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Course Descriptions

[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
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King Scholars Jurisprudence (2)
626C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 359)
Prerequisite: King Scholar A course in jurisprudence available to King Scholars as part of the King Scholarship Program.

Students entering with a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Jurisprudence class during their third semester at the Law College. Matriculating students receiving a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Jurisprudence class in their next regular semester.

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King Scholars Program (0)
626B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 191) Students who have a King Scholarship will be enrolled for King Scholars each semester by the Office of the Registrar.
Prerequisite(s):
-King Scholars Program

Prerequisite(s): King Scholars Program

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King Scholars Seminar (2)
626D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 404)
Students who have a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Senior Paper course in their last regular semester at the Law College.

Prerequisite(s): King Scholars Jurisprudence

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Labor Law (3)
511D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 382)
This is a basic labor law course exploring the application of the National Labor Relations Act as amended. Subjects include the jurisdiction, organization and procedures of the National Labor Relations Board; the protection of the right of self-organization; company domination of or assistance to the union; discrimination against employees; remedies for unfair labor practices; review of the procedures for selection of representatives for the purposes of collective bargaining; securing bargaining rights through unfair labor practice procedures; and the law concerning negotiation of collective bargaining agreements, including the subjects of collective bargaining, strikes, boycotts and picketing under the common law and the act.

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Land Use Planning (3)
566B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 401)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
Explores the principal methods of local government control of land use, with special emphasis on the theory and practice of zoning and eminent domain. Analyzes judicial response, through the use of nuisance and "takings" doctrines, to local land use planning efforts.
Prerequisite(s): Property

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Law and Economics (3)
515
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 443)
Law and Economics, (alternatively named "the economics of legal relationships" or perhaps more accurately, "the economic analysis of law") is defined as the application of economic theory – primarily microeconomics and the basic concepts of welfare economics – to examine the formation, structure, processes, and the economic impact of law and legal institutions. The purpose of this course is to: (1) provide a brief review of microeconomic theory sufficient to (2) undertake a survey (the history, the people, and their ideas) of the dominant schools of thought that comprise the field of Law and Economics including i) the Chicago approach to law and economics, ii) the New Haven school, iii) public choice theory, iv) social norms and Law and Economics, v) Austrian law and economics, vi) institutional law and economics, and vii) the new institutional economics. Each of these schools of thought places a significant emphasis on the interrelations between law and economy. The goal is to have you understand the jurisprudential niche occupied by these several schools of thought and their impact on present-day legal scholarship... to get a sense of the “lay of the land;” no attempt is made to critique the schools or the ideas contained therein. The materials covered in this class are of fundamental importance not only for those working in the fields of economics and law, but also to those in the contiguous disciplines of political science, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. Prerequisite: an understanding of the principles of microeconomics.
Prerequisite(s): After taking this course, students may not take Analytical Methods for Lawyers - Microeconomics (509A), nor may they be taken concurrently.

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Law and Literature (3)
548T
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 462)
In this course, students read and discuss literature to examine issues that exist at the heart of law, such as the conflict between a legal system and other norms, retribution and revenge, the role of deliberation and emotion in (legal) decisions, the genesis of law in the community, comedy, plural voices, and other literary and legal questions. Grades are based on class participation; short, written student reactions to literature and law assigned; and a choice of either 1) choosing, assigning, and leading a class on a literary work (conceived broadly to include film, music, and other texts) and associated law or 2) writing a final paper. Topics for assignments and papers must be approved by the professor. Past classes have read: Aeschylus, Plato, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Locke, Hobbes, Twain, murder ballads, Coetzee, dark poetry, and other texts.
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Law and Policy of Corrections (0)
579T
Concentration(s):
This course could be offered for 2 or 3 credits.
This is a course on applied or advanced constitutional law in the context of prisoners and pretrial detainees. The first part of the course will provide an introduction to punishment and sentencing. The second part of the course provides a survey of the constitutional law of incarceration, including materials on procedural and substantive due process, equal protection, the ban on cruel and unusual punishment, First Amendment protections, and rights of access to the courts and attorneys. The final section considers the mechanics of prisoners' rights litigation under Section 1983.
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Law and Religion (3)
579K
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 530)
This course will focus on church/state law -- the legal doctrines that have arisen in cases under the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. The course will explore the role of law in various religious traditions and the role of religion in law and public discourse. Topics addressed include school prayer, government aid to religious institutions (including school vouchers and charitable choice), government endorsement of religious symbols, the role of public forum doctrine in religion cases, freedom of religious expression, and the freedom to practice one's religion.
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Law Externship (3)
625A
Concentration(s):
An externship is a voluntary, for-credit opportunity with government agencies, judiciary, and non-profit or public interest agencies. Students are able to complete two 3-credit externships during their law school careers, if desired, after earning 24 law school credits. Externships require a minimum of 12-15 hours per week, for the duration of the semester, a bi-weekly report of legal work performed, a mid-semester seminar, and a final paper. The Career Services Office holds informational meetings each semester about the Externship Program. Additional information regarding externships is found at http://www.law.msu.edu/career/externships.html
Students who have earned six (6) credits in the Canadian Summer Externship Program in Ottawa (course 634) are not eligible to enroll in another externship.

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Law Practice Innovation and Entrepreneurship (0)
537F
Concentration(s):
This course offers training about the evolving world of technology in legal services delivery and provides students with an understanding of these trends and how they might capitalize on them in modern law practice or in the development of their own legal technology. Please note that this course assumes students may (or may not) arrive with a range of experience in the use of technology—we will provide training for everything needed to succeed in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

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Law Practice Management (2)
592
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 309)
This course is designed to provide an overview of the issues involved in managing a law office. These include forms of practice (partnership, professional corporation, sole practitioners), personnel issues, physical requirements, computers, financial management, practice development and ethical issues. Also covered are various law office systems: docket, tickler, trust accounting, timekeeping, etc. It is recommended that students take the Professional Responsibility course before or concurrently with Law Practice Management.

Prerequisite(s): Professional Responsibility

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Law Review (4)
628
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 790)

Prerequisites: RWA I and II, credits completed and GPA

Participation is by invitation or writing competition upon satisfactory completion by full-time students of two full semesters and by part-time students of three full semesters. Four semester hours of ungraded credit earned upon successful completion of a casenote, a comment and all required production work.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Lawyer Ethics and Regulation in a Technology-Driven World (3)
537J
Concentration(s):
This course prepares the law student to address the many obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives in the context of a technology-driven world. This class focuses on the Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ethical problems involved in the practice of law. An overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students will also consider the unique professional conduct concerns and opportunities presented by technology in law practice. This course provides background preparation for taking the Multistate Professional Responsibility Exam. This class satisfies the 3 credit upper level Professional Responsibility requirement. Students who have already taken Professional Responsibility may not take this course.
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Lawyers & Ethics (1)
530C
Concentration(s):
The course is taught in the first-year and supplements the required upper-level required Professional Responsibility course. The course exposes first-year students to the ethical philosophy necessary for making decisions in life, law school, and law practice.
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Legal Analysis, Practice Application and Writing (1)
600B
Concentration(s):
The course format focuses on teaching analysis and writing skills for answering Multistate Essay Exam (MEE) questions and drafting legal documents for the Multistate Performance Test (MPT). Students will work on the skills necessary to organize and present answers to maximize points awarded by the examiners. Students will do simulation questions with answers graded by former bar exam graders. Additionally, random student answers will be critiqued with the class to identify strengths and weaknesses. The course is recommended to students taking the bar exam where both exams are administered (e.g., Illinois, Colorado, District of Columbia Missouri, Utah and Wisconsin). It will also be helpful to students taking the bar exam where the MPT is administered (e.g., New York, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Georgia, Indiana, Maryland, Minnesota, and Nevada). Attendance and participation in all sessions is required to obtain credit for the course. Only graduating third year students are eligible to enroll in this course.
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Legal Analytics (2)
537N
Concentration(s):
This course is designed to train students to efficiently manage, collect, explore and analyze various forms of legal data. Its purpose is to imbue students with the capability to:(1) understand the process of extracting knowledge from data with specific applications to domains such as legal prediction; (2) distinguish themselves in legal proceedings involving data or analysis;(3) distinguish themselves in firm management matters;(4) understand and communicate with information and software sector clients; and(5) use data to manage outside resources such as LPO or eDiscovery providers.Students will be introduced to sophisticated statistical techniques including machine learning and natural language processing.

Prerequisite(s): Quantitative Analysis for Lawyers (637E) or with professor permission alternative prior experience with data/statistics.

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Legal English I for Foreign Lawyers (3)
804A
Concentration(s):
Legal English I is designed to provide practice for foreign lawyers in the fundamental skills of written legal English and common law analysis in the United States. Students in Legal English I will draft a variety of legal documents and participate in a variety of oral exercises and presentations.
Prerequisite(s):

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Legal English II for Foreign Lawyers (3)
804B
Concentration(s):
Enrollment in this course is by invitation only from the legal writing program faculty. Participants are foreign lawyers whose English language skills, even after participation in Common Law Reasoning, remain a significant impediment to their ability to reason from legal texts in English or a significant impediment to assessment of their legal reasoning. Students will draft a variety of legal documents and participate in a variety of oral exercises and presentations. The course has four modules. The writing specialist will teach one class period per module, covering basic English skills, such as sentence structure. Students will write for, or give presentations in, almost every class. Students will attend a minimum of one required conference with the writing specialist and one required conference with the professor.
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Legal Information Engineering & Technology (1)
537A
Concentration(s):
This course highlights the increasing role of legal information technology in the law practice of today (and the not too distant future). Students will be exposed to a number emerging approaches in legal automation, process engineering, informatics / ‘soft’ artificial intelligence (e-discovery, automated document generation), supply chain management, and quantitative legal prediction.
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Legal Services Act and UK Deregulation (1)
537C
Concentration(s):
This course exposes students to the history and impact of the Legal Services Act and deregulation of the profession in the UK with a focus on how the resulting innovations (both regulatory changes and new legal services delivery mechanisms that follow) might be exported to the US. This course will include a roundtable discussion with members of the Legal Services Board and a tour of relevant London legal institutions. Also encompassed in this course will be a comparative overview of American and British law governing lawyers and law practice.

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Legislation (3)
579P
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 329)
This course starts with the premise that understanding the legislative process is important for sophisticated legal analysis in an age of legislation. The course therefore studies different theories of the legislative process, as well as the accompanying doctrines and theories of statutory interpretation. It also examines structures of representative democracy and deliberative decision making, including the principle of "one person, one vote," reapportionment of legislative districts, term limits, the line-item veto, and regulations of campaign finance. Finally, the course considers the use of direct democracy as an alternative to republican government and examines the role of administrative agencies in the implementation and interpretation of statutes. By the end of the semester, students will have a greater understanding of the various public law institutions in the United States, their relationships to one another, and how this knowledge can be used to construct persuasive arguments regarding the application of positive law to particular legal problems.
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Licensing Intellectual Property (2)
533F
Concentration(s):Intellectual Property
(Formerly DCL 516)
The class focuses on managing an intellectual property portfolio to maximize a client's return on investment in intellectual property assets. Unlike other intellectual property courses that focus on obtaining intellectual property rights, the scope of those rights, and the remedies for infringing, this course emphasizes the identification, valuation, and management of intellectual property assets both as a source of revenue and as part of a larger offensive or defensive litigation strategy. Topics covered also include intellectual property assets, management, and licensing in the context of tax and antitrust law. Students will be required to draft part of a license agreement or agreement to transfer ownership of an intellectual property asset. Time permitting, this course will also cover cross-border intellectual property transactions. At the conclusion of this course, a student should appreciate the role of intellectual property as part of creation and management of a larger enterprise.
Prerequisite(s):

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Litigation: Data, Theory, Practice, Process (2)
537M
Concentration(s):
The primary goal of this class is for students to learn how to leverage data, theory, and process to obtain better results in litigation. Students will explore sources of data and the use of decision theory, game theory, and economic analysis to evaluate claims, predict outcomes, and improve litigation strategies. The litigation process will be deconstructed beyond the mechanics of procedural rules and into the specific tasks lawyers must perform. Deconstructing the litigation process allows lawyers to properly staff matters, complete tasks more efficiently, and demonstrate the marginal return on investment for each task. Students will also learn a number of practical skills necessary to be an effective litigator. Among the topics addressed are early case assessment, client counseling, settlement negotiations, drafting persuasive pleadings and motions, managing discovery, persuading the fact finder, managing litigation projects, budgeting, and developing effective value-added litigation strategies.
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[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
[View All]


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