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Course Descriptions

[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
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Immigration Law (2)
541G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 353)
This course provides a general overview of U.S. immigration law and policy. The course will examine the admission, exclusion, deportation and naturalization of noncitizens in the United States, from constitutional foundations to daily practice issues. The course also will explore the rights of immigrants in employment, education, and public benefits, and will analyze the interaction of immigration law with other areas of law such as criminal law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Immigration Law Clinic I (6)
630R
Concentration(s):
Students engage with immigrant communities through direct client representation and systemic advocacy. The Immigration Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to experience the practice of law in a well-supervised and academically rigorous program that both prepares them for the practice of law and enables them to critically assess social justice issues. In addition to client representation and advocacy, students participate in a clinic seminar. Students are required to work an average of 20 hours per week. Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for details of application process).
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II or Research, Writing & Analysis, Advocacy

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Immigration Law Clinic II (0)
630S
Concentration(s):
A supplement to Immigration Law Clinic I, open to students who have successfully completed Immigration Law Clinic I, and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Students work on a clinic-based project developed in consultation with the professor. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of one to three credits.
Prerequisite(s): Immigration Law Clinic I
Prerequisite(s): Immigration Law Clinic I

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Indigenous Law and Policy Center (3)
630F
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 625)
This experiential learning course addresses the issues involved in
creating and operating tribal judiciaries, and the federal, state, and
tribal tax laws that affect tribal governance. Students learn about the
appellate process in tribal court systems, including preparation of
bench memoranda for pending cases in tribal appellate courts. Students
also have the opportunity to assist in developing tribal court
structures and improving tribal court administration. In addition,
students assist in drafting tribal tax codes, creating administrative
tax tribunals, and handling tax controversies for qualifying clients.
Other projects may include legislative and policy work for tribal
governments, including drafting and revising tribal laws and providing
legal assistance regarding land tenure systems.

Prerequisite(s):

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Indigenous Law and Policy Center II (3)
630G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 625A)
Prerequisite(s):

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Insurance Law (2)
514
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 379)
This course will offer a student of general topics such as (1) scope and function of insurance, (2) relation of insurer and insured, (3) construction of insurance contracts, (4) governmental regulation of insurance, (5) insurance agency and (6) broad categories of insurance coverage (property, person and liability). Specific areas of study will include insurance of automobiles, homes, commercial property and professional conduct, as well as special topics such as coordination-of-benefits, stacking, subrogation, errors and omissions, environmental coverage, duty-to-defend/reservation of rights, coverage litigation and bad faith/settlement issues. The primary method of instruction will be case study using traditional Socratic classroom techniques with open discussion. The course text will be supplemented with the most recent published appellate cases of significance. The instructor would seek to invite occasional guest lecturers on specific topics from time to time.
Prerequisite(s):

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Integrative Law & Social Work (3)
541J
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 474)
The Integrative Law and Social Work Seminar is offered only to law students
and second year master-level social work students accepted into the one-year
Chance at Childhood Program which begins each fall semester.

The spring course is a continuation of this two semester seminar that is
part of the Chance at Childhood Certificate Program. The certificate
program is designed to strengthen the knowledge base, practice and advocacy
skills of law students and master-level social work students interested in
working with abused, neglected and at-risk children and families. The
seminar emphasizes select issues related to child abuse and neglect from a
multi-disciplinary perspective.

Major: CHLD.

Must be in the Child and Family Advocacy Certificate program.
Prerequisite(s):

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Intellectual Property Law (0)
533V
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 321)

See Intellectual Property Survey.
Prerequisite(s):

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Intellectual Property Practicum (1)
535F
Concentration(s):
This class will revolve around the skills that young intellectual property attorneys are often forced to learn on the job while in practice as taught by practicing attorneys. Classes may involve lecture or class exercises as the topic dictates. The focus of the practicum will vary depending on practicing attorney availability. Assignments will encompass many types of topic-appropriate readings, including cases, practitioner guides, and CLE materials. Students are recommended to have taken either Patent Law, Intellectual Property Survey, or Patent Application Drafting.
Prerequisite(s): Patent Law or Intellectual Property Survey or Patent Application Preparation

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Intellectual Property Start-Up Project (0)
631A
Concentration(s):
Students will examine a diverse range of legal intellectual property law issues infused with pedagogical opportunity. Students will be required to engage in sophisticated factual and legal analyses and to broaden their horizons in learning how to problem-solve on behalf of their clients. Start-Up Project students will not simply learn legal skills through their efforts – they will experience aspects of lawyering that are not gleaned from other environments. By engaging in in-depth interviews with their clients, exploring cutting-edge intellectual property law issues and their various dimensions, forming plans and recommendations, and executing work, students will be forced to continuously reflect on the role of attorneys within the legal system. In particular, students will face a client with an invention and will have to provide guidance as to its patentability. This requires application of relevant patent law (subject matter, novelty, obviousness analyses) and prior art searches. Students may then proceed with the drafting of an actual patent. Enrollment is by permission only

Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites:
Research, Writing and Analysis
Advocacy
Patent Law

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Intellectual Property Survey (3)
535D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 321 and LAW 533V)

Formerly known as Intellectual Property Law. This course could be offered for 2 or 3 credits.
This course is a survey of all Intellectual Property law, including patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secret law. No technical degree is necessary.

Prerequisite(s): This course is not open to students who have taken 2 of the 3 following courses: Copyright Law, Patent Law, or Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law.

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Intellectual Property Thesis (0)
808A
Concentration(s):
This course is only open to foreign LL.M. students. The thesis in intellectual property law provides the opportunity for those already possessing a foreign law degree or in the last stages of their legal education in a foreign country to write a major research paper under the supervision of a professor with expertise in the field. The thesis is designed to meet degree requirements of foreign law schools or jurisdictions, which require a major scholarly work for degree award or bar admission. Permission of instructor required.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Alternative Dispute Resolution (0)
512N
Concentration(s):
The two main types of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) - arbitration and mediation - have had a long history of development in the United States (US). However, the use of both forms of ADR at the international level has increased exponentially in recent years, and the rules applicable to international arbitration and mediation have developed quite differently than in the US. This course will examine the law and procedure of international ADR, with a focus on ADR in the European Union (EU) and its similarities and differences with US ADR law. The New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards will be covered, along with the procedural rules of the major ADR service providers, especially the International Chamber of Commerce and the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, and the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) arbitration rules. With respect to mediation, the UNCITRAL mediation rules will be analyzed, together with applicable EU mediation law. Special attention will be given to the national mediation laws of East European states.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Business Transactions (2)
512B
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 363)This course is an introduction to international business transactions. We will explore the following general topics: agreements for the international trading of goods, financing the international sale of goods, establishing and operating a foreign investment, the resolution of international business disputes and enforcement of dispute settlement awards.
Prerequisite(s): Public International Law

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International Commercial Arbitration (3)
512K
Concentration(s):
International commercial arbitration is the most popular alternative dispute settlement mechanism for resolving disputes between parties arising out of international commercial transactions. The basic goal of this course is to give students a thorough understanding of the international commercial arbitration process and the role of national courts in supporting that process. The rules of international commercial arbitration institutions, such as the International Chamber of Commerce, and international conventions on commercial arbitration will be studied, including the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards. The UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration -- enacted by more than 60 countries -- will also be examined.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I

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International Corporate Governance (2)
508K
Concentration(s):
Corporate Governance involves the set of relationships among a company’s management, its board, its shareholders and its other stakeholders. The scope of these “other stakeholders” has been expanding dramatically in recent years, albeit at different rates and with differing results depending upon the jurisdiction. This term currently includes employees, suppliers, creditors, the surrounding communities, the environment, workers within the company’s supply chain and an ever-evolving panoply of additional parties with an interest in the operations and performance of the company. This course focuses on the broadening scope of such stakeholders in different jurisdictions and the impact of these developments on the internal governance of companies in those jurisdictions.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Environmental Law (3)
548E
Concentration(s):I
(Formerly DCL 417)
This course introduces the student to the use of bilateral and multilateral treaties and other international mechanisms for dealing with international environmental problems such as ozone in the upper atmosphere, the greenhouse effect, destruction of forest and trade in endangered species. Normally, a paper is required.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Food Laws and Regulations (3)
810D
Concentration(s):
The objective of this online course is to provide the student with an overview of the systems of food regulation practiced in different regions of the world including some of the cultural and social-economic factors which influence the regulation of food products in the specific region including issues such as genetic modification, importation, exportation, food additives, and regulatory compliance.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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International Human Rights (2)
548F
Concentration(s):
(Formerlty DCL 418)
This course explores human rights and the international legal order, background, concepts and the future. It will also consider major international agreements and their relation to local law, and remedies for the implementation of human rights.

Prerequisite(s):

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International Intellectual Property Law (2)
533E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 526)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
International Intellectual Property Law begins with overview of copyright, patents, trademarks and trade secrets under U.S. law, then looks at rapidly developing treaty regimes, reciprocal international legislation, and international cases for the protection of literary and artistic works and scientific invention, and ownership issues in the global markets that affect the rights of authors and inventors.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Law Colloquium (0)

Concentration(s):
Course description forthcoming pending faculty approval
Prerequisite(s):

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International Sale of Goods (2)
548G
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 478)
A study of international sales law under the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). Similarities and contrasts with sales law under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code will be investigated. Also addressed are the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts.

Prerequisite(s):

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International Taxation (2)
548J
Concentration(s):
The course will explore issues of tax policy in a variety of settings with the hope of providing students with the background necessary to understand basic tax principles as well as to contribute to the formation of tax laws and policies at home and abroad.
Prerequisite(s):

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International Trade Regulation (3)
512E
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 368)
The course has as its primary focus the international trade regime of the World Trade Organization to which the United States and 144 other countries are parties. The following topics are covered in this course:

- Introduction: Why trade? Why not protect?
- An overview of the GATT-WTO system
- WTO dispute settlement
- The unconditional, most-favored-nation obligation
- Tariff bindings
- The national treatment obligation
- The prohibition on quantitative restrictions (quotas)
- Transparency of national laws and regulations
- Regional trade arrangements (customs unions and free trade areas)
- Special and differential treatment of developing countries
- Trade in agricultural goods, including farm subsidies
- Trade and the environment
- Human, animal, and plant health and safety issues
- Trade and labor rights
- The General Agreement on Trade in Services
- The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights
- The new agenda: trade and investment, trade and competition policy
Prerequisite(s):

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Introduction to Comparative Law (1)

Concentration(s):
Course description forthcoming pending faculty approval
Prerequisite(s):

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Introduction to Islamic Law (1)
545F
Concentration(s):
The study of Islamic legal philosophy and the historical evolution of Islamic legal and jurisprudential systems that will include origins, nature, sources, and interpretive methodologies of classical Islamic law, and the main institution for upholding this law, the madhhab, or school of law, examining its development from the formative to the post-formative periods and highlighting important controversies generated along the way; Early encounter of Islamic law with modernity; and Exploration of several contemporary topics that have served as catalysts for new tensions and alternative approaches and interpretive theories.
Prerequisite(s):

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Introduction to Public International Law (1)
512P
Concentration(s):
The course is designed to introduce students to the specifics of the public international law with special emphasis on the sources of international law. Particular problems covered in each class are described below. Students will use class materials provided for them by the instructor (i.e. print outs of the power point presentations), class discussion, analysis of the opinions and judgments of the International Court of Justice and arbitration decisions, as well as work in groups will be used as instructing methods in addition to the elements of lecture.
Prerequisite(s):

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Investor Advocacy Clinic I (6)
631B
Concentration(s):
The Investor Advocacy Clinic (the “IAC”) exposes second and third year law students to securities litigation and regulation under the supervision of a licensed attorney. In addition to gaining securities and financial products litigation experience, students will learn about the regulatory organizations governing financial institutions and serve as important community resources by providing investor education. Although the caseload will vary each semester, students will draft arbitration and mediation materials and may litigate, mediate, settle, arbitrate or try cases. Students may also research and draft comment letters to provide analyses on proposed rules and regulations and will make community presentations about investor and financial protection topics. Clinic seminars will take two forms: topical and case rounds. Topical sessions focus on substantive law, procedure, policy or lawyering issues and will generally involve discussion of assigned reading or in-class exercises to highlight particular issues. Case rounds provide an opportunity to respond to legal, ethical, professional or policy issues arising in case work. Admission to the Investor Advocacy Clinic is by application only and requires a substantial time commitment of approximately twenty hours per week.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, or Advocacy, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Investor Advocacy Clinic II (6)
631C
Concentration(s):
This is a continuing opportunity for students who have successfully completed coursework in Investor Advocacy Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills and to assume greater responsibility with client matters. It also provides for assignment of more complex issues and an opportunity to assist with mentoring of Clinic I students.
Open to students who have successfully completed Investor Advocacy Clinic I and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of one to six credits (as agreed to by the Clinic Director), depending upon the student's participation level. The number of working hours required will be dependent on the credit hours determined.
Prerequisite(s): Investor Advocacy Clinic I

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Japanese Legal System (2)
512M
Concentration(s):
This course is a study of the Japanese Legal System. The course will provide an overview of the structure of the Japanese Legal System, the place of the legal system within the broader governmental system in Japan, Japanese Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Business Law and Civil Law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Jessup Team (2)
627E
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 405)
An international inter-school competition in international law, held annually in the spring semester. Team membership is by invitation on the basis of performance in the Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition. Participants receive two graded credit hours.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis, Transnational Legal Research

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Journal of Animal Law (2)
629C
Concentration(s):
The Journal of Animal Law was the second legal journal established in North America specializing in animal law and is currently one of only three existing that is dedicated to the specialized topic of animal law. The Journal of Animal Law has been able to welcome editors from other ABA-accredited law schools in addition to MSU College of Law.

The goals of the Journal of Animal Law are:
-To provide volumes of legal policy materials that relate to animal law and animal welfare.
-To provide expert explanation of the materials for both legal and non-legal audiences.
-To be an education resource for both the lawyer and the non-lawyer.
-To provide historical perspective about social and legal attitudes toward animals, and how we as a society have arrived at its present perspective.

Students must satisfy the following criteria to receive Journal credit: (1) two year participation on the Journal staff/board; (2)editing and cite-checking of papers submitted to the Journal; (3)satisfy editing obligation during the first-year on Journal staff; (4)election to Journal board for final year at the Law College; and (5) fulfill leadership obligations of Board position.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Journal of Business and Securities Law (1)
629D
Concentration(s):
The Journal of Business and Securities Law is an independent, student-run organization. Its purpose is to provide insight into legal issues surrounding the business community through legal analysis and other types of publications such as articles, personal narratives, and commentary. In furthering this purpose, the Journal accepts submissions written by active members of the legal community, faculty of established law schools, and other members of the legal profession. Additionally, the Journal accepts student contributions, including selected submissions from its Editorial Board and general members. The Journal anticipates a wide scope of topics on legal business issues such as corporate litigation, commercial transactions, employment, ecommerce, securities regulation, and any other topic focusing on the intersection of law and business.
Prerequisites: Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II OR Research, Writing & Analysis, and Advocacy

Prerequisite(s):

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Journal of International Law (2)
629A
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 550)
Participation by writing competition upon satisfactory completion by day students of two full semesters and by evening students of three full semesters. Two credits of ungraded credit earned upon completion of a student article, a comment, required production work and participation in the organization of the International Law Symposium and the International Achievement Award Dinner.

Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Journal of Medicine and Law (2)
629B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 407)
Two credits may be awarded to a member of the journal during the student's final semester if the student has completed a student article and a Regional Reporter article; satisfactorily completed all work assignments, training sessions, cite check workshops and assignments; and attended all mandatory meetings; participated in the organization of a journal event; actively participated in at least one committee per semester. Prior to registering for credit, a Journal member must obtain authorization by the editor-in-chief, and present authorization to the Office of the Registrar during enrollment.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Juvenile Law (2)
541K
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 378)
A survey of the law related to juvenile courts in the areas of delinquency and child neglect, including jurisdiction and waivers thereof, arrest, pre-trial, and trial procedure and disposition.

Prerequisite(s):

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[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
[View All]


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