will have opportunities to hone and enhance their learning by applying their skills to real problems presented by real people. By doing so, they will provide access to justice to people who would otherwise be unable to afford services.

Professionalism and ethics will be an essential component of the program. Students will be expected to identify, research, and discuss the challenges that they are facing with an eye towards what kind of professional they want to become no matter where they work. They will not only look at the Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct for Lawyers and the Michigan Supreme Court Standards of Conduct for Mediators to inform their discussions, they will be expected to consider the cultural, economic, psychological, moral, policy, and personal implications of choices that they make.

A key component of the clinic is to train students to be reflective practitioners who continue to learn from their experiences for the rest of their professional lives. The students will explicitly be taught to engage in meaningful reflection about their own work and the work of the other professionals with whom they come into contact.

Enrollment is by permission only

Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective; and Advocacy.

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Constitutional Law I (2)
500C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 171)
An introduction to American constitutional law. This course surveys the distribution of national powers among the Congress, the president and the federal judiciary. After examining the fundamentals of judicial review and its limitations, the course considers the delegated powers of Congress and the tensions between Congress and the president in the exercise of national powers. The course concludes with an overview of governmental immunities. Some sections of Regulatory State and constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.

Prerequisite(s):

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Constitutional Law II (4)
500N
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 172)
A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
Prerequisite(s):

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Constitutional Law of the European Union (2)
579V
Concentration(s):
Introduces the EU substantive law of constitutional significance. Coverage will include, though not be limited to, such topics as the European Union's path of legal integration; the institutional structure of the EU; the European Union's sources of law and its substantive, temporal and territorial jurisdiction; the fundamental documents of the European Union including its (nearly adopted) "Constitution"; the main substantive principles underlying EU Law and the role of EU law in the domestic law of Member states; enlargement of the European Union and options of its institutional reform. A student may not take both this course and European Union Law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Constitutional Law of the European Union (Study Abroad) (1)
545C
Concentration(s):
This course is dedicated to the main problems of the structure and law of the European Union. Students will be introduced to the evolution of the European Communities and European Union and the present comparison to the federal structure of the United States. The course will also explain the specificity of the supranational character of the EU law, including the sources of law, the principles governing the legal order and the implementation of the EU law in the member states. In addition, the judicial institutions will be presented, with special emphasis on the Court of Justice of the European Union and its role in the interpretation of the EU law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Constitutional Law Topics: Free Expression (2)
551B
Concentration(s):
(Formlery DCL 554)
The course focuses on the theory and history of speech.
Prerequisite(s):

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Constitutional Litigation (3)
579X
Concentration(s):
This course provides a rigorous examination of the intricacies initiated by individuals seeking to vindicate federal constitutional rights. Primary emphasis will be placed on suits under 42 U.S.C §1983 against state and local governmental entities and their officials. Through a careful study of the many doctrines that the U.S. Supreme Court has pronounced and developed in connection with litigation under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 and Bivens, students will gain a significant understanding of and appreciation for the challenges that confront a constitutional claimant both in establishing liability and in obtaining a remedy. In particular, the course will focus on the essential elements of a § 1983 action, such as the requirement that the defendant have acted “under color of” state or local law, as well as the need to demonstrate that the constitutional violation at issue flowed from an official policy or custom in cases where the defendant is a municipality. There will also be substantial treatment of the various defenses that officials sued in their individual capacity may assert, including absolute immunity (available to those who perform legislative, judicial, and prosecutorial functions), qualified immunity, and res judicata. In addition, the availability of remedies such as damages, injunctive relief, and attorney fees will be explored.
Prerequisite(s):

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Construction Law (2)
601
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 314)
A survey of legal issues with respect to the construction industry. Topics discussed include bid errors, contract disputes, and payment issues. Students will be given an overview of project delivery systems, and the contract clauses found in proprietary and industry standard contract documents. The requirements of the Michigan Lien Law, and other construction related statutes, will be reviewed and discussed.
Prerequisite(s):

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Consumer Bankruptcy (3)
506E
Concentration(s):
This course examines a portion of state debt collection law and a basic overview of bankruptcy fundamentals with a focus on consumer bankruptcy practice under Chapters 7 and 13 of the Bankruptcy Code. While there are no prerequisites, it is strongly recommended that students take Secured Transactions either prior to or at the same this course is taken.
Prerequisite(s):

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Consumer Law (2)
593G
Concentration(s):
This course examines special requirements for consumer transactions. It includes deception in the marketplace, including many disclosure requirements; credit (discrimination, accuracy, and other limitations),; debt collection practices; and consumer remedies. Both federal and state laws will be covered. One focus will be how these requirements supersede normal contract, tort, and property laws. Civil, administrative, and criminal actions will be addressed.


Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II, Property, Torts I

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Contract Drafting (3)
594A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL370) The specific purpose of this class is to use contract principles that the student has learned in the first year as a vehicle to develop the student's abilities as a planner and counselor. It will involve the study of some of the common pitfalls encountered in contract drafting and called upon to perform specific exercises in which the student will use her/his basic knowledge of contracts to draft various documents. In the course of the drafting, the student will be required to predict what may happen, provide for that contingency and attempt to protect the client.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II

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Contract Negotiation (1)
530F
Concentration(s):
This course introduces first-year students to principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in mock negotiation exercises.
Prerequisite(s):

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Contract Theory Seminar (2)
594B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 600)
This course will explore the theoretical and jurisprudential basis for enforcement of promises. Readings and discussions will address historical and anthropological conceptions of contract, comparative analyses of the civil and common law of contracts and gift promises, theoretical justifications for state enforcement of promises and modern challenges to contract doctrines and principles such as freedom of contract and private autonomy.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II

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Contracts (4)
530B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E)
A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Copyright Law (3)
533B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 375)
According to Article 1, Section 8, Clause 8 of the U.S. Constitution, Congress has the power to promote the "progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries." Congress has adopted copyright statutes to protect forms of expression, which include computer software. This course will explore the history of copyright protection, with a particular emphasis on entertainment litigation.
Prerequisite(s):

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Corporate Finance (3)
508B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 380)
In Corporate Finance the principles of accounting and valuation and the basic financial environment of closely held companies and public companies will be examined. Building on this foundation, the fundamental issues surrounding common stock, preferred stock and debt will be analyzed. Finally, all these fundamentals will be applied in examining financial issues with mergers and acquisitions and tender offers and in understanding how "deals" are done. Students who have not taken Business Enterprises are permitted to enroll in this course if they are simultaneously enrolled in Business Enterprises.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

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Corporate Income Taxation (3)
508C
Concentration(s):Tax; and also Corporate
(Formerly DCL 465)
The course will focus on federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders, the tax consequences of choice of entity, the formation and liquidations of corporations, the taxation of corporations and shareholders, and the tax aspects of S corporations. EITHER Basic Income Tax A OR Basic Income Tax B fulfills the prerequisite. If the system will not let you register with either of these prerequisites, please contact the Registrar's Office.
Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation A, Basic Income Taxation B

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Corporate Law and Policy Seminar (2)
508D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 483)
This advanced seminar in corporate law will cover one or more practice areas of contemporary importance. Past or planned topics include private equity, corporate speech and political activity, and investor conflicts. The course will attempt a thorough treatment of relevant positive law, and address positive and normative issues of corporate regulation by courts and policy makers. Students will also be expected to engage with the economic, financial and business issues which every successful corporate practitioner should understand. The materials will consist of cases, statutes, scholarly articles, policy proposals and other readings. There are no formal prerequisites, but students are strongly advised to have taken a course in corporate law or corporate governance. The seminar may quickly dive into concepts that will be difficult to understand without some familiarity with corporate law principles.
Prerequisite(s):

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Criminal Law (3)
500F
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 131)
An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
Prerequisite(s):

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Criminal Procedure I (LL.M) (3)
616B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 303) This course is for LL.M students only. A close examination of power and limitations in gathering evidence, proceedings before trial, essentials of a fair trial, post-conviction powers and limitations, quasi-criminal proceedings and pretrial detention.
Prerequisite(s):

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Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (3)
616C
Concentration(s):Criminal Law
(Formerly Criminal Procedure II) This course examines various issues associated with criminal adjudications with a focus on federal constitutional rights. The course covers issues such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, bail and pretrial detention, discovery, the plea bargaining process, speedy trial rights, federal sentencing guidelines, and post-conviction review. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Criminal Procedure: Investigation in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure II are ineligible to enroll in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Criminal Procedure: Investigation (3)
616B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Criminal Trial Advocacy I - PreTrial (2)
617A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 470)
This practical course is designed to familiarize the student with the criminal justice process. The course consists of lectures and exercises covering criminal case initiation, the initial appearance, indictments, plea negotiations, pretrial discovery and pretrial motions leading up to up to a trial. Special emphasis will be placed on criminal procedure.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Criminal Law

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Criminal Trial Advocacy II Trial (2)
617B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 471)
This course is designed to develop the student's trial skills for criminal law practice. The course consists of lecture and participation in practical exercises covering opening statements, introduction of evidence, direct and cross-examination, and closing arguments. Each student, paired with a trial partner, will be required to complete a criminal trial final exam against a second pair of students. Students may take the prerequisite, Evidence, concurrently.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

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Criminal Trial Advocacy III Post-Conviction Remedies (2)
617C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 433)
This course focuses on the representation issues raised during the critical stage of sentencing. The following topics are covered: duties/function of counsel, statutes, types of sentencing, indeterminate sentencing, length, sentencing plan, credit for time served, concurrent/consecutive, PSIs, considerations, habitual offender, altering sentences, probation, violations, restitution, alternatives, plea bargaining, guilty pleas, Proposal B, good time); sentencing guidelines demonstration; post-conviction motions; criminal appeals; parole; habeas corpus, state and federal; prisoners' rights; and sentencing reform/capital punishment.
Prerequisite(s):

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Current Issues in Securities Regulation (2)
524C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW 503) This course will address current issues in securities regulation including: evolving market structures; broker-dealer regulation and inter-relationships with brokerage firms, issuers and customers; investment adviser regulation; advanced issues in private placement; recent developments in SEC investigations, enforcement proceedings and related criminal actions; public company regulation; and professional obligations for attorneys and accountants.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

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Cyber Law (3)
533C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 455)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
This course gives a broad overview of some of the main areas in which technology has challenged traditional legal doctrines and the way we practice law. Technology law is more than just "computer law" or "cyberlaw." It is Internet law and information law. Some of the topics that will be covered are: 1) privacy issues; 2) liability of online information providers; 3) conducting business in cyberspace; 4) Internet and computer use policies in business, university and government; 5) cybercrimes and law enforcement; 6) technology license agreement and software purchase contracts; and 7) using computer-generated evidence or data.
Prerequisite(s):

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Decedents' Estates and Trusts (4)
501D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 210)
A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes
and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
Prerequisite(s):

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Design Thinking for Legal Services (2)

Concentration(s):
This course prepares the law student to address the competitive landscape of the legal services market faced by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession. It fosters actionable skills and knowledge that translate into creative problem solving for business – their own or that of their clients. This class focuses on design thinking and its methodologies that can uniquely and powerfully address the problems/challenges involved in the business of law. An overview of all phases of this methodology will be undertaken, including empathy and creative intelligence, business modeling, and business/service design. Students will also examine many of the methods, tools, and exercises that are key to unlocking business value as achieved through design thinking. This course provides background preparation for operating a legal practice (small or large), a non-lawyer business, aiding clients in achieving business goals, and otherwise becoming a business-enabled lawyer or business leader.
Prerequisite(s):

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Directed Study (0)
624
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 690)
Students may receive credit for research and writing in areas of interest to them. This must be worked out in advance with a member of the full-time faculty. Ordinarily a paper of at least 20 pages is required, not counting endnotes, for two hours credit. A maximum of four credit hours may be applied towards graduation. Students on Reexamination Probation II are ineligible for directed studies.
Prerequisite(s):

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Directed Study – Summer Academy in Global Food Law & Policy (3)
624
Concentration(s):
The Summer Academy in Global Food Law & Policy is an established one-week summer program that brings together practitioners, policymakers, industry representatives and leading academics working in the field of food law and policy. It offers intensive training on the most innovative developments in global food regulation and provides a unique opportunity for professional development and networking in an informal and inter-disciplinary setting. By talking, studying and interacting with food experts from all over the world, participants are able to gain new perspectives into both their own sectors and international regulatory issues. This is achieved by combining traditional classroom instruction with experiential learning opportunities offered by dedicated and distinguished international experts. Directed study credit will be awarded to students enrolled in this course.
Prerequisite(s): Intended for students in the Global Food Law program only

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Domestic Violence (2)
541B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 427)
A historical background of Domestic Violence. Focus will be placed on understanding the nature of domestic violence, the prevention of domestic violence, and the survivor and batterer behavior.
Prerequisite(s):

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E-Discovery (2)
537D
Concentration(s):
This course teaches students the law, theory, and practice of discovery of electronically stored documents and information. The course covers both the federal and Michigan state law governing the production of electronic documents, privilege, motions to compel, and protective orders—as well as the applicable professional standards. Students will be provided a theoretical understanding of the dominant computer algorithmic techniques used in e-discovery (search terms and predictive coding) as well as the legal, ethical, and technological problems each presents. Emphasis will be on hands-on work with e-discovery software.
Prerequisite(s):

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Education Law (2)
579D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 456)
This course provides an overview of students’ rights in K-12 public schools in the United States with a focus on federal constitutional law. Specific topics covered can include free speech, search and seizure, racial and ethnic equity including desegregation, gender equity, corporal punishment, school finance, and federal statutory law including the No Child Left Behind Act. The course can be benefit individuals interested in representing districts or students, and also those who may represent a public sector client, even if employed by a private firm.
Prerequisite(s):

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Effective Legal Analysis & Process (1)
530P
Concentration(s):
The purpose of this course is to build the critical skills necessary to succeed in law school and on the bar exam. Various hands-on activities will help students master skills such as careful reading, issue spotting, structuring an answer, managing time, balancing the analysis of a close question, and taking both multiple choice and essay tests.
Prerequisite(s):

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Elder Law (2)
541C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 510)
The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the unique clients needs of the elder client and their families. The elderly pose a unique risk to abuse and victimization, which, while similar to that of a minor, require a recognition of their status as a legally competent adult. The course will address the most salient issues of an elderly client base: the attorney client relationship; the responsibilities and duties imposed by the durable powers statutes, entitlement programs, housing alternatives, Medicaid planning, abuse, guardianships, estate planning and family law issues.
Prerequisite(s):

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Election Law (2)
579E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 318)
This course involves the study of election issues, including voting; redistricting; candidacy, ballots and ballot access; party organization; initiative, referendum and recall; campaign finance; and recounts.

Prerequisite(s):

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Employment Law (3)
511C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 522)
This is an introductory employment law course, which will begin with the
foundations of employment law, including an examination of the employment relationship and terms and conditions of employment. A substantial portion of the course will cover federal legislation and related case law, such as
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family
and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).
Prerequisite(s):

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Energy Law and Policy (2)
566J
Concentration(s):
The course will explore the evolution, nature and purpose of federal and state regulation of the natural gas and electric power industries in the Unites States. Particular emphasis will focus on the regulatory agencies themselves, both state and federal.
Prerequisite(s):

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Entrepreneurial Lawyering (2)
537E
Concentration(s):
Enrollment is by permission only. This course helps students understand the economic pressures, technological changes, and globalization facing the legal profession in the 21st century, and to assist students in successfully navigating their legal career given these challenges. The course explores the concept of a virtual law practice as well as the use of technology and cloud-computing in building a law practice; free and low-cost resources and tools will be shared that will help the entrepreneur-minded student identify ways to leverage leading-edge technology to defray start-up costs associated with launching a practice and to control overhead. Ethics, licensing, and malpractice issues will also be discussed. The course will be particularly useful for students who are contemplating solo practice, consulting, or engaging in an entrepreneurial venture, as well as those who are considering non-traditional uses for their law degree. Other topics to be covered include client development and networking, case studies of innovative legal services delivery mechanisms and alternative business structures, and work/life balance including the study of emotional intelligence and mindful lawyering practices. This course assumes students may (or may not) arrive with a range of experience in the use of technology—we will provide training for everything needed to succeed in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Environmental Law (3)
566A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 323)
This course provides an introduction to the legal principles, institutions, and policy debates central to American environmental regulation. The course begins with an overview of economical and ethical justifications for environmental regulation, historical and contemporary common-law-based approaches to environmental problems, and the evolution of federal environmental law. Next the course surveys the regulatory programs enacted under major environmental statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The course will focus in this connection on differences in the statutory criteria used to determine the stringency of regulation (risk-based, technology-based, and cost-benefit standards), and the choice between direct regulation and economic-incentive-based means of meeting environmental goals. Finally, discussion will turn to the challenges of environmental enforcement, and the role of agencies, courts and citizens groups in the implementation of environmental law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Equity (3)
579F
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 333)
Considered are the history and development of equity, equity jurisdiction, remedies available in equity and contempt powers.
Prerequisite(s):

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Estate and Gift Taxation (3)
540D
Concentration(s):Tax
(Formerly DCL 381)
This course will examine a decedent's gross estate and the determination of appropriate deductions therefrom, including the marital deduction, as well as how the tax is computed. Issues regarding taxable gifts, deductions, exclusions and exemptions will be explored, as well as computation of gift tax.

Prerequisite(s):

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Estate Planning and Drafting Seminar (2)
540B
Concentration(s):Tax
(Formerly DCL 482)
This course focuses on the impact of federal estate, gift and generation-skipping transfer taxes on will and trust drafting. Various aspects of Michigan law and state tax issues also will be covered. There will be several drafting assignments as well as a paper analyzing and making recommendations concerning a complex estate planning problem. EITHER Basic Income Tax A OR Basic Income Tax B fulfills the prerequisite, along with Property and Decedents' Estates and Trusts.
Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation A, Basic Income Taxation B, Decedents' Estates and Trusts, Property

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Estates and Future Interests Drafting Seminar (3)
540C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 491)
This is a three (3) hour course with enrollment limited to 15 students. The course is designed to provide an understanding of estates and future interests and how they are used in property transfers. Focus is on intensive in-class drafting of the carefully crafted language necessary for the creation of the various interests by deed, will or trust. The legal and practical consequences of each of the interests created are also studied. It is believed that the in-class drafting component makes for a greater comprehension of the materials. Accordingly, class attendance is strongly encouraged. The course will have a written final examination.

The subject matter of the course is one of examination both on the Multistate Bar Examination and many state essay examinations, including the Michigan Bar Examination. The course should have particular appeal to those who may practice in the areas of real estate law or estate planning.
Prerequisite(s):

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European Union Labor Law (1)
545B
Concentration(s):
This course provides an overview of EU labor law, including applicable rules on wages, hours, annual, sick and family leave, mass layoffs, employee mobility (the right of EU nationals to work in different EU member states), as well as non-discrimination (including race, gender, disability) principles. Special attention will be placed on the various differences between European and American labor law. Students will review pertinent European Union Directives and European Court of Justice decisions, among other materials, and will be given an understanding of how EU labor law is applied to the member states.
Prerequisite(s):

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European Union Law (3)
548C
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 447)
This course provides an introduction to the legal institutions of the European Economic Community. The subjects covered include the Treaty of Rome and other relevant legal instruments, the major institutions and characteristics of community law, internal community policies, external trade policies, competition law and the future of the community. A student may not take both this and Constitutional Law of the European Union.

Prerequisite(s):

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Evidence (4)
500P
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 220)
A study of the means and methods of proof or disproof of a proposition as either permitted, required or prohibited under the Anglo-American system of jurisprudence. The rules respecting problems of remoteness and prejudice of evidence, circumstantial proof, the employment of writings, their authentication and proof of their contents. A study in depth of hearsay evidence and its status in the evidence. A thorough inquiry into the so-called "evidential preferences" of our legal system and the deficiencies of hearsay evidence as related to these preferences.

Prerequisite(s):

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Family Law: Child, Family and the State (3)
541F
Concentration(s):
(Formerly Family Law II; Child, Family and the State) This course examines a host of issues confronting today's modern families. For example, we will discuss how to define family - including marriage and parenthood - in the 21st century. Some specific topics include: defining family for distribution of "family" benefits; balancing work and family; paternity; domestic violence; child abuse and neglect; surrogacy; adoption; and artificial insemination. Students may take Family Law: Child, Family, and State and Family Law: Marriage & Divorce in any order or at the same time.
Prerequisite(s):

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Family Law: Marriage & Divorce (3)
541E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly Family Law I: Marriage & Divorce) This course examines laws governing entry into marriage, access to divorce, the economics of divorce (property distribution, alimony and child support), child custody, premarital agreements, and cohabitation. Students may take Family Law: Marriage & Divorce and Family Law: Child, Family, and State in any order or at the same time.
Prerequisite(s):

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Federal Investigation and Prosecution (2)
616E
Concentration(s):
Students will be introduced to nearly all aspects of federal criminal investigation, including identifying crimes, analyzing constitutional requirements, using a Grand Jury, dealing with cooperators and informants, engaging in undercover operations, using electronic surveillance, choosing the correct charging procedure, obtaining search and arrest warrants, and managing ethical obligations in an investigation. Students will learn how to apply the evidence obtained from an investigation in a federal prosecution. Students will learn how to analyze complex statues, argue a detention hearing, engage in plea negotiations, apply the federal sentencing guidelines, advocate at trial and sentencing, and manage ethical obligations in a prosecution.
Prerequisite(s): Criminal Procedure I

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Federal Jurisdiction (3)
579G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 349)
(This is a 2 credit course when taken in Washington D.C.)The focus of this course is the operation of the federal court system. It will cover not only the usual bases of federal court jurisdiction, such as diversity, federal questions and removal, but also other doctrines that impact federal courts, including standing, ripeness, mootness, abstention and state sovereign immunity. Significant attention will be focused on federal litigation under the Civil Rights Acts. This course will be of benefit to those intending to practice in federal courts and to those seeking a federal court clerkship.

Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Civil Procedure II

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Federal Law and Indian Tribes (3)
635B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 486)
An examination of the law and policy of the United States regarding Indian tribes and their citizen members. Study the relationships between the federal, state, and tribal governments; and examine the source and scope of federal, state and tribal authority in Indian Country



Prerequisite(s):

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Food and Drug Law (2)
558B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 357)
This course is designed to provide a basic working knowledge of domestic laws regulating food, drugs, cosmetics, biologics/blood and medical devices. It has an administrative overtone, providing an understanding of the legislative and regulatory processes through an in-depth look at the relationship between the FDA, industry, consumer interest groups and Congress.

Prerequisite(s):

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Food Regulation in Asia (3)
810J
Concentration(s):
This online course provides students with an overview of the systems of food regulation practiced in Asia, including some of the cultural and social-economic factors which influence the regulation of food products in the specific region.
Prerequisite(s):

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Food Regulation in Canada (3)
810C
Concentration(s):
This course is designed for anyone who must understand the legal and regulatory complexities of the flow of food and agricultural products as they make their way from the farm gate to the grocery store shelves in Canada. This course will examine federal statutes and regulations including the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labeling Act, the Fish Inspection Act and the Meat Inspection Act.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Food Regulation in Latin America (3)
810G
Concentration(s):
This online course is designed to introduce food industry professionals and university level students to food law and regulation as it is currently practiced in Latin America. Perspectives from regulatory, commercial and consumer interests will be taken into account. The events taking place in Latin America in food law and regulation will be linked, when appropriate, to the broader movements underway in other regions and on an international basis.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Food Regulation in the European Union (3)
810B
Concentration(s):
This online course enables students to study the factors influencing the development of food regulation in the EU. By making full use of the internet, students will gain access to relevant documentation in support of their professional needs and, having followed the course, students will be able to make an informed interpretation of the content.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Food Regulation in the U.S. (3)
810A
Concentration(s):
An online course designed for anyone who must understand the legal and regulatory complexities of the regulation of food products in the United States including issues such as food and food safety regulation, regulatory compliance, HACCP, the regulation of genetic modifications, food additive regulation, food labeling, dietary supplements, the protection of the food supply, and the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act.

Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Foundations of Law (0)
530K
Concentration(s):
The primary focus of this course is to provide first-year students with an introduction to the study of law, with preliminary exposure to legal reasoning, the structure of the American legal system, and fundamental legal-theoretical concepts. This course also seeks to put students who come to the law from a variety of academic backgrounds on a more equal footing.
Prerequisite(s):

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Foundations of Law and Legal Research (3)
807A
Concentration(s):
This online course provides an introduction to the American legal system with a special focus on the research and writing needs of international scholars and non-lawyers (focus on American jurisprudence and).
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program or the Dubai M.J. Program.

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Franchise Law (2)
513
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 343)
This course provides an examination of the franchise relationship, including the role of trademarks, the statutory hallmark and remedy
provisions, and the government regulations which comprise the system for
distributing goods and services known as franchising. The IFA [International
Franchise Association] estimates that by "2005, franchising will become a $1
trillion-a-year industry, accounting for half of all retail sales."

Prerequisite(s):

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Frederick Douglas Team (0)
627D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL547)This course may be offered for 2-4 credits.
This is an inter-law school competition team. Enrollment is through invitation of the board.
Prerequisite(s):

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Gender, Power, Law & Leadership (2)
541P
Concentration(s):
This seminar will expose students to various theories of leadership and their intersections with gender, power and law. The semester will begin with an analysis of power structures through a gendered lens, observing the operation of masculinism and feminism within those structures, especially as they pertain to leadership. It will identify the traits and characteristics associated with leadership and power, and observe the leadership across all sectors of the legal profession, and related professions, through analysis of recent benchmarking research. The seminar will focus on both personal and organizational leadership, examine the various double binds facing women leaders, identify barriers and obstacles that have impeded women's advancement into leadership positions, analyze the ways in which leadership is conveyed in culture (vis a vis the media), and ultimately explore how power, gender and leadership intersect and operate in the fields of and law and politics. This seminar will consider whether gender impacts judicial decision making and political candidacy. Students will also read a biography of their choice during the semester featuring a transformative leader. Throughout the semester, students will learn, through the readings and class discussions,about various characteristics of leaders and organizational dynamics, further aiding them in their entrance into the powerful profession of law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Global Law Colloquium (0)
545D
Concentration(s):
This course offers a broad overview of key, contemporary international legal issues which will be presented by JD and LL.M. students. Students will read and comment upon student papers and presentations. Students will be evaluated on their presentations and abstracts of their topic. Students participating in the Colloquium for 3 credits through a Directed Study will be evaluated primarily on their research paper.
Prerequisite(s):

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Global Perspectives on Education Law (2)
545E
Concentration(s):
This course addresses a specific topic within the broader topic of public international human rights law: education. Countries around the world as well as prominent international treaties and covenants recognize that children have a right to education. The potential benefits of education are many: arguably, it can support the development of stable government, reduce inequalities among groups of people, promote individual economic well-being, contribute to overall economic development of societies, and ultimately help enable countries to become more powerful on the global stage. Law is regularly used by nation-states and by regional and global international bodies as a lever to advance these goals. Thus, this course will consider a range of international and comparative legal and policy choices.
Prerequisite(s):

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Global Perspectives on Women in Law (3)
541Q
Concentration(s):
This seminar will consider international dimensions of gender and the legal profession, including an examination of history, employment trends, practices and demographics within all sectors of the profession (the judiciary, private practice, the corporate world, academia and public service). The seminar will explore explanations of inequality - like bias and stereotypes - and will consider other obstacles that have impeded the advancement of women in the profession across continents. Biographical material on transformative women lawyers will also be included.

Prerequisite(s):

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Global Risk Regulation - Food Focus (3)
810Q
Concentration(s):
As more and more citizens come to reap the benefits of open trade on a global scale, as well as extended lifespan and high quality of life, they also seem to expect public authorities to deliver more protection against those threats, whether industrial or natural. Amid contemporary preoccupations with risks, managing threats to society has become one of the central tasks of governments. Due to their inherent global dimension, risks today call for global governance solutions. This course focuses on societies' efforts to assess and manage food, health, safety and environmental risks, including selection of the risks deserving regulatory attention, scientific advice and decision-making situations of scientific uncertainty, the role of non-scientific values, calculating costs and benefits of regulation, and distributional and equity effects.
Prerequisite(s): Intended for students in the Global Food Law program

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Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I (4)
630T
Concentration(s):
The Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic has three components. Students will teach First Amendment workshops to faculty advisors and student journalists at Michigan high schools covering censorship, libel, and privacy issues, as well as copyright and libel matters involving Facebook and Internet postings. Students also will provide pro bono legal representation to high school and community college journalists whose free speech rights have been challenged. In addition, clinic students will conduct a Freedom of Information Act survey of school district regulations that govern First Amendment rights of student journalists. Students will receive targeted instruction on First Amendment press issues on a weekly basis. As workshop instructors, students will use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings. Students will be responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once they are approved by a Law College faculty member and a high school teacher. In addition to class time, students must work a minimum of 12 hours each week in representing pro bono clients and preparing First Amendment workshops. Some travel time to high schools may be required. Students are selected to participate through an application process. NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisites: RWA I and II; (successful completion of Media Law is preferred, but not required)


Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic II (0)
630U
Concentration(s):
course description forthcoming
Prerequisite(s): Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I

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Health Care Fraud and Abuse (2)
558J
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 594)
The course will cover federal and state laws that impose criminal and civil penalties on health care providers for a variety of activities, ranging from payment for referrals to the submissions of false claims. The course would cover the federal and state illegal remuneration statutes, the federal civil monetary penalty and exclusion laws, the federal anti-referral (Stark) law, and the federal false claims laws as they apply to the health care industry.
Prerequisite(s):

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Health Care Law (2)
558C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 458)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
Survey of major aspects of substantive health care law and regulation. Topics include: 1) Health care economics, including the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, health insurance, Medicare and Medicaid; 2) Health facility regulation, including quality assurance programs, licensing and Medicare-imposed operational requirements; 3) Health professional (practitioner) regulation, including board certification, licensure, medical staff credentialing and corporate practice of medicine; 4) Managed care, including organizational structures, regulation, contracting practices and vicarious liability; 5) Regulation of human subject research; 6) Personal autonomy, surrogate decisionmakers and death and dying; 7) Kickback, Fraud and Abuse and Stark II regulation of referral patterns; 8) Corporate structure and federal tax exemption of health care institutions. Medical malpractice and tort liability will not be emphasized. A final examination is required.
Prerequisite(s):

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Health Care Organization, Reimbursement and Regulation (2)
558U
Concentration(s):
Health care is not only a human need and a professional calling, it is also a large and complex component of the American economy. This course addresses health care as a business. While it will entail some overlap with the health care survey course and Health Care Fraud and Abuse, it will delve more deeply into topics that the survey course treated more summarily. Areas addressed include the forms of business organization and governance employed by institutional and professional health care providers, tax exempt health care organizations, employment of professionals, capital formation, reimbursement of providers by public and private systems, regulation under both police and spending powers, common health care business transactions, and relevant recent legislation. Professional and institutional liability in tort will not be emphasized.
Prerequisite(s):

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Hospitality Law (2)

Concentration(s):
Students learn to identify and manage the legal issues raised by clients providing lodging, food, and alcohol to the public, with a focus on entrepreneurship and small business models, and particular attention to the intersection of local, state, and federal regulation. Topics would include choice of business form, duties to guests and others, food and alcohol regulation, lodging and land use regulation. The course will include several case studies requiring students to consider clients’ business plans and provide appropriate legal analysis and advice.
Prerequisite(s): Torts (Law 500R) and Contracts (Law 530B)

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Housing Law and the Public Interest (2)
603B
Concentration(s):
This is an introductory course that focuses on the significant laws, cases and policies formulated in the 21st century to address housing issues in the United States. The focus is on laws that were a response to economic, racial, and immigration issues and laws and policies designed to provide more access and opportunity to obtain safe, fair, and affordable housing. The course will examine legal and policy areas relating to housing and the problem of providing housing to the population in an effort to bring the issue of a society providing housing for its citizens full circle.
Prerequisite(s):

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Housing Law Clinic I (4)
630V
Concentration(s):
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic I - LAW 630A)

Housing Law Clinic I is a comprehensive housing clinic that will cover a variety of housing areas for students. Students will have the opportunity to master the basics of local landlord-tenant law, and to focus on how the clinic can best serve the community in the housing area based upon the overall needs of the community and the problems facing consumers with respect to their housing choices. Other areas of clinic development and student advocacy will entail, but will not be limited to, foreclosures, fair housing, affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness. Students can be expected to be assigned actual clients with housing problems and will, with supervision, act as legal counsel for these clients in a variety of settings. This will include advocacy in local housing courts and judicial tribunals in the state of Michigan. However, students will be mainly trained to be advocates, in and out of a judicial setting, with the overall goal to provide the student with a more expansive and well-rounded experience regarding housing law in a legal education setting. Students also will have the opportunity to consider other areas of housing advocacy where they might be able to have an impact on the lives of consumers, and will be supervised and supported in pursuing these goals on behalf of consumers.



Enrollment in Housing Law Clinic I is by application only. Details about the application process will be provided to students in advance of each semester's enrollment period. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student works between 12-15 hours weekly in addition to instructional time). NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory orientation session that will likely take place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.


Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II,Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy

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Housing Law Clinic II (4)
630W
Concentration(s):
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic II - LAW 630B)

Housing Law Clinic II provides an opportunity for students, upon approval of the supervising faculty, to continue work Housing Law Clinic. The selected students will be expected to provide support and work more independently than students enrolled in Housing Law Clinic I. Expectations are high and ongoing projects and cases that these students are engaged in will be a core responsibility.


Prerequisite(s): Housing Law Clinic I, Rental Housing Clinic I

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Immigration Law (2)
541G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 353)
This course provides a general overview of U.S. immigration law and policy. The course will examine the admission, exclusion, deportation and naturalization of noncitizens in the United States, from constitutional foundations to daily practice issues. The course also will explore the rights of immigrants in employment, education, and public benefits, and will analyze the interaction of immigration law with other areas of law such as criminal law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Immigration Law Clinic I (6)
630R
Concentration(s):
Students engage with immigrant communities through direct client representation and systemic advocacy. The Immigration Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to experience the practice of law in a well-supervised and academically rigorous program that both prepares them for the practice of law and enables them to critically assess social justice issues. In addition to client representation and advocacy, students participate in a clinic seminar. Students are required to work an average of 20 hours per week. Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for details of application process).
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II or Research, Writing & Analysis, Advocacy

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Immigration Law Clinic II (0)
630S
Concentration(s):
A supplement to Immigration Law Clinic I, open to students who have successfully completed Immigration Law Clinic I, and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Students work on a clinic-based project developed in consultation with the professor. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of one to three credits.
Prerequisite(s): Immigration Law Clinic I
Prerequisite(s): Immigration Law Clinic I

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Indigenous Law and Policy Center (3)
630F
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 625)
This experiential learning course addresses the issues involved in
creating and operating tribal judiciaries, and the federal, state, and
tribal tax laws that affect tribal governance. Students learn about the
appellate process in tribal court systems, including preparation of
bench memoranda for pending cases in tribal appellate courts. Students
also have the opportunity to assist in developing tribal court
structures and improving tribal court administration. In addition,
students assist in drafting tribal tax codes, creating administrative
tax tribunals, and handling tax controversies for qualifying clients.
Other projects may include legislative and policy work for tribal
governments, including drafting and revising tribal laws and providing
legal assistance regarding land tenure systems.

Prerequisite(s):

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Indigenous Law and Policy Center II (3)
630G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 625A)
Prerequisite(s):

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Insurance Law (2)
514
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 379)
This course will offer a student of general topics such as (1) scope and function of insurance, (2) relation of insurer and insured, (3) construction of insurance contracts, (4) governmental regulation of insurance, (5) insurance agency and (6) broad categories of insurance coverage (property, person and liability). Specific areas of study will include insurance of automobiles, homes, commercial property and professional conduct, as well as special topics such as coordination-of-benefits, stacking, subrogation, errors and omissions, environmental coverage, duty-to-defend/reservation of rights, coverage litigation and bad faith/settlement issues. The primary method of instruction will be case study using traditional Socratic classroom techniques with open discussion. The course text will be supplemented with the most recent published appellate cases of significance. The instructor would seek to invite occasional guest lecturers on specific topics from time to time.
Prerequisite(s):

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Integrative Law & Social Work (3)
541J
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 474)
The Integrative Law and Social Work Seminar is offered only to law students
and second year master-level social work students accepted into the one-year
Chance at Childhood Program which begins each fall semester.

The spring course is a continuation of this two semester seminar that is
part of the Chance at Childhood Certificate Program. The certificate
program is designed to strengthen the knowledge base, practice and advocacy
skills of law students and master-level social work students interested in
working with abused, neglected and at-risk children and families. The
seminar emphasizes select issues related to child abuse and neglect from a
multi-disciplinary perspective.

Major: CHLD.

Must be in the Child and Family Advocacy Certificate program.
Prerequisite(s):

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Intellectual Property Law (0)
533V
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 321)

See Intellectual Property Survey.
Prerequisite(s):

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Intellectual Property Practicum (1)
535F
Concentration(s):
This class will revolve around the skills that young intellectual property attorneys are often forced to learn on the job while in practice as taught by practicing attorneys. Classes may involve lecture or class exercises as the topic dictates. The focus of the practicum will vary depending on practicing attorney availability. Assignments will encompass many types of topic-appropriate readings, including cases, practitioner guides, and CLE materials. Students are recommended to have taken either Patent Law, Intellectual Property Survey, or Patent Application Drafting.
Prerequisite(s): Patent Law or Intellectual Property Survey or Patent Application Preparation

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Intellectual Property Start-Up Project (0)
631A
Concentration(s):
Students will examine a diverse range of legal intellectual property law issues infused with pedagogical opportunity. Students will be required to engage in sophisticated factual and legal analyses and to broaden their horizons in learning how to problem-solve on behalf of their clients. Start-Up Project students will not simply learn legal skills through their efforts – they will experience aspects of lawyering that are not gleaned from other environments. By engaging in in-depth interviews with their clients, exploring cutting-edge intellectual property law issues and their various dimensions, forming plans and recommendations, and executing work, students will be forced to continuously reflect on the role of attorneys within the legal system. In particular, students will face a client with an invention and will have to provide guidance as to its patentability. This requires application of relevant patent law (subject matter, novelty, obviousness analyses) and prior art searches. Students may then proceed with the drafting of an actual patent. Enrollment is by permission only

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites:
Research, Writing and Analysis
Advocacy
Patent Law

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Intellectual Property Survey (3)
535D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 321 and LAW 533V)

Formerly known as Intellectual Property Law. This course could be offered for 2 or 3 credits.
This course is a survey of all Intellectual Property law, including patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secret law. No technical degree is necessary.

Prerequisite(s): This course is not open to students who have taken 2 of the 3 following courses: Copyright Law, Patent Law, or Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law.

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Intellectual Property Thesis (0)
808A
Concentration(s):
This course is only open to foreign LL.M. students. The thesis in intellectual property law provides the opportunity for those already possessing a foreign law degree or in the last stages of their legal education in a foreign country to write a major research paper under the supervision of a professor with expertise in the field. The thesis is designed to meet degree requirements of foreign law schools or jurisdictions, which require a major scholarly work for degree award or bar admission. Permission of instructor required.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Alternative Dispute Resolution (0)
512N
Concentration(s):
The two main types of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) - arbitration and mediation - have had a long history of development in the United States (US). However, the use of both forms of ADR at the international level has increased exponentially in recent years, and the rules applicable to international arbitration and mediation have developed quite differently than in the US. This course will examine the law and procedure of international ADR, with a focus on ADR in the European Union (EU) and its similarities and differences with US ADR law. The New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards will be covered, along with the procedural rules of the major ADR service providers, especially the International Chamber of Commerce and the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, and the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) arbitration rules. With respect to mediation, the UNCITRAL mediation rules will be analyzed, together with applicable EU mediation law. Special attention will be given to the national mediation laws of East European states.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Business Transactions (2)
512B
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 363)This course is an introduction to international business transactions. We will explore the following general topics: agreements for the international trading of goods, financing the international sale of goods, establishing and operating a foreign investment, the resolution of international business disputes and enforcement of dispute settlement awards.
Prerequisite(s): Public International Law

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International Commercial Arbitration (3)
512K
Concentration(s):
International commercial arbitration is the most popular alternative dispute settlement mechanism for resolving disputes between parties arising out of international commercial transactions. The basic goal of this course is to give students a thorough understanding of the international commercial arbitration process and the role of national courts in supporting that process. The rules of international commercial arbitration institutions, such as the International Chamber of Commerce, and international conventions on commercial arbitration will be studied, including the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards. The UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration -- enacted by more than 60 countries -- will also be examined.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I

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International Corporate Governance (2)
508K
Concentration(s):
Corporate Governance involves the set of relationships among a company’s management, its board, its shareholders and its other stakeholders. The scope of these “other stakeholders” has been expanding dramatically in recent years, albeit at different rates and with differing results depending upon the jurisdiction. This term currently includes employees, suppliers, creditors, the surrounding communities, the environment, workers within the company’s supply chain and an ever-evolving panoply of additional parties with an interest in the operations and performance of the company. This course focuses on the broadening scope of such stakeholders in different jurisdictions and the impact of these developments on the internal governance of companies in those jurisdictions.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Environmental Law (3)
548E
Concentration(s):I
(Formerly DCL 417)
This course introduces the student to the use of bilateral and multilateral treaties and other international mechanisms for dealing with international environmental problems such as ozone in the upper atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, destruction of forest and trade in endangered species. Normally, a paper is required.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Food Laws and Regulations (3)
810D
Concentration(s):
The objective of this online course is to provide the student with an overview of the systems of food regulation practiced in different regions of the world including some of the cultural and social-economic factors which influence the regulation of food products in the specific region including issues such as genetic modification, importation, exportation, food additives, and regulatory compliance.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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International Human Rights (2)
548F
Concentration(s):
(Formerlty DCL 418)
This course explores human rights and the international legal order, background, concepts and the future. It will also consider major international agreements and their relation to local law, and remedies for the implementation of human rights.

Prerequisite(s):

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International Intellectual Property Law (2)
533E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 526)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
International Intellectual Property Law begins with overview of copyright, patents, trademarks and trade secrets under U.S. law, then looks at rapidly developing treaty regimes, reciprocal international legislation, and international cases for the protection of literary and artistic works and scientific invention, and ownership issues in the global markets that affect the rights of authors and inventors.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Law Colloquium (0)

Concentration(s):
Course description forthcoming pending faculty approval
Prerequisite(s):

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International Sale of Goods (2)
548G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 478)
A study of international sales law under the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). Similarities and contrasts with sales law under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code will be investigated. Also addressed are the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts.

Prerequisite(s):

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International Taxation (2)
548J
Concentration(s):
The course will explore issues of tax policy in a variety of settings with the hope of providing students with the background necessary to understand basic tax principles as well as to contribute to the formation of tax laws and policies at home and abroad.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Trade Regulation (3)
512E
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 368)
The course has as its primary focus the international trade regime of the World Trade Organization to which the United States and 144 other countries are parties. The following topics are covered in this course:

- Introduction: Why trade? Why not protect?
- An overview of the GATT-WTO system
- WTO dispute settlement
- The unconditional, most-favored-nation obligation
- Tariff bindings
- The national treatment obligation
- The prohibition on quantitative restrictions (quotas)
- Transparency of national laws and regulations
- Regional trade arrangements (customs unions and free trade areas)
- Special and differential treatment of developing countries
- Trade in agricultural goods, including farm subsidies
- Trade and the environment
- Human, animal, and plant health and safety issues
- Trade and labor rights
- The General Agreement on Trade in Services
- The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights
- The new agenda: trade and investment, trade and competition policy
Prerequisite(s):

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Introduction to Comparative Law (1)

Concentration(s):
Course description forthcoming pending faculty approval
Prerequisite(s):

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Introduction to Islamic Law (1)
545F
Concentration(s):
The study of Islamic legal philosophy and the historical evolution of Islamic legal and jurisprudential systems that will include origins, nature, sources, and interpretive methodologies of classical Islamic law, and the main institution for upholding this law, the madhhab, or school of law, examining its development from the formative to the post-formative periods and highlighting important controversies generated along the way; Early encounter of Islamic law with modernity; and Exploration of several contemporary topics that have served as catalysts for new tensions and alternative approaches and interpretive theories.
Prerequisite(s):

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Introduction to Public International Law (1)
512P
Concentration(s):
The course is designed to introduce students to the specifics of the public international law with special emphasis on the sources of international law. Particular problems covered in each class are described below. Students will use class materials provided for them by the instructor (i.e. print outs of the power point presentations), class discussion, analysis of the opinions and judgments of the International Court of Justice and arbitration decisions, as well as work in groups will be used as instructing methods in addition to the elements of lecture.
Prerequisite(s):

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Investor Advocacy Clinic I (6)
631B
Concentration(s):
The Investor Advocacy Clinic (the “IAC”) exposes second and third year law students to securities litigation and regulation under the supervision of a licensed attorney. In addition to gaining securities and financial products litigation experience, students will learn about the regulatory organizations governing financial institutions and serve as important community resources by providing investor education. Although the caseload will vary each semester, students will draft arbitration and mediation materials and may litigate, mediate, settle, arbitrate or try cases. Students may also research and draft comment letters to provide analyses on proposed rules and regulations and will make community presentations about investor and financial protection topics. Clinic seminars will take two forms: topical and case rounds. Topical sessions focus on substantive law, procedure, policy or lawyering issues and will generally involve discussion of assigned reading or in-class exercises to highlight particular issues. Case rounds provide an opportunity to respond to legal, ethical, professional or policy issues arising in case work. Admission to the Investor Advocacy Clinic is by application only and requires a substantial time commitment of approximately twenty hours per week.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, or Advocacy, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Investor Advocacy Clinic II (6)
631C
Concentration(s):
This is a continuing opportunity for students who have successfully completed coursework in Investor Advocacy Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills and to assume greater responsibility with client matters. It also provides for assignment of more complex issues and an opportunity to assist with mentoring of Clinic I students.
Open to students who have successfully completed Investor Advocacy Clinic I and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of one to six credits (as agreed to by the Clinic Director), depending upon the student's participation level. The number of working hours required will be dependent on the credit hours determined.
Prerequisite(s): Investor Advocacy Clinic I

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Japanese Legal System (2)
512M
Concentration(s):
This course is a study of the Japanese Legal System. The course will provide an overview of the structure of the Japanese Legal System, the place of the legal system within the broader governmental system in Japan, Japanese Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Business Law and Civil Law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Jessup Team (2)
627E
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 405)
An international inter-school competition in international law, held annually in the spring semester. Team membership is by invitation on the basis of performance in the Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. Participants receive two graded credit hours.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis, Transnational Legal Research

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Journal of Animal Law (2)
629C
Concentration(s):
The Journal of Animal Law was the second legal journal established in North America specializing in animal law and is currently one of only three existing that is dedicated to the specialized topic of animal law. The Journal of Animal Law has been able to welcome editors from other ABA-accredited law schools in addition to MSU College of Law.

The goals of the Journal of Animal Law are:
-To provide volumes of legal policy materials that relate to animal law and animal welfare.
-To provide expert explanation of the materials for both legal and non-legal audiences.
-To be an education resource for both the lawyer and the non-lawyer.
-To provide historical perspective about social and legal attitudes toward animals, and how we as a society have arrived at its present perspective.

Students must satisfy the following criteria to receive Journal credit: (1) two year participation on the Journal staff/board; (2)editing and cite-checking of papers submitted to the Journal; (3)satisfy editing obligation during the first-year on Journal staff; (4)election to Journal board for final year at the Law College; and (5) fulfill leadership obligations of Board position.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Journal of Business and Securities Law (1)
629D
Concentration(s):
The Journal of Business and Securities Law is an independent, student-run organization. Its purpose is to provide insight into legal issues surrounding the business community through legal analysis and other types of publications such as articles, personal narratives, and commentary. In furthering this purpose, the Journal accepts submissions written by active members of the legal community, faculty of established law schools, and other members of the legal profession. Additionally, the Journal accepts student contributions, including selected submissions from its Editorial Board and general members. The Journal anticipates a wide scope of topics on legal business issues such as corporate litigation, commercial transactions, employment, ecommerce, securities regulation, and any other topic focusing on the intersection of law and business.
Prerequisites: Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II OR Research, Writing & Analysis, and Advocacy

Prerequisite(s):

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Journal of International Law (2)
629A
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 550)
Participation by writing competition upon satisfactory completion by day students of two full semesters and by evening students of three full semesters. Two credits of ungraded credit earned upon completion of a student article, a comment, required production work and participation in the organization of the International Law Symposium and the International Achievement Award Dinner.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Journal of Medicine and Law (2)
629B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 407)
Two credits may be awarded to a member of the journal during the student's final semester if the student has completed a student article and a Regional Reporter article; satisfactorily completed all work assignments, training sessions, cite check workshops and assignments; and attended all mandatory meetings; participated in the organization of a journal event; actively participated in at least one committee per semester. Prior to registering for credit, a Journal member must obtain authorization by the editor-in-chief, and present authorization to the Office of the Registrar during enrollment.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Juvenile Law (2)
541K
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 378)
A survey of the law related to juvenile courts in the areas of delinquency and child neglect, including jurisdiction and waivers thereof, arrest, pre-trial, and trial procedure and disposition.

Prerequisite(s):

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King Scholars Jurisprudence (2)
626C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 359)
Prerequisite: King Scholar A course in jurisprudence available to King Scholars as part of the King Scholarship Program.

Students entering with a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Jurisprudence class during their third semester at the Law College. Matriculating students receiving a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Jurisprudence class in their next regular semester.

Prerequisite(s):

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King Scholars Program (0)
626B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 191) Students who have a King Scholarship will be enrolled for King Scholars each semester by the Office of the Registrar.
Prerequisite(s):
-King Scholars Program

Prerequisite(s): King Scholars Program

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King Scholars Seminar (2)
626D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 404)
Students who have a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Senior Paper course in their last regular semester at the Law College.

Prerequisite(s): King Scholars Jurisprudence

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Labor Law (3)
511D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 382)
This is a basic labor law course exploring the application of the National Labor Relations Act as amended. Subjects include the jurisdiction, organization and procedures of the National Labor Relations Board; the protection of the right of self-organization; company domination of or assistance to the union; discrimination against employees; remedies for unfair labor practices; review of the procedures for selection of representatives for the purposes of collective bargaining; securing bargaining rights through unfair labor practice procedures; and the law concerning negotiation of collective bargaining agreements, including the subjects of collective bargaining, strikes, boycotts and picketing under the common law and the act.

Prerequisite(s):

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Land Use Planning (3)
566B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 401)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
Explores the principal methods of local government control of land use, with special emphasis on the theory and practice of zoning and eminent domain. Analyzes judicial response, through the use of nuisance and "takings" doctrines, to local land use planning efforts.
Prerequisite(s): Property

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Law and Economics (3)
515
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 443)
Law and Economics, (alternatively named "the economics of legal relationships" or perhaps more accurately, "the economic analysis of law") is defined as the application of economic theory – primarily microeconomics and the basic concepts of welfare economics – to examine the formation, structure, processes, and the economic impact of law and legal institutions. The purpose of this course is to: (1) provide a brief review of microeconomic theory sufficient to (2) undertake a survey (the history, the people, and their ideas) of the dominant schools of thought that comprise the field of Law and Economics including i) the Chicago approach to law and economics, ii) the New Haven school, iii) public choice theory, iv) social norms and Law and Economics, v) Austrian law and economics, vi) institutional law and economics, and vii) the new institutional economics. Each of these schools of thought places a significant emphasis on the interrelations between law and economy. The goal is to have you understand the jurisprudential niche occupied by these several schools of thought and their impact on present-day legal scholarship... to get a sense of the “lay of the land;” no attempt is made to critique the schools or the ideas contained therein. The materials covered in this class are of fundamental importance not only for those working in the fields of economics and law, but also to those in the contiguous disciplines of political science, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. Prerequisite: an understanding of the principles of microeconomics.
Prerequisite(s): After taking this course, students may not take Analytical Methods for Lawyers - Microeconomics (509A), nor may they be taken concurrently.

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Law and Literature (3)
548T
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 462)
In this course, students read and discuss literature to examine issues that exist at the heart of law, such as the conflict between a legal system and other norms, retribution and revenge, the role of deliberation and emotion in (legal) decisions, the genesis of law in the community, comedy, plural voices, and other literary and legal questions. Grades are based on class participation; short, written student reactions to literature and law assigned; and a choice of either 1) choosing, assigning, and leading a class on a literary work (conceived broadly to include film, music, and other texts) and associated law or 2) writing a final paper. Topics for assignments and papers must be approved by the professor. Past classes have read: Aeschylus, Plato, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Locke, Hobbes, Twain, murder ballads, Coetzee, dark poetry, and other texts.
Prerequisite(s):

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Law and Policy of Corrections (0)
579T
Concentration(s):
This course could be offered for 2 or 3 credits.
This is a course on applied or advanced constitutional law in the context of prisoners and pretrial detainees. The first part of the course will provide an introduction to punishment and sentencing. The second part of the course provides a survey of the constitutional law of incarceration, including materials on procedural and substantive due process, equal protection, the ban on cruel and unusual punishment, First Amendment protections, and rights of access to the courts and attorneys. The final section considers the mechanics of prisoners' rights litigation under Section 1983.
Prerequisite(s):

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Law and Religion (3)
579K
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 530)
This course will focus on church/state law -- the legal doctrines that have arisen in cases under the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. The course will explore the role of law in various religious traditions and the role of religion in law and public discourse. Topics addressed include school prayer, government aid to religious institutions (including school vouchers and charitable choice), government endorsement of religious symbols, the role of public forum doctrine in religion cases, freedom of religious expression, and the freedom to practice one's religion.
Prerequisite(s):

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Law Externship (3)
625A
Concentration(s):
An externship is a voluntary, for-credit opportunity with government agencies, judiciary, and non-profit or public interest agencies. Students are able to complete two 3-credit externships during their law school careers, if desired, after earning 24 law school credits. Externships require a minimum of 12-15 hours per week, for the duration of the semester, a bi-weekly report of legal work performed, a mid-semester seminar, and a final paper. The Career Services Office holds informational meetings each semester about the Externship Program. Additional information regarding externships is found at http://www.law.msu.edu/career/externships.html
Students who have earned six (6) credits in the Canadian Summer Externship Program in Ottawa (course 634) are not eligible to enroll in another externship.

Prerequisite(s):

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Law Practice Innovation and Entrepreneurship (0)
537F
Concentration(s):
This course offers training about the evolving world of technology in legal services delivery and provides students with an understanding of these trends and how they might capitalize on them in modern law practice or in the development of their own legal technology. Please note that this course assumes students may (or may not) arrive with a range of experience in the use of technology—we will provide training for everything needed to succeed in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Law Practice Management (2)
592
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 309)
This course is designed to provide an overview of the issues involved in managing a law office. These include forms of practice (partnership, professional corporation, sole practitioners), personnel issues, physical requirements, computers, financial management, practice development and ethical issues. Also covered are various law office systems: docket, tickler, trust accounting, timekeeping, etc. It is recommended that students take the Professional Responsibility course before or concurrently with Law Practice Management.

Prerequisite(s): Professional Responsibility

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Law Review (4)
628
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 790)

Prerequisites: RWA I and II, credits completed and GPA

Participation is by invitation or writing competition upon satisfactory completion by full-time students of two full semesters and by part-time students of three full semesters. Four semester hours of ungraded credit earned upon successful completion of a casenote, a comment and all required production work.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Lawyer Ethics and Regulation in a Technology-Driven World (3)
537J
Concentration(s):
This course prepares the law student to address the many obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives in the context of a technology-driven world. This class focuses on the Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ethical problems involved in the practice of law. An overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students will also consider the unique professional conduct concerns and opportunities presented by technology in law practice. This course provides background preparation for taking the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam. This class satisfies the 3 credit upper level Professional Responsibility requirement. Students who have already taken Professional Responsibility may not take this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Lawyers & Ethics (1)
530C
Concentration(s):
The course is taught in the first-year and supplements the required upper-level required Professional Responsibility course. The course exposes first-year students to the ethical philosophy necessary for making decisions in life, law school, and law practice.
Prerequisite(s):

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Legal Analysis, Practice Application and Writing (1)
600B
Concentration(s):
The course format focuses on teaching analysis and writing skills for answering Multistate Essay Exam (MEE) questions and drafting legal documents for the Multistate Performance Test (MPT). Students will work on the skills necessary to organize and present answers to maximize points awarded by the examiners. Students will do simulation questions with answers graded by former bar exam graders. Additionally, random student answers will be critiqued with the class to identify strengths and weaknesses. The course is recommended to students taking the bar exam where both exams are administered (e.g., Illinois, Colorado, District of Columbia Missouri, Utah and Wisconsin). It will also be helpful to students taking the bar exam where the MPT is administered (e.g., New York, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Georgia, Indiana, Maryland, Minnesota, and Nevada). Attendance and participation in all sessions is required to obtain credit for the course. Only graduating third year students are eligible to enroll in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Legal Analytics (2)
537N
Concentration(s):
This course is designed to train students to efficiently manage, collect, explore and analyze various forms of legal data. Its purpose is to imbue students with the capability to:(1) understand the process of extracting knowledge from data with specific applications to domains such as legal prediction; (2) distinguish themselves in legal proceedings involving data or analysis;(3) distinguish themselves in firm management matters;(4) understand and communicate with information and software sector clients; and(5) use data to manage outside resources such as LPO or eDiscovery providers.Students will be introduced to sophisticated statistical techniques including machine learning and natural language processing.

Prerequisite(s): Quantitative Analysis for Lawyers (637E) or with professor permission alternative prior experience with data/statistics.

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Legal English I for Foreign Lawyers (3)
804A
Concentration(s):
Legal English I is designed to provide practice for foreign lawyers in the fundamental skills of written legal English and common law analysis in the United States. Students in Legal English I will draft a variety of legal documents and participate in a variety of oral exercises and presentations.
Prerequisite(s):

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Legal English II for Foreign Lawyers (3)
804B
Concentration(s):
Enrollment in this course is by invitation only from the legal writing program faculty. Participants are foreign lawyers whose English language skills, even after participation in Common Law Reasoning, remain a significant impediment to their ability to reason from legal texts in English or a significant impediment to assessment of their legal reasoning. Students will draft a variety of legal documents and participate in a variety of oral exercises and presentations. The course has four modules. The writing specialist will teach one class period per module, covering basic English skills, such as sentence structure. Students will write for, or give presentations in, almost every class. Students will attend a minimum of one required conference with the writing specialist and one required conference with the professor.
Prerequisite(s):

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Legal Information Engineering & Technology (1)
537A
Concentration(s):
This course highlights the increasing role of legal information technology in the law practice of today (and the not too distant future). Students will be exposed to a number emerging approaches in legal automation, process engineering, informatics / ‘soft’ artificial intelligence (e-discovery, automated document generation), supply chain management, and quantitative legal prediction.
Prerequisite(s):

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Legal Services Act and UK Deregulation (1)
537C
Concentration(s):
This course exposes students to the history and impact of the Legal Services Act and deregulation of the profession in the UK with a focus on how the resulting innovations (both regulatory changes and new legal services delivery mechanisms that follow) might be exported to the US. This course will include a roundtable discussion with members of the Legal Services Board and a tour of relevant London legal institutions. Also encompassed in this course will be a comparative overview of American and British law governing lawyers and law practice.

Prerequisite(s):

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Legislation (3)
579P
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 329)
This course starts with the premise that understanding the legislative process is important for sophisticated legal analysis in an age of legislation. The course therefore studies different theories of the legislative process, as well as the accompanying doctrines and theories of statutory interpretation. It also examines structures of representative democracy and deliberative decision making, including the principle of "one person, one vote," reapportionment of legislative districts, term limits, the line-item veto, and regulations of campaign finance. Finally, the course considers the use of direct democracy as an alternative to republican government and examines the role of administrative agencies in the implementation and interpretation of statutes. By the end of the semester, students will have a greater understanding of the various public law institutions in the United States, their relationships to one another, and how this knowledge can be used to construct persuasive arguments regarding the application of positive law to particular legal problems.
Prerequisite(s):

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Legislative Drafting (2)
579M
Concentration(s):
Legislation, whether it is public legislation such as constitutional provisions, statutes, administrative rules, or regulatory orders or private legislation such as wills, contracts, leases, or trusts, has come to have a greater impact on everyday life than the common law. This has resulted in a greater need for attorneys who have developed the unique set of skills required for legislative drafting. This course provides students with an introduction to legislative drafting, particularly in the realm of public legislation.
The course will explore the history of legislative drafting; the process of legislative drafting; legislative procedure; and the language, structure, and grammar of legislation. By the end of the course, students should have acquired the basic skills needed to draft legislation, whether as a general practitioner, public interest group attorney, lobbyist, legislator, or legislative staff member.
Prerequisite(s):

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Licensing Intellectual Property (2)
533F
Concentration(s):Intellectual Property
(Formerly DCL 516)
The class focuses on managing an intellectual property portfolio to maximize a client's return on investment in intellectual property assets. Unlike other intellectual property courses that focus on obtaining intellectual property rights, the scope of those rights, and the remedies for infringing, this course emphasizes the identification, valuation, and management of intellectual property assets both as a source of revenue and as part of a larger offensive or defensive litigation strategy. Topics covered also include intellectual property assets, management, and licensing in the context of tax and antitrust law. Students will be required to draft part of a license agreement or agreement to transfer ownership of an intellectual property asset. Time permitting, this course will also cover cross-border intellectual property transactions. At the conclusion of this course, a student should appreciate the role of intellectual property as part of creation and management of a larger enterprise.
Prerequisite(s):

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Litigation: Data, Theory, Practice, Process (2)
537M
Concentration(s):
The primary goal of this class is for students to learn how to leverage data, theory, and process to obtain better results in litigation. Students will explore sources of data and the use of decision theory, game theory, and economic analysis to evaluate claims, predict outcomes, and improve litigation strategies. The litigation process will be deconstructed beyond the mechanics of procedural rules and into the specific tasks lawyers must perform. Deconstructing the litigation process allows lawyers to properly staff matters, complete tasks more efficiently, and demonstrate the marginal return on investment for each task. Students will also learn a number of practical skills necessary to be an effective litigator. Among the topics addressed are early case assessment, client counseling, settlement negotiations, drafting persuasive pleadings and motions, managing discovery, persuading the fact finder, managing litigation projects, budgeting, and developing effective value-added litigation strategies.
Prerequisite(s):

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Matrimonial Practice (3)
541M
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 532)
This course provides the practical knowledge and skills necessary to develop expertise in handling matrimonial matters from initial client contact through each step of the proceedings, including Motion Practice and Temporary Orders, Discovery, Custody, Equitable Distribution, Support, Negotiations/Settlement, Mediation, and Settlement Drafting.
Prerequisite(s):

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Media Law (2)
533G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 301)
This class will focus on free press/free speech issues and the mass media. Subjects will include the 1st Amendment rights of reporters in print, broadcast and online journalism, as well as news gatherers' privilege, obscenity issues, and freedom of information and open meetings laws. Students will examine defamation claims involving media defendants, copyright issues facing journalists, as well privacy torts such as false light and appropriation claims. The class will also study the ethical and professional considerations of journalists.
Prerequisite(s):

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Mediation Advocacy and Civil Facilitative Mediator Training (3)
587E
Concentration(s):
This course meets the civil facilitative mediator training requirement as required by Michigan Court Rule and the Michigan State Court Administrative Office (SCAO). With this training, and the completion of additional requirements, students will be able to apply for inclusion on court mediation rosters. The course includes a variety of graded assignments, including drafting an agreement to mediate (with adequate confidentiality provisions), a post-mediation agreement (with mediation clause), and a mediation representation plan. By balancing theory with practice and paying particular attention to mediation ethics, students completing this course will be prepared to both mediate civil cases and effectively advocate for clients in mediation. Students who have taken Mediation Advocacy and Domestic Relations Mediator Training may not take this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Mediation Advocacy and Domestic Relations Mediator Training (3)
587F
Concentration(s):
This course meets the domestic relations mediator training requirement as required by Michigan Court Rule and the Michigan State court Administrative Office (SCAO). With this training, and the completion of additional requirements, students will be able to apply for inclusion on court mediation rosters. The course includes a variety of graded assignments, including drafting an agreement to mediate (with adequate confidentiality provisions), a post-mediation agreement (with mediation clause), and a mediation representation plan. By balancing theory with practice and paying particular attention to mediation ethics, students completing this course will be prepared to both mediate domestic relations cases and effectively advocate for clients in mediation. Students who have taken Mediation Advocacy and Civil Facilitative Mediator Training may not take this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Medical Malpractice Litigation (2)
558R
Concentration(s):
Introduction to national and state concepts as well as substantive and procedural issues in medical malpractice cases. This includes proving the standard of care, informed consent, scientific evidence, expert witnesses, damages claims including caps, and defense topics.
Prerequisite(s):

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Medical-Legal Problems (2)
558F
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 306)
A study of the relationship between law and medicine including medical-legal problems that arise from staff privileges of physicians, rules governing Medicare, HEW regulations and joint problems arising out of the medical management of patients.

Prerequisite(s):

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Mergers and Acquisitions (3)
516
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 505)
Overview of issues relating to business combinations. The course includes a transactional perspective on mergers and acquisitions, with some consideration of the social and economic significance of business combinations. Attention will be paid to relevant statutes, negotiation, acquisition documents, valuation methodologies, and characteristic problems in negotiated acquisitions, in addition to careful examination of takeover defenses and Delaware case law. Simulations and drafting exercises may be a component.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

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Michigan Civil Procedure (2)
593A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 438)
This course is a survey of Michigan civil procedure at the trial and appellate levels. The purpose of the course is to acquaint students who intend to practice in Michigan with the nuances of state procedural law. Focus will be placed on the differences between the Michigan court rules and the federal rules of civil procedure. Also, the subject matter jurisdiction of the various courts within the state system, as well as Michigan's long-arm statute, will be examined.

Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Civil Procedure II

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Michigan Legal Analysis and Writing (1)
600A
Concentration(s):
The course format focuses on teaching analysis and writing skills for answering the Michigan Bar Examination essay questions. Students will be exposed to the skills necessary to organize and present answers to maximize points awarded by the examiners. Students will do simulation questions with answers graded by former Michigan bar exam graders. Additionally, random student answers will be critiqued with the entire class to identify strengths and weaknesses. Attendance and participation in all sessions is required to obtain credit for the course. Only graduating third year students are eligible to enroll in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Michigan Statutory Personal Injury Practice (1)
600C
Concentration(s):
The course will examine the key statutory provisions necessary to analyze Michigan personal injury cases including: no-fault, automobile negligence, owner's liability, dram shop, wrongful death, governmental immunity, and workers' compensation, and the major cases interpreting the statutory provisions. Only graduating third year students are eligible to enroll in this course. The course is not available to students who have previously taken Torts II.
Prerequisite(s):

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Military Justice (2)
545G
Concentration(s):
This course studies the procedures, practices, laws, regulations, rules, and roles of judge advocates and military courts in the federal criminal justice system. These practices are increasingly relevant to those outside of the military because they have been expanded to certain civilians serving abroad; adopted as a model for trying detainees in places like Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; and are being exported as a guide for the military justice systems of emerging democracies around the world.
Prerequisite(s):

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Moot Court Board (0)
627C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 702)

Prerequisites: RWA I and II, see scholarship policy

Board members and candidates participate in and supervise intramural and inter-school competitions. Board membership is by invitation and carries one credit hour per semester. Students who have completed 29 credit hours are eligible to become candidates for the board. Candidates receive one semester hour of credit for participation in Moot Court Competition. Two semesters of credit as a candidate must be completed to qualify for invitation to the board.

Prerequisite(s):

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Moot Court Competition (Class) (2)
627A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 700)
An intramural Moot Court Competition open to all students after their first year. Students who wish to continue in the Moot Court Program must elect Moot Court Competition (Class) during their third semester. The class is a prerequisite for inter-school competition and staff positions.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Moot Court Competition Seminar (2)
627K
Concentration(s):
The intent of this Seminar is to prepare students for participation in an appellate advocacy competition and to provide an avenue for admission to the Moot Court Board for students who are unable to take the fall Moot Court Competition class. It is open to 2L transfer students who were unable to take the fall semester Advocacy course and who are interested in applying for a position on the Moot Court Board (it can be taken concurrently with Advocacy).
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis or RWA: IP Perspective or RWA: Criminal Law Perspective

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Mortgage Banking Law (2)
517A
Concentration(s):
This course will explore in depth the various legal issues in the mortgage banking industry, a trillion dollar industry at the heart of the U.S. economy. The focus will be primarily on the residential mortgage segment, as that is the larger and more familiar part of the industry. (Formerly DCL 466)
The course will examine the "life" of a residential mortgage loan, including its origination between a consumer and a mortgage lender, on the one hand, and its metamorphosis into part of the international capital market, on the other. More particularly, the course will involve analysis of the uniform note and mortgage; examination of non-conventional types of residential finance; survey of applicable federal laws and regulations (including Truth-in-Lending, Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, Equal Credit Opportunity Act, etc.); review of agreements used in the origination and sale of residential mortgage loans; and consideration of the mechanics of securitization of mortgage loans. This will be an interdisciplinary course where students will be able to use concepts of real estate law, consumer law, commercial transactions and securities law.

Prerequisite(s):

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Mortgages (2)
593C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 406)
This course considers various aspects of the law of suretyship and real property security, including land mortgages, land contracts, right to rents and profits before and after foreclosure sale, redemption, subordination agreements, circuity problems under contradictory systems of priorities pursuant to state and federal law, and security interests in fixtures under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and the land law. This course may be offered for 2 or 3 credits.

Prerequisite(s): Property

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National Security Law (3)
545A
Concentration(s):
This course offers a broad overview of national security law. The first few weeks focus on the constitutional framework, especially the separation of national security powers. A brief discussion on the use of force follows, including issues of authorization and preemption. The remainder of the course will focus on terrorism. Several sessions will examine the statutory and constitutional basis for detecting and preventing terrorism at home, and the challenges that have followed. The class will then consider the detention, interrogation, and trying of terrorist suspects. And the semester concludes with attention to legal issues that arise in planning for and responding to a terrorist attack.
Prerequisite(s):

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Natural Resources Law (2)
566C
Concentration(s):Env. & Nat. Resource Law
(Formerly DCL 463)
This course will explore the legal regimes under which public natural resources are allocated and managed. In addition, this course will consider the laws governing federal public lands, which constitute one-third of the nation. Special attention will be given to the costs and benefits of resources development and conservation, and to the philosophical, historical and constitutional underpinnings of natural resources law and policy. Resources studied will include forests, minerals, oil and gas, rangeland, recreation, water, wilderness and wildlife.

Prerequisite(s):

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Negotiation (2)
591C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 520)
This course introduces principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in multiple mock negotiations, with frequent feedback from the instructor.
Prerequisite(s):

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Negotiation Advocacy (2)
591F
Concentration(s):
Students for this course will be selected from the MSU Law Intra-school Negotiation Competition to form two teams to compete in the ABA Law Student Division Negotiation Competition. Selection is based on skill, potential to be excellent teammates, to work hard, and to represent Michigan State University College of Law. The course allows students to develop their negotiation advocacy skills in an intensive, skills-based format. Preparing for the ABA Regional Negotiation Competition, students will develop skills in the areas of problem analysis, negotiation preparation, communications skills and strategies, and reflection and improvement. Through competition, students experience what it is to be a professional, competent, and ethical advocate in a negotiation. Students advancing to the national ABA negotiation competition will be expected to compete and prepare accordingly.
Prerequisite(s):

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Negotiation for Foreign Educated Lawyers (3)
805A
Concentration(s):
This course will provide an overview of fundamental concepts in negotiation theory and provide an opportunity to apply the theory in role plays and simulation exercises.
Prerequisite(s):

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Niagara International Law Competition (2)
627F
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
An international Moot Court competition based upon a Canadian-U.S. legal conflict. The competition is held annually in the spring semester. Participation is by invitation only on the basis of performance in the Transnational Legal Research course.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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NNALSA Moot Court Competition (2)
627J
Concentration(s):
The National Native American Law Students Association (NNALSA) Moot Court Competition is a national competition which focuses its appellate moot court problem on an area of federal Indian law. This class will prepare students for the competition. Students selected to compete will be required to complete an appellate brief and meet for oral argument practice and discussion of the problem.
Prerequisite(s): RWA

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No-Fault Insurance Law (2)
595
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 319)
This course will provide an in-depth look at Michigan's version of the no-fault concept. Statutory and case precedent dealing with such issues as coverage, first-party benefits and limits on recovery will be explored. Also, the policy behind and practical application of the no-fault "threshold" will be studied.

Prerequisite(s):

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Online Dispute Resolution (2)
505J
Concentration(s):
This course introduces students to the evolving field of online dispute resolution (ODR). Students will examine how technology can facilitate dispute resolution. Specific topics will include:
-The history and evolution of ODR
-The nature of online practices, interactions, and disputes
-Implications for dispute resolution across cultural and political boundaries
-ODR systems and applications
-The future of information technology in conflict avoidance and conflict management in online contexts.
-Analysis of online communications as compared to communications that are F2F (face to face)
-Throughout the course students will consider ethical and other professional and practical implications of ODR for parties, counsel, neutrals, and other participants.
There are no particular prerequisites for this course, and no prior knowledge or experience in technology or alternative dispute resolution (ADR) is assumed. Note that the course is not intended to serve as a substitute for a foundational ADR course. This is a hands-on, experiential, skills building course. Students will analyze various online dispute resolution platforms and resolve simulated disputes using such technologies.
Online content will be in the form of readings, audio lectures, powerpoints, threaded discussions, and participation in simulations or other ODR exercises.

Prerequisite(s):

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Partnership Taxation (2)
519
Concentration(s):Tax
(Formerly DCL 316)
Through the use of the problem-solving method, this course will focus on the tax issues associated with the formation, operation, termination and liquidation of partnerships, as well as the sale of partnership interests, related party transactions and classification problems.
EITHER Basic Income Tax A OR Basic Income Tax B, along with EITHER Business Enterprises OR Agency and Partnership, fulfills the prerequesite. Recommended but not required: Business Income Taxation or Corporate Income Taxation



Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation A, Basic Income Taxation B

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Patent Application Preparation (2)
533J
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 556)
This course provides a structure and methodology for preparing a universal patent application suitable for filing in patent offices throughout the world. The course provides: 1) application drafting tools for implementing the requirements of Sections 102, 103 and 112 of Title 35, USC; 2) procedures in drafting the application to avoid issues raised in many litigated patents; 3) steps to be taken before actually drafting the application including inventor interview and searching; and 4) actual drafting of a patent application. An engineering or equivalent degree is recommended, i.e., the technical background required to take the patent agents examination to practice before the US Patent Office. PREREQUISITES OR TAKEN CONCURRENTLY: Intellectual Property Law OR Patent Law OR approval of faculty program chair.
Prerequisite(s): Intellectual Property Law, Patent Law

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Patent Law (3)
533K
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 564)
This course provides a general introduction to patent law, introducing students to the basic legal rules and policies that constitute this important field of intellectual property law. Subjects covered include claim interpretation and patentable subject matter. Students will then spend the majority of the course studying the specific requirements for a valid patent, including the utility, written description, enablement, novelty, and non-obviousness requirements. Patent litigation topics such as infringement, defenses and damages will be covered as time permits. The course will focus on the new America Invents Act (AIA) but will also incorporate older rules as many currently existing patents will be analyzed under pre-AIA standards for the foreseeable future. Although patent cases often involve complicated scientific discoveries or technologies, the essential legal principles or policies rarely depend on understanding the underlying science or technology. Accordingly, students with non-technical backgrounds are encouraged to take this course, particularly given that intellectual property assets, such as patents, are increasingly important to commercial clients the world over.
Prerequisite(s):

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Patent Litigation (2)
533R
Concentration(s):
This course shall consider strategies and procedures pertaining to patent litigation in the U.S. federal courts. Details of the Patent Act and case law shall be analyzed with regard to discovery, motion practice, trial practice, infringement, invalidity and remedies. No technical degree is required. It is recommended students complete Civil Procedure I and II and Patent Law before enrolling in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Payment Systems (3)
501G
Concentration(s):
This course examines negotiable instruments under Article 3, bank deposits and collections pursuant to Article 4, funds transfers under Article 4A, and letters of credit under Article 5 of the UCC. The course also will cover various federal regulations, including those providing rules on check clearing, electronic fund transfers, and improper credit card use. Students who have taken commercial Transactions (LAW 501C) may be ineligible to take this course, so approval from the professor must be obtained to enroll.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II

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Perspectives on Law for King Scholars (1)
626A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 602)
This course is a one credit course open only to first year King Scholars. It will be taught in the second semester, when first year students have one less credit than the first, and is an attempt to add first year content of the King Scholars Program. The course will consist of one hour per week sessions in a book discussion format. The books assigned will provide perspectives on the law not regularly provided in the curriculum. For example, for Spring 2005 the book of Carl Bogus's "Why Lawsuits are Good for America" will be used. Books will change from year to year.
Prerequisite(s):

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Plea and Sentencing Clinic I (4)
630P
Concentration(s):
Plea and Sentencing Clinic I provides a framework in which students will assist with representation of indigent prisoner clients who currently have cases in which they are represented by the State Appellate Defender's Office ("SADO"), and who have issues relating to their sentencing or guilty pleas. Under the supervision of an attorney from SADO, students will interview and counsel with clients, isolate client issues, undertake intensive research relating to the identified issues, prepare legal memoranda, as well as motions and briefs for presentation in Michigan circuit courts, and argue those matters before the circuit court. Students will receive instruction on a variety of matters pertinent to their work, including the structure and overview of the legal system relating to pleas and sentences, plea and sentencing guidelines, client interview techniques, issue spotting and brief writing, and appellate strategy. In participating in this clinic, students will explore and develop fundamental skills and values essential to the ethical and competent practice of law. In addition to class time, enrolled students must work a minimum of 16 hours at the clinic or at SADO's downtown Lansing location each week (in general, each student likely can expect to expend 16 to 20 hours weekly in addition to class time). Some travel time to clients' locations or to circuit courts may be required, depending upon the cases assigned to the student. Students are selected to participate through an application process. NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Criminal Law, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Plea and Sentencing Clinic II (4)
630Q
Concentration(s):
Enrollment in this course is by invitation only. This Clinic provides an opportunity to continue client representation conducted in Plea and Sentencing Clinic I. It also provides for assignments of more complex cases, and an opportunity to assist with mentoring of Clinic I students. This course is by invitation only. In addition to identified class times, students enrolled in Plea and Sentencing Clinic II must work a minimum of 16 hours at the clinic or at the State Appellate Defender Offices downtown Lansing location each week (in general, each student can expect to expend 16 to 20 hours of time weekly in addition to any class times). Some travel time to clients' locations or to circuit courts may be required, depending upon the cases assigned to the student. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Plea and Sentencing Clinic I

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Political Systems and Human Rights in Central and Eastern Europe (1)

Concentration(s):
This course will focus on the political systems and human rights in selected countries of Central and Eastern Europe having political systems far from democracy. Students will be introduced to the specifics of the political systems of chosen states. Selected comparative issues concerning human rights and their protection will also be introduced.
Prerequisite(s):

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Practice and Procedure Before the IRS (2)
572A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 464)
This class will present a comprehensive analysis of practice and procedure before the Internal Revenue Service. Specific topics of instruction will focus on the organization of the IRS and administrative and judicial practice before the IRS. The conduct and defense of audits will be studied, as well as the administration of the collection function and strategies on behalf of taxpayers. A practical exercise in the form of a protest will be completed as an introduction into the study and strategies before the IRS Appeals Division. A brief overview of the criminal investigation function of the IRS will be undertaken. Litigation before the U.S. Tax Court and other available forms will be studied in detail. In addition to the analysis of the applicable rules of practice and procedure, a review and analysis of key Tax Court pleadings such as the petition, stipulation of facts, brief and decision documents will be reviewed. The goal of the course is to prepare students to properly spot issues and advise clients with respect to all matters dealing with the IRS and administration of the U.S. Tax Code. In addition to the final exam, students will take a pro-active approach to the studies in this class by preparing a protest for an administrative appeal in a hypothetical tax situation and drafting an appropriate strategy to a hypothetical case study.

Prerequisite(s):

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Problem-solving Approaches to Conflict Resolution (2)
505C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 553)
(Formerly ADR Survey)
This interactive course will cover the following topics: critical perspectives of ADR, negotiations (strategies, positioning for influence, and truthfulness), mediation (structuring enforceable agreements to mediate, confidentiality, mediator liability, and professional responsibility issues in mediation), third party evaluation and fact-finding, settlement perspectives, including the use of class actions, arbitration (preemption, enforceability of agreements to arbitrate, defenses to arbitration, due process, remedies and judicial review, judicial immunity), and alternative dispute resolution in state and federal courts. Teaching modalities will include lecture, simulations, video and exercises, along with selected book readings.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I

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Problem-solving in Contracts (1)
600E
Concentration(s):
Using a problem format, the course will review major contract topics including: contract formation, consideration, defenses, third party beneficiaries, assignment & delegation, parol evidence, breach and remedies. The course is recommended to students who want to improve their mastery of material covered in the first-year Contracts course. Only graduating third year students are eligible to enroll in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Problem-solving in Property (1)
600D
Concentration(s):
Using a problem format, the course will review major property topics including: estates, easements, covenants, adverse possession, conveyances, recording statutes, and mortgages. The course is recommended to students who want to improve their mastery of material covered in the first-year Property course. Only graduating third year students are eligible to enroll in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Products Liability (2)
522
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 514)
This course will focus on the fundamentals of product liability law practical skills. It examines cutting edge issues that product liability trial lawyers deal with every day in litigation including automotive, pharmaceutical, medical device, consumer products, and toxic tort cases, with an emphasis on automotive design defect litigation that forms a major part of the law. Real-life, current major cases in litigation will be used so that students will be exposed to how product liability litigation is managed. Students will analyze federal legislation and recent case law, including U.S. Supreme Court decisions, learn about regulatory agencies such as NHTSA, FDA and the CPSC, and consider how regulatory agency rules and regulations have a substantial impact on product development and litigation. Students will develop expertise in important topics including expert witness testimony; complex demonstrative exhibits like accident reconstruction, biomechanics, and crash testing; federal preemption; and punitive damages. The course will also cover what companies must do to promote product safety and avoid potential civil and criminal liability. This course provides the perspective of a professor experienced in international product liability law who managed high-exposure litigation and advised clients about liability prevention during product development. The course will equip students with the skills needed to prosecute or defend product liability litigation and also to counsel manufactures to avoid help litigation. The class uses an interactive discussion and is highlighted by distinguished guest speakers and the use of high-technology classroom capabilities, including video-conferences with actual expert witnesses.
Prerequisite(s):

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Professional Responsibility (3)
500Q
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 260)
A course designed to acquaint the law student with many of the obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives. In addition to a discussion of ethical problems involved in the practice of law, an overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students who have already taken Lawyer Regulation and Ethics in a Technology-Driven World may not take this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Property (4)
500G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 113)
This is a survey course of the fundamentals of property law. Possessory interests of real and personal property including findings, bailments and adverse possession are discussed and analyzed. Topics also include future interests, concurrent ownership, lease holds, transfers of land and land use controls.
Prerequisite(s):

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Public International Law (3)
548N
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 341)
This course involves the study of the international legal system, sources and organizations. It also examines the relationship of individuals and states in international law and transnational legal and economic problems.

Prerequisite(s):

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Quantitative Analysis for Lawyers (3)
637E
Concentration(s):
This is an applied course designed to introduce student to various modes of quantitative thinking. The goals of this course are (1) to prepare students to be knowledgeable consumers of quantitative information as practicing lawyers and (2) to prepare students for technology infused law practice of the 21st Century. Course modules include (a) research design, (b) statistics in the courtroom, (c) introduction to probability and basic statistics, (d) data distributions, (e) statistical tests (f) regression analysis, (g) quantitative legal prediction and (h) a brief introduction to legal automation and the technology infused law practice of the present (and not so distant future).

Prerequisite(s): After taking this course, students may not take Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Statistics (509B), nor may they be taken concurrently.

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Reading Comprehension Skills for Foreign Lawyers (0)
804D
Concentration(s):
This course will help prepare foreign LLM students for full time academic work in the areas of English reading, speaking, and writing, with primary focus given to reading strategies and comprehension. Students will work to build arguments, synthesize ideas, and develop persuasive essays skills. Students will respond to literature and synthesize written works to support their writing. Students will learn editing and revision techniques with the goal of making them more independent writers, will work to improve their understanding and use of English grammar, and will learn to recognize and correct their own writing errors. Students will use reading and writing to explore ideas, to challenge opinions, and to think critically.
Prerequisite(s):

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Regulating Environmental Risk (2)

Concentration(s):
This course examines regulatory responses to environmental and other risks to human life and health. It aims to familiarize students with the particular challenges regulators face in responding to such risks, and the spectrum of regulatory choices available to them. Topics to be covered include: Judicial v. administrative regulation of risk, risk assessment and risk management, direct and indirect regulation, cost-benefit analysis, the precautionary principle, and environmental justice. The course will analyze the range of policy, political, and legal-cultural factors behind current American approaches to the regulation of environmental risk.
Prerequisite(s):

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Regulation of Agricultural Production & Marketing (3)
810M
Concentration(s):
This course highlights laws and regulations relevant to agricultural production and distribution of food. Focus is on understanding how laws and regulation influence what farmers raise, how they raise it and market it, and how that affects food quality and value. Topics include current and past methods of supporting production and profitability, agricultural production standards relevant to food products, including organics, and regulation of relationships between produces and buyers.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Regulatory State (2)
530G
Concentration(s):
This course introduces students to the legal rules and principles governing the modern regulatory state, including statutory interpretation, justifications for regulation, how agencies implement their statutory mandates, and how courts review agency regulation and action. The course provides a foundation for upper-level courses in Legislation, Administrative Law, and a host of public law courses. Some sections of Regulatory State and Constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
Prerequisite(s):

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Remedies (2)
593D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 423)
This course provides an overview of the main types of remedies available in the American legal system following a determination of liability for violation of contract, tort, property, or constitutional law. The course will cover monetary damages, equitable relief, and examine the implications of choosing particular remedies, when such choice is available.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I

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Research, Writing & Advocacy: International LL.M. (3)
804
Concentration(s):
Designed to teach international LL.M. foreign lawyers fundamental skills necessary for legal reasoning, research, and written communication in the United States common law system. The course consists of two components: Research and Writing Seminar.

The research component of is designed to introduce students to basic legal research concepts and sources. Sources covered will include: secondary sources, statutory law, case law, and administrative law. At the end of the course students will be able to perform basic research functions, in both print and electronic format, including how to determine that a source is complete and current and how to effectively use free electronic resources as an alternative to print and fee based electronic resources.

The Writing Seminar component of the course begins with the Writing Skills Inventory, and ends with the Writing Proficiency Test. The topics covered on the Writing Proficiency Test are covered in the Writing Seminars taught by the Writing Specialist. The Writing Skills Inventory will help students identify the areas they must work on to pass the Proficiency Test. Unlike the Writing Skills Inventory, the Proficiency Test will use examples and language taken from legal writing. Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.

Prerequisite(s):

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Research, Writing & Analysis (2)
530D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW500J)
Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Prerequisite(s):

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Research, Writing & Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective (2)
530E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW500V)
Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter, with a focus on trademark, copyright and patent law
Prerequisite(s):

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Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspectives (2)

Concentration(s):
This course covers the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, but the written projects focus around social justice issues. The topics of assignments may include, but are not limited to, any of the following areas of law: human rights issues, equal access to education and health care, child welfare, human trafficking, immigration, or issues surrounding the Native American community. The problems will give students an opportunity to reflect on what social justice means, and how we can utilize the justice system to achieve equity for marginalized populations. This course is for students who have an interest in social justice issues or who will likely seek positions with public interest organizations.
Prerequisite(s):

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Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective (2)
530N
Concentration(s):
This course covers all the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, however, all of the written projects, including a closed memorandum, a client letter, and a research memorandum, are placed in the setting of criminal litigation. This course is for students who have an interest in criminal law and/or wish to produce writing samples for a position with a prosecutor or public defender's office, with a private firm that handles criminal litigation, with a state or federal appellate court, or with a trial court that handles a criminal docket.
Prerequisite(s):

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Rule of Law and Jurisprudence (1)
579W
Concentration(s):
This course discusses Rule of Law concepts and surveys various views of law and the legal process. It also examines the judicial decision-making process and the social, political and moral contexts that influence and are influenced by judicial decisions.
Prerequisite(s):

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Sales and Leases (3)
501F
Concentration(s):
This course examines the information and terms, as well as remedies for breach, of contracts for sales of goods, under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). The course also examines Article 2A's provisions on leases and provides an overview of the similarities and differences between Article 2 of the UCC and the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods. Other topics that the course may cover include documents of title under Article 7 of the UCC, Magnuson Moss Warranty Act, or the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA). Students who have taken Commercial Transactions (LAW 501C) may be ineligible to take this course, so approval from the professor must be obtained to enroll.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II

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Secured Transactions (2)
501E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 240)
Covers the process of financing the sale of goods, the secured transaction under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, including creation, perfection, priority of security interests in personal property and default procedures.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts II

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Secured Transactions and Practice (3)
501J
Concentration(s):
Students may not elect this course after taking the two credit Secured Transaction course (501E). This course examines the intricacies of a secured transaction under Revised Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The basic course content is the same as that covered in Secured Transactions (501E) including the creation, perfection and priority of security interests in personal property. Additionally, this course will include a drafting exercise and a more in-depth examination of the secured partys practice in the bankruptcy arena. Students will draft a security agreement and complete all necessary companion paperwork based upon the sale of a business. Prerequisites: Contracts II (500E) OR Contracts (530B)
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts II

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Securities Regulation I (3)
524B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 428)
This course examines the registration requirements applicable to public offers of securities under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Michigan Blue Sky Law. Primary emphasis will be placed upon the various types of securities that are subject to registration and the exemptions from registration requirements. In addition, the course will explore, in further depth, the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. Business Enterprises may be taken concurrently.


Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

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Seminar in Race, Law and American Culture: From Slavery to Post Civil Rights (0)

Concentration(s):
This course examines race history in the United States, with primary reference to the culture and the law affecting African-Americans from slavery to post-Civil Rights. The objective of the course is to provide insight of the evolution of legal doctrine relating to race, examining and critically analyzing continuities and discontinuities; and equip students with the ability to debate, as lawyers and public citizens, the contemporary issues in race relations, with reference to the history of all racial and ethnic minorities and the complications of increasing diversity in racial, ethnic, and cultural traditions in the U.S.
Prerequisite(s):

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Small Business and Nonprofit Law Clinic I (4)
630E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 624)
Supervised clinical practice requires students to assume substantial responsibility for representing clients with various business and transactional matters. Clinical Residents will explore and begin to develop the fundamental legal skills and professional values involved in practicing law-particularly those in business and transactional law. They will develop an understanding of business logic and the importance of adding value to a transaction. Depending on case assignments, law students will gain experience interviewing and counseling clients, negotiating with other attorneys and parties, planning, negotiating and documenting transactions and dispute resolutions, conducting factual investigations and legal audits of businesses, and monitoring and advising compliance with federal, state and local statutes, rules and regulations. Pre-requisites: Business Enterprises. Also preferred, but not required: Accounting for Lawyers OR Corporate Finance. Competitive selection process.

In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12-15 hours weekly). NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Accounting for Lawyers, Business Enterprises, Corporate Finance

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Small Business and Nonprofit Law Clinic II (4)
630J
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 624A)

In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12-15 hours weekly). Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s):

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Special Topics in Comp Law: Comparative Constitutional Law (2)
549C
Concentration(s):
This course covers special topics in law that may be taught in conjunction with MSU Law programs, visiting professors or other reasons.
Prerequisite(s):

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Sports Law (2)
609
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 351)
This course explores the legal structure of and problems surrounding amateur and professional sports leagues and associations. Included will be an examination of the role of the collective bargaining process, representation of the professional athlete, individual contracts and arbitration in professional sports, anti-trust law implications and common problem areas, including the particular place of tort and criminal law in professional and amateur sports.

Prerequisite(s):

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State and Local Government Law (2)
579N
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 354)
This course considers the organization of municipal corporations, their powers and the limitations on such powers. Also considered are property interests of governmental units, their liability for torts, and the acts of their officers and employees.

Prerequisite(s):

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State and Local Taxation (2)
572B
Concentration(s):Tax
(Formerly DCL 356)
This course involves the study of the requirements of uniformity and equality and certain other constitutional limitations on state and local taxes, ad valorem property taxes, commerce clause and import and export restrictions on state taxes, business taxes, due process clause restrictions on state taxes, exemptions from taxation and tax procedure. Specific coverage of Michigan income taxes of individuals and corporations and the Michigan inheritance tax is also included.

Prerequisite(s):

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State Constitutional Law (2)
579Z
Concentration(s):
All lawyers take an oath to uphold the United States Constitution and the constitution of their state. While law students take one or more courses to study the former, rarely do they graduate with any exposure to state constitutional law. This fact is odd given our dual system of government with two sets of sovereigns. But it also leaves law students less prepared to represent their clients, especially since protections afforded under state constitutions are often more generous than their federal counterparts. This class will provide an overview of state constitutional law, across the fifty states and with attention to shared features. Specific issues will include: the interrelation of the state and federal constitutions; provisions protecting individual rights; school funding litigation; and the organization of state governments.
Prerequisite(s):

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Strategic International Transactions (3)
512G
Concentration(s):
This course will introduce Law College students to the most frequently encountered types of strategic international business arrangements including acquisitions, joint ventures and foreign direct investment, project finance, and international equity financing transactions.
Prerequisite(s):

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Strategic Management and the Economics of the Legal Services Industry (1)
537K
Concentration(s):
This course will appeal to students considering a strategy based role using an entrepreneurial path in legal practice. This course is directed primarily to students interested in gaining a working knowledge of the business strategy side of legal practice. Topics will include: introduction to competitive strategy, overview of economics of the legal services industry, competition within the existing industry, substitutes and complements, suppliers and potential entrants. Business strategy provides a starting point for soon to be new lawyers to tackle two issues facing the legal industry. First, new lawyers must understand business subjects like competitive strategy in order to navigate the career paths of tomorrow or to pursue entrepreneurial endeavors. Second, an introduction to business strategy provides new lawyers with the ability to better understand the point of view of their clients and the context required to become a trusted advisor.
Prerequisite(s):

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Street Law - Teaching Law to High School Students (3)
630K
Concentration(s):
The class is a three-credit course and includes up to 12 law students who teach in pairs in various Lansing high school social studies classes. The substance of the course utilizes discussion of landmark Supreme Court cases in the context of hypothetical fact patterns that relate to the high school students' lives. The topics of the classes can include the American Legal System, Constitutional Law, and Criminal Law. The law student instructors use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings that the student instructors practice in a weekly seminar at the law school. The course has two components: a 100-minute weekly seminar, and a field component in which the law students teach in one-hour increments. Law students are responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once the plans are approved by both the Law School faculty member and the high school teacher. Students' grades are based in part on their performance during the training and seminar portions of the course and in part on their performance in the high school classrooms that are monitored by the law school faculty member.

Enrollment in this course is by permission only. The credit/no credit option cannot be elected.
Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, Constitutional Law II, Criminal Law

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Survey of Intellectual Property in Agriculture (3)
810N
Concentration(s):
This course is a survey of the intellectual property concepts that are important in the Agriculture Industry. Beginning with an introduction to intellectual property generally, the class will focus on utility patents, plant patents, and Plant Variety Act certificates, including international perspectives. Trade secrets and trademarks will also be discussed. Once students are grounded in the applicable intellectual property law, the class will turn its focus to the impact that intellectual property rights have on access to food products and food safety. No scientific or other class pre-requisites are required.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Tax Clinic I (4)
630C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 476)
Students enrolled in Tax Clinic I become “client ready” by representing clients with respect to a broad range of federal, state, and local tax controversies. Students advocate for their clients by working through a variety of administrative determinations, as well as by routinely participating in collection due process and Appeals hearings before the Internal Revenue Service and informal conferences before the Michigan Department of Treasury. In addition, they litigate cases in the United States Tax Court, the Michigan Tax Tribunal, the United States District Courts, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and Michigan appellate courts. Students also counsel ESL taxpayers about their rights and responsibilities under the Internal Revenue Code, and engage in numerous outreaches designed to educate the public about tax issues and requirements. All work takes place under the guidance and close supervision of experienced clinical faculty. Class sessions focus not only on substantive tax issues, but also on professional development, ethical considerations, policy matters, and client and case management. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours – in addition to class time – during the semester, and are expected to participate in a one-day orientation scheduled before the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisite(s): For students admitted before Fall 2011, Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II; for students admitted in Fall 2011 and later, Research, Writing & Analysis and Advocacy.

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Tax Clinic II (4)
630D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 515)
Tax Clinic II is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Tax Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling and representing clients, to take on more complex assignments, and to assist in mentoring Tax Clinic I students. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours during the semester.
Prerequisite(s): Tax Clinic I

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Tax Policy Seminar (2)
572D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCl 517)
This seminar covers a range of tax policy issues arising from Federal Taxation. The specific issues studied will vary but, in general, will focus on progressivity and redistribution. Topics likely to be covered include: the use of the income tax as a fiscal policy tool; the concept of income; imputed income; progressive versus flat tax rates; taxation of families; income versus consumption taxation; tax expenditures, exclusions, and deductions; taxation of business and investment income; capital gains and losses; and transfer or wealth taxes. A paper will be required. The topic will be determined after consultation with the instructor. This seminar is open to students who have taken or are enrolled in Basic Income Taxation (A or B). Others who are interested may enroll with the permission of the instructor.
Prerequisite(s):

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Technology Enhanced Trial Advocacy (0)
623G
Concentration(s):Trail Practice Institute
In lieu of tuition, a fee that is not covered by an MSU Law scholarship is assessed for this course. Contact the Trial Practice Institute office at 517-432-6969 to obtain the fee amount. This lab provides hands on training in the efficient uses of courtroom technology and the presentation of electronic evidence. The primary objective of the lab is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to efficiently use electronic evidence in pre-trial and trial litigation. Students enrolled in the Trail Practice Institute are given priority enrollment.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Comparative Constitutional Law: Free Expression (2)
549D
Concentration(s):
This course may be taught in either a lecture or seminar format. When taught as a lecture course it is case based. A number of topics in free expression are examined to see how they are differently treated in various democratic states. When taught as a seminar, there will be readings that will be discussed as a class in the first half of the course. Students will also research a topic involving free expression and its treatment in selected countries. In the second half of the course, papers the students develop will be presented to the class.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Constitutional Law I, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Topics in Comparative Copyright (1)
535J
Concentration(s):
This course will expose students, from a comparative perspective, different national treatments of copyright law. Beginning with an examination of various justifications for copyright protection, the court sees how countries share and differ over the purposes and function of copyright law within their jurisdictions. Specific areas of difference to be examined in depth include Resale Rights, Moral Rights, and Database Protection.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Comparative Law: European Union and Eastern European Trade and Business (1)
549E
Concentration(s):
The course will focus on the internal market of the European Union and the Eastern European countries’ adjustments to the new rules. Selected comparative issues will be presented based on the practices of different states as well as solutions used in the world trade mechanisms and in the US. Students will be introduced to the specifics of the internal market of the European Union including its trade and customs policies. Five major freedoms of the internal market will be discussed based on cases and real-life problems: free movement of workers (including citizenship of the EU), free movement of goods, free movement of services, free movement of payment and investments, as well as the freedom of establishment.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law (3)
550A
Concentration(s):
Students who have taken Conflict of Laws (Law 550) may not take this course. Students who take this course may not take Conflict of Laws. The theory of the course is to provide students a learning environment that is mid-way between law school and the real world of law practice. Thus, instead of the usual law school discussion class led by the professor, roughly half the classes are hands-on litigation exercises run by the class members. Instead of the usual final exam, students are doing memos and a longer writing assignment closer to the actual writing lawyers do on the job. Students may find assignments longer than they are used to in other courses. This course includes two components. The first component is an intensive exploration of the doctrine and policy considerations relevant to choice-of-law determinations. The second component is comprised of simulated appellate litigation – in short, moot court exercises conducted by the students in class. The purpose of the doctrine/policy half of the course is to prepare students for the moot court problems (and ultimately, for the practice of law). The simulated litigation portion of the course will be composed of moot court exercises in which students will be required to participate in oral argument and/or judicial decision making, to do primary legal research to write an opinion in a problem of the student’s choice and a series of bench memoranda in which students propose results for some of the problems that students would recommend to a judge deciding those cases.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I (LAW 530A)

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Topics in Constitutional Law (0)
579U
Concentration(s):
Special topics in constitutional law that may be taught in conjunction with MSU law program
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Constitutional Law: Fourteenth Amendment Equality Seminar (2)
579U
Concentration(s):
This seminar focuses on the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Students will review Supreme Court cases, study legal scholarship, and critique social science literature exploring the implications of equality law. We will discuss definitions of equality, approaches to reaching equality goals, doctrinal shifts, and proposed policy revisions. Students should gain a framework for critically analyzing the equality arguments asserted on behalf of groups in varying social contexts, e.g., gender in employment settings, wealth discrimination, and race in education. It is recommended, but not required, that students take Constitutional Law II prior to enrolling in this course.


Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Constitutional Law: Judicial Biographies (2)
579U
Concentration(s):
This course will be an examination of the form, sources, and purpose of judicial biographies and other primary materials about judges, with particular reference to the U.S. Supreme Court. Students will study inside stories of the Supreme Court or other courts, archival materials from judges’ papers, and historical interpretations of the dynamics among judges within court and by judges with political actors.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Constitutional Law: U.S. Foreign Relations Law (2)
579U
Concentration(s):
The course is designed to introduce students to the law of foreign relations in the United States. In general terms, it examines the impact of the constitutional distribution of powers on the conduct of U.S. foreign relations law. In particular, it addresses the influence of separation of powers doctrines on the conduct of foreign relations, the status of international law in the U.S. legal system, the role of the courts in adjudicating issues affecting foreign relations, and the controversy over distribution of war powers between the President and Congress.

Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Constitutional Law: Comparative Citizenship (1)
579U
Concentration(s):
After providing an overview of the ways in which individuals become citizens in a formal sense, this course will explore what citizenship means in a substantive sense and how those meanings have been created and changed through constitutional provisions, legislation, and judicial interpretation in various democracies.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Criminal Law: The Criminal Jury Today (2)
618
Concentration(s):
The jury plays a central part in U.S. civil and criminal law. How it functions affects the system both directly in individual jury trials and indirectly by influencing incentives to settle cases out of court. This seminar will examine the functions and performance of the contemporary civil and criminal jury system. The course emphasizes empirical research assessing jury selection and how the jury carries out its legally defined role. The course examines its contemporary and historical legal position. By studying juries function and behave, students will gain insight into both how to communicate with jurors and how to approach policy issues that arise with respect to the proper role of the jury. This is a reading-intensive seminar in which student participation in discussion forms a central component in the evaluation of students.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Cyberlaw from an International Perspective (1)
535K
Concentration(s):
This course will cover international aspects of cyber law, including problems in international jurisdiction, the Conventional on Cybercrime, the role of ICAAN in internet regulation, and the WIPO Internet Domain Name resolution process. In addition, we will cover several issues in international e-commerce, such as international recognition of valid e-signatures. Students will examine how the unique features of the internet affect both international and national regulatory regimes.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in European Private Law and Intellectual Property Law (2)
535M
Concentration(s):
This course is intended to provide students with the basic knowledge and general understanding of fundamental concepts in European private law and particularly in European intellectual property law. Where appropriate the course includes comparisons to the US law. In addition, the course aims at identifying specific issues in the field of IP which emerged in the course of Croatian preparation for the accession to the European Union.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Family Law (2)
541R
Concentration(s):
This course covers special topics in law that may be taught in conjunction with MSU law programs, visiting professors or for other reasons.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Family Law: Comparative Family Law (2)
541R
Concentration(s):
This course examines family structures and the changing nature of “family” in the U.S. and throughout the world, with a particular emphasis on a comparison of U.S. and Shari’a law. Having considered the various types of legally recognized family relationships – such as spousal relationships and parent-child relationships – we will further examine the rights and responsibilities of parties within those relationships. Finally, we will consider the dissolution of family relationships and corresponding issues such as division of property, spousal support, child support, and child custody.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Intellectual Property (0)

Concentration(s):
This course covers special topics in law that may be taught in conjunction with MSU law programs, visiting professors or for other reasons.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in International IP (1)
535G
Concentration(s):
This course will examine how international legal regimes affect international property rights on a global basis. The course will cover the major IP regimes: copyright, patent, and trademark. The course will pay special attention to the TRIPS Agreement, how it affects national IP regulation and how it works as an international treaty mechanism. Other topics will include exhaustion of trademarks, different national approaches to the protection of data, and geographical indicators.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in International Law (0)
548Z
Concentration(s):
Special topics in international law that may be taught in conjunction with MSU law program
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics In Professional Responsibility (2)
500U
Concentration(s):
This course covers special topics in law that may be taught in conjunction with MSU law programs, visiting professors or for other reasons.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Professional Responsibility: Comparative Professional Codes of Conduct (2)
500U
Concentration(s):
This course is a problem-based comparative examination of legal ethics and the rules governing professional conduct of lawyers practicing in the DIFC (Dubai International Financial Centre) compared to those practicing in the United States. Specifically, the course will focus analysis on the rules governing conflicts of interest and confidentiality and their underlying conceptual differences.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Professional Responsibility: Comparative Professional Codes of Conduct (2)
500U
Concentration(s):
This course is a problem-based comparative examination of legal ethics and the rules governing professional conduct of lawyers practicing in the DIFC (Dubai International Financial Centre) compared to those practicing in the United States. Specifically, the course will focus analysis on the rules governing conflicts of interest and confidentiality and their underlying conceptual differences.
Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Professional Responsibility: The First Amendment and Regulation of Lawyers' Speech (2)
500U
Concentration(s):
The First Amendment protection afforded to the speech of lawyers is a critically important aspect of professional responsibility and legal ethics. This seminar provides an opportunity for students to conduct an intensive study of Supreme Court cases, lower court decisions, legal scholarship, and other materials addressing the regulation of attorney speech. The topics to be explored in this seminar include attorney licensing requirements, regulation of professional advice, advertising/solicitation restrictions, legal blogs/websites, criticism of the judiciary, civility rules, courtroom decorum, pre-trial publicity/statements to the media, mandatory reporting/whistle-blowing, confidentiality duties, and judicial speech. It is recommended, but not required, that students take Constitutional Law II prior to enrolling in this seminar.

Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Property Law: Eminent Domain Seminar (2)
533W
Concentration(s):
This seminar focuses on eminent domain and condemnation issues.

Prerequisite(s):

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Topics in Tort Law (0)
525B
Concentration(s):
Special topics in tort law that may be taught in conjunction with MSU law program.
Prerequisite(s):

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Torts I (4)
500R
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCl 141)
The study of the protection that the law affords against interference by others with one's person, property or intangible interest. It is broadly divisible into three areas of liability: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. Specific tort actions and defenses are analyzed. Each is examined in the context of underlying social and economic factors that provide the framework in which law develops and social conflict is managed.
Prerequisite(s):

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Trade Secrets (2)
535N
Concentration(s):
Trade secret law is the black sheep of United States IP laws because it originates in state common law, not federal statutory law. Highly influenced by the uniform statute and restatement movements, trade secret law has become somewhat consistent across the fifty states, becoming a coherent and important body of law. Trade secrets are arguably the most widespread of IP protections and can cover subject matter that patent and copyright cannot such as formulas, recipes, and customer lists. This course is intended to provide students with a thorough background in the central principles of trade secret law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law (2)
533N
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 461)
This course addresses current issues and developments such as the constitutional foundations and limitations of trademark protection, domain names and cybersquatting.
Prerequisite(s):

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Transnational Legal Research (2)
548Q
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 445)
This course is designed to develop the student's skills in legal research, writing and advocacy concerning legal problems transcending national borders. Class work is split into lecture and library sessions concentrating on legal bibliography and the legal process of transnational problems. The course also will include an intensive writing and advocacy exercise. Performance in the course will provide the basis for invitation to membership on the Jessup Team or the Niagara Team.

Prerequisite(s):

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Trial Practice Institute - Trial I (3)
623D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 534)
Must be in the Trial Practice Institutue program.
Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Prerequisite(s):

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Trial Practice Institute-Pretrial II (2)
623C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 513)
Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Pretrial II focuses on the fundamental approaches of persuasion, elements of advocacy and methods of effective presentation. The class is divided into four teams of four people which are then assigned depositions of witnesses in a problem with fact, lay and expert witnesses. At the conclusion of the deposition phase of the problem, motions in limine are prepared and argued by each team. Additionally, a facilitative mediation brief is prepared by all teams and argued. At the conclusion of the class, opening statements are prepared and presented by each one of the teams. The students will be prepared at the end of the course for the elements of the Trial I course that will commence in the second year of the program. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program.
Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Prerequisite(s):

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Trial Practice Institute-Trial II (3)
623E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 542 and DCL 565, Formerly Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIA and Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIB )
Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. This course caps the trial training program at Michigan State University-DCL College of Law. The purpose of the course is to provide graduating seniors with the opportunity to use the skills and education they have received to handle a complete criminal case, from their initial interview with the client (or making the charging decision based upon a law enforcement investigation and request for warrant). This program is unique in that the defendant, law enforcement witnesses, civilian witnesses, and expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University, Department of Theatre. The expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University Medical School. The objective for all students involved is to have hands on experience related to their particular college and curriculum at Michigan State University. Law students will have an opportunity to take a criminal case from start to finish, investigating the facts of the case, preparing for all aspects of the case through the development of the theory of the case, interviewing witnesses, conducting the preliminary examination, motion practice and culminating with the trial itself. The goal is to provide an opportunity to put into practice what students have learned over their law school career at MSU College of Law. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program.
Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Prerequisite(s):
Prerequisite(s):

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Trial Practice Institute: Pre-Trial I (3)
623B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 506)
Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program.
Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Prerequisite(s):

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Trial Practice Institute: Theatrical Skills - Advocacy as a Performing Art (1)
623A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 533)
A 7 week workshop designed to enhance a students' advocacy skills through application of actor training techniques by increasing student awareness of the ability to communicate effectively with both voice and body. The course consists of one 1 hour 50 minute session per week for 7 weeks in which students will participate in various acting exercises and improvisations emphasizing effective use of body language and physical expressiveness, developing spontaneity in presenting prepared material, exploring the rhetorical hooks and vocal nuances essential to persuasive speaking and strengthening storytelling skills. At the end of the workshop, students will present a public speech by a current or historical speaker as if it was an opening or closing argument to a jury. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program.
Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Prerequisite(s):

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Trial Practice Institute: Trial Practicum (0)
623J
Concentration(s):
This course will provide the foundation for trial work to all TPI students, but is designed for TPI students who do not have advocacy experience through the Moot Court & Trial Advocacy Board (Board). The course includes instruction on the component parts of a trial, such as opening statement, direct examination, cross examination, and closing argument. It also explores introducing exhibits, impeachment, the mechanics of refreshing recollection, and the recorded recollection hearsay exception. It will also provide students with an opportunity to refine these skills on their feet.
Prerequisite(s):

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Trial Practice Institute: Expert and Scientific Evidence (2)
623F
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 543)
This course will present students with a discussion of the nature of forensic science and scientific evidence. Topics include: forensic science, scientific evidence, admissibility of scientific evidence, quality assurance and control. There will also be lectures on certain areas of forensic science that are often the subject of litigation. These include DNA, inferential statistics, traffic accident reconstruction, forensic engineering, forensic pathology, paternity testing and drunk driving. The course meets for 4 hours per week for 7 weeks. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program.
Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Prerequisite(s):

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Urban Food, Farm and Agriculture Law Practicum (3)
566P
Concentration(s):
Students will engage in two overlapping sets of activities. First, they will develop an understanding of the issues confronting urban agriculture and food access in Detroit and conduct a strategic planning process with key MSU and Detroit partners. Second, they will identify some of the most promising community agriculture projects in Detroit, determine the legal impediments facing those groups, and create a focused plan – examining geography, strong community partners, and key legal requirements – to address those issues. Students will be expected to work 14 hours per week outside of the seminar class.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I or Research, Writing and Analysis and Research, Writing and Advocacy II or Advocacy

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US Food Imports: Process, Regulation, and Food Safety (3)
810R
Concentration(s):
An overview of the regulation of US food imports by USFDA, USDA FSIS, USDA APHIS, and US Customs. Students will work on a practical problem that simulates the attorney-client and regulatory agency interaction process in a specific food import regulatory context. Students assume the roles of law-firm associates and will prepare attorney-client documents and communications and petitions to one or more regulatory agencies.
Prerequisite(s): For students in the Global Food Law Program

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Virtual Law Practice (2)
537G
Concentration(s):
This course is directed primarily to students interested in gaining a practical knowledge of virtual law practice, unbundling and alternative forms of technology-driven legal service delivery. Students will study ethics issues and best practices for the use of these delivery models. In addition to a strong focus on unbundled legal services, other alternative or complementary forms of legal service delivery covered will include: the virtual law firm, the branded network concept, online dispute resolution, franchised law firm models, alternative business structures, web advisors, alternative billing methods, pro and “low” bono programs using online delivery, marketing a virtual practice, and collaborative methods of online delivery. The methods of practice management covered in this course will apply to a broad spectrum of students interested in both traditional and technology-enabled law practice. Students will be required to complete a business plan for a law practice that integrates one or more methods of online legal service delivery discussed in the course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Wildlife Law (2)
565B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 376)
A study of how the legal system deals with wildlife issues. While some federal law will be considered, this course's primary focus will be at the state law level. It will review wildlife related laws from a variety of perspectives, including those that recognize sustainable use as a valid conservation tool, and regulated hunting as a component of conservation and sound wildlife management. A paper will be required.

Prerequisite(s):

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Williams Institute Moot Court Competition Class (2)
627G
Concentration(s):
The Williams Institute of UCLA School of Law hosts the only national competition dedicated exclusively to the subject of sexual orientation and gender identity law. In preparing for the Williams Institute Moot Court Competition, students will develop skills in the areas of advanced legal research, legal writing, critical examination of the detailed nuances of a complex legal issue, team work, and strategies for planning an effective oral argument. Students will be selected to represent Michigan State University College of Law based on their interest in the subject area, their written and oral advocacy skills, their potential to be excellent teammates, and ability to work hard. This course allows students to develop specialized knowledge in Constitutional law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Workers' Compensation (2)
610
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 389)
This course involves the study of the principal provisions of the Michigan Workers' Disability Compensation Act and decisions thereunder, notably in respect to compensability, benefits and proceedings before the Compensation Bureau.

Prerequisite(s):

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