MSU College of Law

Course Descriptions

[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
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Gaming Law (2)
635F
(Formerly titled Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Indian Gaming Law) This course will introduce students to the unique legal issues that govern Indian gaming activities. Indian Gaming has been the largest economic development tool available to Indian tribal governments over the past 30 years. Today, the Indian gaming industry generates more than $25 billion per year, nationwide. Students in this class will learn about the federal and tribal regulatory structures that govern tribal gaming, the interplay of federal, state, tribal, and local laws in this regulatory structure, the process by which tribes and states negotiate gaming compacts, and the nuanced classification of tribal gaming activities.

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Global Law Colloquium (0)
545D
This course offers a broad overview of key, contemporary international legal issues which will be presented by JD and LL.M. students. Students will read and comment upon student papers and presentations. Students will be evaluated on their presentations and abstracts of their topic. Students participating in the Colloquium for 3 credits through a Directed Study will be evaluated primarily on their research paper.

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Global Perspectives on Indigenous Peoples (2)

(Formerly titled Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Global Perspectives on Indigenous Peoples) There are nearly 400 million indigenous peoples throughout the world. Historically, many indigenous peoples have experienced displacement, loss of control over resources, forced assimilation, and genocide. Students will study the place of indigenous peoples within the international legal system and the rights of indigenous peoples within the domestic legal systems of several countries. A portion of this course will focus on international law and institutions principally focused on indigenous peoples; challenges of asserting indigenous rights using the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the ILO Conventions 107 and 169, the Draft American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the World Bank\'s Operational Policy 4.10 and related Bank Procedures; and indigenous claims brought before the Inter-American Human Rights System. Students also will study the comparative law of indigenous peoples. The law of several jurisdictions, including the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Norway, and Colombia will be examined to compare their treatment of indigenous rights. The themes of indigenous rights to self-determination and rights to land, resources, and cultural survival will be addressed throughout the course.

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Global Risk Regulation - Food Focus (3)
810Q
As more and more citizens come to reap the benefits of open trade on a global scale, as well as extended lifespan and high quality of life, they also seem to expect public authorities to deliver more protection against those threats, whether industrial or natural. Amid contemporary preoccupations with risks, managing threats to society has become one of the central tasks of governments. Due to their inherent global dimension, risks today call for global governance solutions. This course focuses on societies' efforts to assess and manage food, health, safety and environmental risks, including selection of the risks deserving regulatory attention, scientific advice and decision-making situations of scientific uncertainty, the role of non-scientific values, calculating costs and benefits of regulation, and distributional and equity effects.
Prerequisite(s): Intended for students in the Global Food Law program

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Government Relations and Lobbying Law (2)
551D
This course provides an overview of governmental relations and lobbying law. It will address topics such as compliance with state and federal statutes and regulations that govern the practice and ethics of lobbying. The course will explore distinctions among legislative, administrative and grassroots lobbying and the professional norms of appropriate behavior that apply to lobbyists.

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Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I (4)
630T
The Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic has three components. Students will teach First Amendment workshops to faculty advisors and student journalists at Michigan high schools covering censorship, libel, and privacy issues, as well as copyright and libel matters involving Facebook and Internet postings. Students also will provide pro bono legal representation to high school and community college journalists whose free speech rights have been challenged. In addition, clinic students will conduct a Freedom of Information Act survey of school district regulations that govern First Amendment rights of student journalists. Students will receive targeted instruction on First Amendment press issues on a weekly basis. As workshop instructors, students will use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings. Students will be responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once they are approved by a Law College faculty member and a high school teacher. In addition to class time, students must work a minimum of 12 hours each week in representing pro bono clients and preparing First Amendment workshops. Some travel time to high schools may be required. Students are selected to participate through an application process. NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisites: RWA I and II; (successful completion of Media Law is preferred, but not required)


Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic II (0)
630U
course description forthcoming
Prerequisite(s): Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I

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Halal Food: An Introduction to Islamic Laws and Ethics (3)
545K
Current and expected growth in halal foods has necessitated that scientists, legal practitioners and other professionals, and thought leaders active in global food markets be conversant with Islamic dietary laws and ethics. This course will introduce students to the religious foundations of Islamic dietary laws, ethics and customs relating to food generally, and as they particularly relate to consumption and to commercial food production. We will study certain discreet topics as well, such as alcohol and gelatin, and the interaction of national laws with Islamic ethics, and the process of halal certification. The study of many topics will include consideration of kosher laws and practices.
Prerequisite(s): Intended for students in the Global Food Law Program only

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Health Care Fraud and Abuse (2)
558J
(Formerly DCL 594)
The course will cover federal and state laws that impose criminal and civil penalties on health care providers for a variety of activities, ranging from payment for referrals to the submissions of false claims. The course would cover the federal and state illegal remuneration statutes, the federal civil monetary penalty and exclusion laws, the federal anti-referral (Stark) law, and the federal false claims laws as they apply to the health care industry.

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Health Care Law (2)
558C
(Formerly DCL 458)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
Survey of major aspects of substantive health care law and regulation. Topics include: 1) Health care economics, including the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, health insurance, Medicare and Medicaid; 2) Health facility regulation, including quality assurance programs, licensing and Medicare-imposed operational requirements; 3) Health professional (practitioner) regulation, including board certification, licensure, medical staff credentialing and corporate practice of medicine; 4) Managed care, including organizational structures, regulation, contracting practices and vicarious liability; 5) Regulation of human subject research; 6) Personal autonomy, surrogate decisionmakers and death and dying; 7) Kickback, Fraud and Abuse and Stark II regulation of referral patterns; 8) Corporate structure and federal tax exemption of health care institutions. Medical malpractice and tort liability will not be emphasized. A final examination is required.

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Hospitality Law (2)
605A
Students learn to identify and manage the legal issues raised by clients providing lodging, food, and alcohol to the public, with a focus on entrepreneurship and small business models, and particular attention to the intersection of local, state, and federal regulation. Topics would include choice of business form, duties to guests and others, food and alcohol regulation, lodging and land use regulation. The course will include several case studies requiring students to consider clients’ business plans and provide appropriate legal analysis and advice.
Prerequisite(s): Torts (Law 500R) and Contracts (Law 530B)

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Housing Law and the Public Interest (2)
603B
This is an introductory course that focuses on the significant laws, cases and policies formulated in the 21st century to address housing issues in the United States. The focus is on laws that were a response to economic, racial, and immigration issues and laws and policies designed to provide more access and opportunity to obtain safe, fair, and affordable housing. The course will examine legal and policy areas relating to housing and the problem of providing housing to the population in an effort to bring the issue of a society providing housing for its citizens full circle.

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Housing Law Clinic I (4)
630V
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic I - LAW 630A)

Housing Law Clinic I is a comprehensive housing clinic that will cover a variety of housing areas for students. Students will have the opportunity to master the basics of local landlord-tenant law, and to focus on how the clinic can best serve the community in the housing area based upon the overall needs of the community and the problems facing consumers with respect to their housing choices. Other areas of clinic development and student advocacy will entail, but will not be limited to, foreclosures, fair housing, affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness. Students can be expected to be assigned actual clients with housing problems and will, with supervision, act as legal counsel for these clients in a variety of settings. This will include advocacy in local housing courts and judicial tribunals in the state of Michigan. However, students will be mainly trained to be advocates, in and out of a judicial setting, with the overall goal to provide the student with a more expansive and well-rounded experience regarding housing law in a legal education setting. Students also will have the opportunity to consider other areas of housing advocacy where they might be able to have an impact on the lives of consumers, and will be supervised and supported in pursuing these goals on behalf of consumers.



Enrollment in Housing Law Clinic I is by application only. Details about the application process will be provided to students in advance of each semester's enrollment period. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student works between 12-15 hours weekly in addition to instructional time). NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory orientation session that will likely take place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.


Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II,Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy

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Housing Law Clinic II (4)
630W
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic II - LAW 630B)

Housing Law Clinic II provides an opportunity for students, upon approval of the supervising faculty, to continue work Housing Law Clinic. The selected students will be expected to provide support and work more independently than students enrolled in Housing Law Clinic I. Expectations are high and ongoing projects and cases that these students are engaged in will be a core responsibility.


Prerequisite(s): Housing Law Clinic I, Rental Housing Clinic I

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[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
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