Skip to main content, skip to search, or skip to the top of the page.

Course Descriptions

[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
[View All]

Canadian Charter of Rights (2)
548A
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 340)
This course will provide a general introduction to the principles of the Canadian Charter of Rights. Among the topics to be covered will be the fundamental freedoms under the charter, democratic rights, mobility rights, legal rights, language rights, equality rights, enforcement and application of the charter, and the override clause.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Canadian Summer Law Placement (6)
634
Concentration(s):Int'l & Comparative Law
(Formerly DCL 392)
This course primarily involves a closely monitored placement during the summer in Canada under the sponsorship of outstanding Canadian lawyers, judges or members of Parliament with legal affair responsibilities. An intensive introductory course by Canadian law faculty on Canada and the Canadian legal system precedes the individual placements, which are accompanied by weekly seminars, a Canadian speakers program and cultural field events. Students will complete two thoughtfully researched papers on legal issues of current interest in Canada.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Capital Punishment (3)
579Y
Concentration(s):
A focus on federal constitutional law, primarily the 8th Amendment and its regulation of capital punishment. The federal constitutional law largely regulates state criminal law. Using the 8th Amendment and state criminal laws, the course will consider how death eligibility is defined and administered. It will explore the limits imposed by the Constitution and by various state and federal statutes. The course also will consider larger questions including, Why have the death penalty? Is the system working? Is it necessary? Is it fair? What changes should be made? As part of this inquiry we will consider the role of race in capital punishment, the impact of wrongful convictions, and recent moves to abolish or limit capital punishment in several jurisdictions. The course also examines the law of federal habeas corpus in the context of the death penalty. This section engages in a close reading of a complicated set of statutes, as well as the Supreme Court decisions construing those statutes.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Capstone Intellectual Property and Communications Law Seminar (1)
535E
Concentration(s):
This course uses presentations by leading scholars of their works-in-progress in the area of IP and communications law. Students will be responsible for reading the papers, writing a critique, preparing questions and participating in the seminar.. This course is highly recommended for all students who wish to write a ULWR or law review note in intellectual property, information, or communications law in a subsequent semester.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Chance at Childhood Clinic (4)
631F
Concentration(s):
The Clinic provides a setting for law and social work students to gain experience in child advocacy. The Clinic provides a forum for advocating for children, both in individual cases and through seeking to affect public policy and practice within the state of Michigan. Student teams will serve in a variety of roles to effectively advocate for children.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspective and Advocacy

Top

Chapter 11 Reorganization (3)
506F
Concentration(s):
This course provides an in-depth examination of the issues that arise inside Chapter 11. The course focus is transactional. The students will have to draft various documents, including a chapter 11 plan for a hypothetical debtor.
Prerequisite(s): Consumer Bankruptcy

Top

Child Advocacy (2)
541A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 446)
This class is designed to acquaint future attorneys and social workers with their unique roles and responsibilities in representing and advocating for children and families as they interact with the state government: its departments, agencies, laws and rules.

Prerequisite(s):

Top

Civil Litigation Practice and Procedure for Foreign Lawyers (3)
805
Concentration(s):
This course explains the litigation process in the United States. It is designed to equip foreign-educated lawyers with the skills needed to manage lawsuits involving companies located abroad or subsidiary companies in the United States. The explanation includes (1) the jurisdiction of Unites States courts over lawsuits by or against these companies, (2) the procedures for filing or accepting a Complaint under the Hague Convention for the Service of Process Abroad and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure; (3) discovery under the Federal Rules, especially emerging requirements for electronic data, and the Hague Convention on the Taking of Evidence Abroad; (4) Rule 30(b)(6) requirements for testimony by corporate witnesses; (5) discovery sanctions; (6) trial procedures, particularly the use of company documents, witness testimony, and government investigations and recall orders as evidence; and, finally, appeal procedures.

The fundamental practice skills involve selection of counsel; preparation of case budgets and management of legal fees; early evaluation of cases to decide if they should be tried or settled, and determining settlement values; negotiating settlements; mediating cases; collecting and producing documents and e-data; obtaining confidentiality agreements for proprietary information; preparing witnesses for deposition and trial, as well as at Congressional hearings (especially foreign company witnesses); and preparing for media requests, particularly during trial. These procedures and practice skills will come alive through the use of real-world examples. Students enrolled in this course are not eligible to enroll in International civil Litigation (548K) Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.

Prerequisite(s):

Top

Civil Procedure I (4)
530A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly 500A and 500B)
A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Civil Rights Clinic I (4)
630X
Concentration(s):
Students will receive a versatile and well-rounded education in the intricacies of civil rights law and hone client management, case management, negotiation, and trial skills. Students will use their knowledge and skills to litigate civil rights cases in federal District Court (WD, MI) for their clients, prisoners who are incarcerated in Michigan and have asserted claims about the conditions of their confinement. Under the supervision of clinic faculty, students will represent their clients at all stages of these cases, including case development and strategy, discovery, motion practice, and trial. In addition to class times, students enrolled in this clinical program must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week NOTE: (1) Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for the application deadline). Preference will be given to students who commit to participate in the clinic for two semesters. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisite(s): All student clinicians enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic I must have successfully completed RWA and Advocacy. In addition, they must have successfully completed the first year (six credits) of the Law Colleges TPI program or must have successfully completed at least six credits in Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Rights Seminar, Complex Civil Litigation, or Constitutional Law II.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Civil Rights Clinic II (4)
630Z
Concentration(s):
This is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Civil Rights Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling clients, managing a caseload, and litigating civil rights cases on their clients’ behalf in federal District Court. Typically, students who are enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic II assume a more in-depth role in their clients’ litigation. As in Civil Rights Clinic I, students further their experience under the supervision of clinic faculty and enhance their knowledge of civil rights law and trial practice. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12 to15 hours weekly). NOTE: (1) Enrollment in Civil Rights Clinic II is by invitation only. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Rights Clinic I

Top

Civil Trial Advocacy I (2)
587B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 472)

Evidence may be taken concurrently with Advocacy I, but extra preparation may be necessary.

Advocacy I begins your journey into civil trial practice. Using a circuit court forum and the Michigan Court Rules, we will explore discovery in the context of a typical case from the filing of a complaint to the first day of trial. Students will draft complaints, answers and affirmative defenses, propound written discovery, take fact and expert depositions, prepare and argue motions and mediation, and prepare for trial. There will be role-play as plaintiff or defense counsel. The final grade is a compilation of oral in-class performance and participation, and written assignments.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Civil Trial Advocacy II (2)
587C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 411)
Civil Trial Advocacy II continues your journey into civil trial practice. Using a circuit court forum and the Michigan Court Rules, we will explore trial practice in the context of a typical tort case from the first day of trial to closing arguments. Students will engage in all aspects of trial practice, oral and written, and take a case through trial. Students will be assigned the role of plaintiff or defense counsel. In-class performance and written assignments will be individually graded. The final grade is a compilation of these.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisites are Civil Procedure II, Evidence and Civil Trial Advocacy I or a complete understanding of the Michigan Court rules regarding discovery.


Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Civil Procedure II, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Evidence

Top

Client Counseling and Interviewing (2)
591A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 450)
This course adopts a client-centered approach in looking at legal problems and examines how to make clients partners in problem solving. Attention is paid to the economic, social and psychological aspects of clients' legal problems. The course starts with an examination of fundamental counseling skills, followed by an analysis of the information gathering process and ultimate decision making.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Evidence

Top

Climate Change Law and Policy (2)
566K
Concentration(s):
This course will expose students to scientific evidence in support of climate change and the impacts to human health, natural resources, and human development; international law and policy developments, with an introduction to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and a discussion of the Kyoto Protocol and post-Kyoto international action; exploration of U.S. efforts to address climate impacts through national legislation; review of the judiciary's reaction to climate change; examination of efforts to regulate greenhouse gas emissions under the Clean Air Act and other federal laws; and assess regional, state and local responses to climate change focusing, in particular, on their relationship to national law and policy.
Students will participate in a negotiation exercise comprised of several groups with distinct interests and perspectives on climate change. This exercise is intended to enhance students' understanding of the policy constraints, political dynamics and practical realities associated with developing climate change law and policy. Students will learn about corporate responses to climate change, considering the equity, human rights and environmental justice impacts of climate change, and the challenges linked to transitioning from a high carbon to a low carbon economy.


Prerequisite(s):

Top

Closely- Held Business: Shareholder and Member Disputes (2)
593J
Concentration(s):
This course will examine the common problems, issues, actions, and defenses associated with closely-held business owner's disputes in both a corporate and limited liability company context utilizing Michigan Law as an example. The course will review these problems and issues from an owner's perspective as well as from the business's perspective. This course is designed for those students desiring to become transactional business attorneys to give those students a working knowledge of the basics of this area of the law so that they may consult with business owners both before and after disputes arise, provide strategic and interpretive support to litigation attorneys in the advent of litigation amongst owners, and draft appropriate entity governance documents. A segment of the course will also discuss measures and actions that may be taken to prevent, minimize, or discourage disputes. This will be an interdisciplinary course where students will be able to use concepts of tort, contract, real estate, corporate, limited liability company, employment, tax and potentially many other areas of law. Classroom panel discussions based on actual Michigan case complaints and a final paper will be required in lieu of a final examination.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

Top

Codex Alimentarius (3)
810F
Concentration(s):
This course is to familiarize students with the history, development and workings of the Codex Alimentarius Commission in formulating and harmonizing food standards and ensuring their global implementation.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

Top

Commercial Transactions Survey (3)
501M
Concentration(s):
This course primarily surveys sales of goods (UCC Article 2) and payment systems (UCC Articles 3 and 4) under the Uniform Commercial Code. The course may also address issues relating to leases of goods (UCC Article 2A), the law relating to shipping and storing goods (UCC Article 7), letters of credit (UCC Article 5), and state sales law relating to investment securities (UCC Article 8). These subjects are often tested on many state bar exams. Students who have taken Sales & Leases and/or Payment Systems are not eligible to take this course.

Prerequisite(s): Contracts

Top

Communication Skills for Lawyers (3)
591G
Concentration(s):
This course is designed for students who desire to improve their oral advocacy and public speaking skills in a supportive environment. Course components include the study and practice of the elements of oral advocacy, including critical analysis and the development of effective public speaking techniques. This is primarily an experiential learning course with a focus on the delivery and critique of short oral exercises. Much of the course structure follows possible pre-trial developments in a fictional legal case; students will be asked to step into the roles of parties and participants and advocate their positions through presentations, negotiations and oral argument. Students will learn strategic interviewing and negotiation skills, the significance of nonverbal body language, effective ways to present a client’s “story” and persuasive oral argument and public speaking techniques. Students must complete two practice arguments which may fall outside of normal class hours. This course is open to both J.D. and LL.M. (foreign-educated lawyer) students. J.D. students must have completed RWA and Advocacy, LL.M. students must have taken RWA:LL.M. LL.M. students who have previously taken “Advocacy for Foreign-Educated Lawyers” are not eligible to take this course.
Prerequisite(s): RWA I; RWA II OR Research, Writing & Analysis; Advocacy or RWA:LL.M. This course may not be taken by students in the TPI program.

Top

Communications Law and Policy (3)
533Q
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 588) Examines the regulatory regimes governing the major modes of communications in the United States, including wireline telephony, wireless telephony, the internet, broadcast and cable. Particular attention will be given to the economic rationales for and critiques or regulation. Readings and class assignments will focus on current legal and regulatory debates in communications policy to provide students with a practical introduction to regulatory law.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Comparative Environmental Law (2)
566M
Concentration(s):
Countries worldwide face a similar set of environmental challenges and health and safety risks. The environmental regimes that industrialized nations have put in place in response to these risks reveal both similarities and striking differences in their approaches. This course addresses these differences, their potential explanations, and their implications for the design and reform of environmental policy. We will focus especially on the comparison between American and European response to a variety of environmental risks (climate change, genetically modified foods, risk from chemicals) and broader American/European divisions regarding the precautionary principle. In addition, the course will compare the constitutional foundations, institutional arrangements, and regulatory tools typical of the regulatory regimes under consideration. Unlike courses in International Environmental Law, this class will not address international treaties or problems of transboundary pollution. Instead, it will focus on the domestic law of the respective national, or international (EU), systems.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Comparative Law: European Union and Eastern European Trade and Business Practices (1)

Concentration(s):
The course will focus on the internal market of the European Union and the Eastern European countries’ adjustments to the new rules. Selected comparative issues will be presented based on the practices of different states as well as solutions used in the world trade mechanisms and in the US. Students will be introduced to the specifics of the internal market of the European Union including its trade and customs policies. Five major freedoms of the internal market will be discussed based on cases and real-life problems: free movement of workers (including citizenship of the EU), free movement of goods, free movement of services, free movement of payment and investments, as well as the freedom of establishment.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Complex Civil Litigation (2)
591B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 528)

This course will examine advanced civil procedure topics that arise in the context of complex civil litigation, from both the plaintiff's and defendant's perspectives. Although Civil Procedure I is not a prerequisite for this courses, it is strongly recommended.
Prerequisite(s): Suggested Prerequisites: Civil Procedure I (500A) & II (500B) or Civil Procedure I (530A)

Top

Conflict of Laws (3)
550
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 460)
Students who have taken Topics in Conflict of Laws (550A) may not take this course. Conflict of Laws is divided into three parts: (1) personal jurisdiction, (2) choice of law, and (3) full faith and credit to sister-state and foreign-country judgments. The course begins with an examination of the personal jurisdiction of courts and limitations on the exercise of that jurisdiction. The issues to be considered include the following: Where may suit be brought? Given two or more choices of forum, where is it best to bring suit? Next, the course addresses issues concerning the recognition and enforcement of sister-state judgments, as well as foreign country judgments. Finally, the course examines the body of common law known as choice of law. The issues we will address include the following: (1) Which states' rule of decision (substantive law) in a multi-state setting is to be applied to resolve a particular dispute, for example, a dispute over a contract entered into in State A but to be performed in State B, or a multi-state tort, such as negligence? (2) When may a state apply its own law to resolve a dispute without violating the Constitution? (3) When must a state apply federal law or the law of a sister state to resolve a dispute? (4) When must federal courts apply state law to resolve a dispute?
The subject of Conflict of Laws is now tested on the essay portion of the bar exam in more than half the states, including Michigan.

Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I

Top

Conflict Resolution Clinic I (4)
631D
Concentration(s):
This clinic will focus on teaching students to be problem solvers which is a fundamental skill that lawyers need regardless of the work they do or the setting in which they do this work. The primary method of problem solving that the students will learn is mediation which is increasingly used by lawyers and sometimes mandated by courts, agencies, and organizations to resolve controversies. This course will provide an opportunity to learn the theory, skills, and professionalism issues associated with mediation and conflict resolution. Students will have opportunities to hone and enhance their learning by applying their skills to real problems presented by real people. By doing so, they will provide access to justice to people who would otherwise be unable to afford services.

Professionalism and ethics will be an essential component of the program. Students will be expected to identify, research, and discuss the challenges that they are facing with an eye towards what kind of professional they want to become no matter where they work. They will not only look at the Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct for Lawyers and the Michigan Supreme Court Standards of Conduct for Mediators to inform their discussions, they will be expected to consider the cultural, economic, psychological, moral, policy, and personal implications of choices that they make.

A key component of the clinic is to train students to be reflective practitioners who continue to learn from their experiences for the rest of their professional lives. The students will explicitly be taught to engage in meaningful reflection about their own work and the work of the other professionals with whom they come into contact.

Enrollment is by permission only

Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective; and Advocacy.

Top

Constitutional Law I (2)
500C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 171)
An introduction to American constitutional law. This course surveys the distribution of national powers among the Congress, the president and the federal judiciary. After examining the fundamentals of judicial review and its limitations, the course considers the delegated powers of Congress and the tensions between Congress and the president in the exercise of national powers. The course concludes with an overview of governmental immunities. Some sections of Regulatory State and constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.

Prerequisite(s):

Top

Constitutional Law II (4)
500N
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 172)
A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Constitutional Law of the European Union (2)
579V
Concentration(s):
Introduces the EU substantive law of constitutional significance. Coverage will include, though not be limited to, such topics as the European Union's path of legal integration; the institutional structure of the EU; the European Union's sources of law and its substantive, temporal and territorial jurisdiction; the fundamental documents of the European Union including its (nearly adopted) "Constitution"; the main substantive principles underlying EU Law and the role of EU law in the domestic law of Member states; enlargement of the European Union and options of its institutional reform. A student may not take both this course and European Union Law.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Constitutional Law of the European Union (Study Abroad) (1)
545C
Concentration(s):
This course is dedicated to the main problems of the structure and law of the European Union. Students will be introduced to the evolution of the European Communities and European Union and the present comparison to the federal structure of the United States. The course will also explain the specificity of the supranational character of the EU law, including the sources of law, the principles governing the legal order and the implementation of the EU law in the member states. In addition, the judicial institutions will be presented, with special emphasis on the Court of Justice of the European Union and its role in the interpretation of the EU law.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Constitutional Law Topics: Free Expression (2)
551B
Concentration(s):
(Formlery DCL 554)
The course focuses on the theory and history of speech.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Constitutional Litigation (3)
579X
Concentration(s):
This course provides a rigorous examination of the intricacies initiated by individuals seeking to vindicate federal constitutional rights. Primary emphasis will be placed on suits under 42 U.S.C §1983 against state and local governmental entities and their officials. Through a careful study of the many doctrines that the U.S. Supreme Court has pronounced and developed in connection with litigation under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 and Bivens, students will gain a significant understanding of and appreciation for the challenges that confront a constitutional claimant both in establishing liability and in obtaining a remedy. In particular, the course will focus on the essential elements of a § 1983 action, such as the requirement that the defendant have acted “under color of” state or local law, as well as the need to demonstrate that the constitutional violation at issue flowed from an official policy or custom in cases where the defendant is a municipality. There will also be substantial treatment of the various defenses that officials sued in their individual capacity may assert, including absolute immunity (available to those who perform legislative, judicial, and prosecutorial functions), qualified immunity, and res judicata. In addition, the availability of remedies such as damages, injunctive relief, and attorney fees will be explored.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Construction Law (2)
601
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 314)
A survey of legal issues with respect to the construction industry. Topics discussed include bid errors, contract disputes, and payment issues. Students will be given an overview of project delivery systems, and the contract clauses found in proprietary and industry standard contract documents. Suretyship and mechanic's lien laws are an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Consumer Bankruptcy (3)
506E
Concentration(s):
This course examines a portion of state debt collection law and a basic overview of bankruptcy fundamentals with a focus on consumer bankruptcy practice under Chapters 7 and 13 of the Bankruptcy Code. While there are no prerequisites, it is strongly recommended that students take Secured Transactions either prior to or at the same this course is taken.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Consumer Law (2)
593G
Concentration(s):
This course examines special requirements for consumer transactions. It includes deception in the marketplace, including many disclosure requirements; credit (discrimination, accuracy, and other limitations),; debt collection practices; and consumer remedies. Both federal and state laws will be covered. One focus will be how these requirements supersede normal contract, tort, and property laws. Civil, administrative, and criminal actions will be addressed.


Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II, Property, Torts I

Top

Contract Drafting (3)
594A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL370) The specific purpose of this class is to use contract principles that the student has learned in the first year as a vehicle to develop the student's abilities as a planner and counselor. It will involve the study of some of the common pitfalls encountered in contract drafting and called upon to perform specific exercises in which the student will use her/his basic knowledge of contracts to draft various documents. In the course of the drafting, the student will be required to predict what may happen, provide for that contingency and attempt to protect the client.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II

Top

Contract Negotiation (1)
530F
Concentration(s):
This course introduces first-year students to principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in mock negotiation exercises.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Contract Theory Seminar (2)
594B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 600)
This course will explore the theoretical and jurisprudential basis for enforcement of promises. Readings and discussions will address historical and anthropological conceptions of contract, comparative analyses of the civil and common law of contracts and gift promises, theoretical justifications for state enforcement of promises and modern challenges to contract doctrines and principles such as freedom of contract and private autonomy.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II

Top

Contracts (4)
530B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E)
A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Copyright Law (3)
533B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 375)
According to Article 1, Section 8, Clause 8 of the U.S. Constitution, Congress has the power to promote the "progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries." Congress has adopted copyright statutes to protect forms of expression, which include computer software. This course will explore the history of copyright protection, with a particular emphasis on entertainment litigation.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Corporate Finance (3)
508B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 380)
In Corporate Finance the principles of accounting and valuation and the basic financial environment of closely held companies and public companies will be examined. Building on this foundation, the fundamental issues surrounding common stock, preferred stock and debt will be analyzed. Finally, all these fundamentals will be applied in examining financial issues with mergers and acquisitions and tender offers and in understanding how "deals" are done. Students who have not taken Business Enterprises are permitted to enroll in this course if they are simultaneously enrolled in Business Enterprises.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

Top

Corporate Income Taxation (3)
508C
Concentration(s):Tax; and also Corporate
(Formerly DCL 465)
The course will focus on federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders, the tax consequences of choice of entity, the formation and liquidations of corporations, the taxation of corporations and shareholders, and the tax aspects of S corporations. EITHER Basic Income Tax A OR Basic Income Tax B fulfills the prerequisite. If the system will not let you register with either of these prerequisites, please contact the Registrar's Office.
Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation A, Basic Income Taxation B

Top

Corporate Law and Policy Seminar (2)
508D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 483)
This advanced seminar in corporate law will cover one or more practice areas of contemporary importance. Past or planned topics include private equity, corporate speech and political activity, and investor conflicts. The course will attempt a thorough treatment of relevant positive law, and address positive and normative issues of corporate regulation by courts and policy makers. Students will also be expected to engage with the economic, financial and business issues which every successful corporate practitioner should understand. The materials will consist of cases, statutes, scholarly articles, policy proposals and other readings. There are no formal prerequisites, but students are strongly advised to have taken a course in corporate law or corporate governance. The seminar may quickly dive into concepts that will be difficult to understand without some familiarity with corporate law principles.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Corporate Law and Policy: Corporate Governance and Compliance (2)
508F
Concentration(s):
A survey of issues in corporate governance and compliance in light of the legal risks faced by corporations and corporate directors and officers in the legal environment presented by securities law, antitrust, tort law, environmental law, and other sources of liability. Specific topics include risk management, Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley, internal compliance programs, and corporate codes of conduct and codes of behavior.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Criminal Law (3)
500F
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 131)
An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (3)
616C
Concentration(s):Criminal Law
(Formerly Criminal Procedure II) This course examines various issues associated with criminal adjudications with a focus on federal constitutional rights. The course covers issues such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, bail and pretrial detention, discovery, the plea bargaining process, speedy trial rights, federal sentencing guidelines, and post-conviction review. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Criminal Procedure: Investigation in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure II are ineligible to enroll in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Criminal Procedure: Investigation (3)
616B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Criminal Procedure: Investigation (LL.M.) (3)
616B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 303) This course is for LL.M students only. A close examination of power and limitations in gathering evidence, proceedings before trial, essentials of a fair trial, post-conviction powers and limitations, quasi-criminal proceedings and pretrial detention.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Criminal Trial Advocacy I - PreTrial (2)
617A
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 470)
This practical course is designed to familiarize the student with the criminal justice process. The course consists of lectures and exercises covering criminal case initiation, the initial appearance, indictments, plea negotiations, pretrial discovery and pretrial motions leading up to up to a trial. Special emphasis will be placed on criminal procedure.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Criminal Law

Top

Criminal Trial Advocacy II Trial (2)
617B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 471)
This course is designed to develop the student's trial skills for criminal law practice. The course consists of lecture and participation in practical exercises covering opening statements, introduction of evidence, direct and cross-examination, and closing arguments. Each student, paired with a trial partner, will be required to complete a criminal trial final exam against a second pair of students. Students may take the prerequisite, Evidence, concurrently.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

Top

Criminal Trial Advocacy III Post-Conviction Remedies (2)
617C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 433)
This course focuses on the representation issues raised during the critical stage of sentencing. The following topics are covered: duties/function of counsel, statutes, types of sentencing, indeterminate sentencing, length, sentencing plan, credit for time served, concurrent/consecutive, PSIs, considerations, habitual offender, altering sentences, probation, violations, restitution, alternatives, plea bargaining, guilty pleas, Proposal B, good time); sentencing guidelines demonstration; post-conviction motions; criminal appeals; parole; habeas corpus, state and federal; prisoners' rights; and sentencing reform/capital punishment.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Current Issues in Securities Regulation (2)
524C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW 503) This course will address current issues in securities regulation including: evolving market structures; broker-dealer regulation and inter-relationships with brokerage firms, issuers and customers; investment adviser regulation; advanced issues in private placement; recent developments in SEC investigations, enforcement proceedings and related criminal actions; public company regulation; and professional obligations for attorneys and accountants.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

Top

Cyber Law (3)
533C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 455)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
This course gives a broad overview of some of the main areas in which technology has challenged traditional legal doctrines and the way we practice law. Technology law is more than just "computer law" or "cyberlaw." It is Internet law and information law. Some of the topics that will be covered are: 1) privacy issues; 2) liability of online information providers; 3) conducting business in cyberspace; 4) Internet and computer use policies in business, university and government; 5) cybercrimes and law enforcement; 6) technology license agreement and software purchase contracts; and 7) using computer-generated evidence or data.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Decedents' Estates and Trusts (4)
501D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 210)
A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes
and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Design Thinking for Legal Services (2)
537P
Concentration(s):
This course prepares the law student to address the competitive landscape of the legal services market faced by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession. It fosters actionable skills and knowledge that translate into creative problem solving for business – their own or that of their clients. This class focuses on design thinking and its methodologies that can uniquely and powerfully address the problems/challenges involved in the business of law. An overview of all phases of this methodology will be undertaken, including empathy and creative intelligence, business modeling, and business/service design. Students will also examine many of the methods, tools, and exercises that are key to unlocking business value as achieved through design thinking. This course provides background preparation for operating a legal practice (small or large), a non-lawyer business, aiding clients in achieving business goals, and otherwise becoming a business-enabled lawyer or business leader.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Directed Study (0)
624
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 690)
Students may receive credit for research and writing in areas of interest to them. This must be worked out in advance with a member of the full-time faculty. Ordinarily a paper of at least 20 pages is required, not counting endnotes, for two hours credit. A maximum of four credit hours may be applied towards graduation. Students on Reexamination Probation II are ineligible for directed studies.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

Directed Study – Summer Academy in Global Food Law & Policy (3)
624
Concentration(s):
The Summer Academy in Global Food Law & Policy is an established one-week summer program that brings together practitioners, policymakers, industry representatives and leading academics working in the field of food law and policy. It offers intensive training on the most innovative developments in global food regulation and provides a unique opportunity for professional development and networking in an informal and inter-disciplinary setting. By talking, studying and interacting with food experts from all over the world, participants are able to gain new perspectives into both their own sectors and international regulatory issues. This is achieved by combining traditional classroom instruction with experiential learning opportunities offered by dedicated and distinguished international experts. Directed study credit will be awarded to students enrolled in this course.
Prerequisite(s): Intended for students in the Global Food Law program only

Top

Domestic Violence (2)
541B
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 427)
A historical background of Domestic Violence. Focus will be placed on understanding the nature of domestic violence, the prevention of domestic violence, and the survivor and batterer behavior.
Prerequisite(s):

Top

[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
[View All]


Skip to main content, skip to search, or skip to the top of the page.