Summer 2019 Schedule

(Updated: Tuesday, August 27, 2019 4:47 PM)

View schedule sorted by: Course Name, Date Modified, Groupings, Professor

Date key: M-Monday, T-Tuesday, W-Wednesday, R-Thursday, F-Friday

Electives
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Advanced Legal Research / Domann, Bre.586 / 730 97P6TDOnline15 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
2 Advanced Legal Research / Hanna, Hil.586 / 731 97P6TEOnline15 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
2 Advanced Legal Research / Eicher, All.586 / 732 97P7MTOnline15 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
2 Basic Income Taxation / McCormick, Amy.501K / 001 97P6TFTR/1:00pm-2:40pm45 346 07-02-2019 1:30 PM
This survey course introduces the basic concepts of federal income taxation and is ideal for students interested in learning basic information about tax law but who are not yet certain if they want to specialize in tax or business fields. Students will get practice in the skills of statutory construction and applying a broad range of legal authorities to clients’ concrete problems, skills which are valuable for all law students regardless of whether they ultimately specialize in tax. In this course, students will be exposed to tax issues that affect individuals, including sole proprietorships, and will gain an understanding of various forms of income, exclusions from income, capital gains and losses, various deductions, and other topics. The course uses a modified Socratic approach with an emphasis on problem solving that will allow students to develop facility in analyzing cases, statutes, and administrative materials. Sample examination questions are provided to allow a student to determine how well he or she learned and retained the material. The grade in the course is based on a final examination with consideration given to class participation. Students who enroll in Basic Income Taxation for 2 credits are ineligible to enroll in Basic Income Taxation for 3 credits.
3 Criminal Procedure: Investigation / Candeub, Ada.616B / 730 97P6THOnline60 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Thompson, Chr.625D / 001 97P9E6Arranged8 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Thompson, Chr.625D / 730 97P9E7Online22 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Thompson, Chr.625D / 731 97P9E8Online4 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
3 Mediation Advocacy and Civil Facilitative Mediator Training / Pappas, Bri.587E / 001 97P6TTJune 14, 15, 21, 22, 23, 201918 325 06-23-2019 8:00 AME P S
This course meets the civil facilitative mediator training requirement as required by Michigan Court Rule and the Michigan State Court Administrative Office (SCAO). With this training, and the completion of additional requirements, students will be able to apply for inclusion on court mediation rosters. The course includes a variety of graded assignments, including drafting an agreement to mediate (with adequate confidentiality provisions), a post-mediation agreement (with mediation clause), and a mediation representation plan. By balancing theory with practice and paying particular attention to mediation ethics, students completing this course will be prepared to both mediate civil cases and effectively advocate for clients in mediation. Students who have taken Mediation Advocacy and Domestic Relations Mediator Training may not take this course.
3 Street Law - Teaching Law to High School Students / Rosa, Jen.630K / 301 97P6TUW/6:00pm-8:00pm Contact Registrar Office for override12 325 No Exam,
The class is a three-credit course and includes up to 12 law students who teach in pairs in various Lansing high school social studies classes. The substance of the course utilizes discussion of landmark Supreme Court cases in the context of hypothetical fact patterns that relate to the high school students' lives. The topics of the classes can include the American Legal System, Constitutional Law, and Criminal Law. The law student instructors use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings that the student instructors practice in a weekly seminar at the law school. The course has two components: a 100-minute weekly seminar, and a field component in which the law students teach in one-hour increments. Law students are responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once the plans are approved by both the Law School faculty member and the high school teacher. Students' grades are based in part on their performance during the training and seminar portions of the course and in part on their performance in the high school classrooms that are monitored by the law school faculty member. The credit/no credit option cannot be elected.
Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, Constitutional Law II, Criminal Law
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Clinics
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Tax Clinic I / Wease, Jos.630C / 001 97P6TVTR/10:00am-12:00pm4 335 No Exam, E P S
(Formerly DCL 476) Students enrolled in Tax Clinic I become "client ready" by representing clients with respect to a broad range of federal, state, and local tax controversies. Students advocate for their clients by working through a variety of administrative determinations, as well as by routinely participating in collection due process and Appeals hearings before the Internal Revenue Service and informal conferences before the Michigan Department of Treasury. In addition, they litigate cases in the United States Tax Court, the Michigan Tax Tribunal, the United States District Courts, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and Michigan appellate courts. Students also counsel ESL taxpayers about their rights and responsibilities under the Internal Revenue Code, and engage in numerous outreaches designed to educate the public about tax issues and requirements. All work takes place under the guidance and close supervision of experienced clinical faculty. Class sessions focus not only on substantive tax issues, but also on professional development, ethical considerations, policy matters, and client and case management. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours - in addition to class time - during the semester, and are expected to participate in a one-day orientati1n scheduled before the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisite(s): For students admitted before Fall 2011, Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II; for students admitted in Fall 2011 and later, Research, Writing & Analysis and Advocacy.
4 Tax Clinic II / Wease, Jos.630D / 001 97P6TWTBD0 No Exam, E P S
(Formerly DCL 515) Tax Clinic II is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Tax Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling and representing clients, to take on more complex assignments, and to assist in mentoring Tax Clinic I students. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours during the semester.
Prerequisite(s): Tax Clinic I
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Study Abroad
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 International Business Transactions / Cherry, Chr.512B / 750 97P6TNMay 13-June 8, 2019 12:30pm-2:42pm9 In Japan Take Home Exam, P
This course is an introduction to international business transactions. We will explore the following general topics: agreements for the international trading of goods, financing the international sale of goods, establishing and operating a foreign investment, the resolution of international business disputes and enforcement of dispute settlement awards.
2 International Commercial Arbitration / Takahashi, Koj.512K / 750 97P6TPMay 13-June 8, 2019 9:45am-11:13am9 In Japan Take Home Exam, P
International commercial arbitration is the most popular alternative dispute settlement mechanism for resolving disputes between parties arising out of international commercial transactions. The basic goal of this course is to give students a thorough understanding of the international commercial arbitration process and the role of national courts in supporting that process. The rules of international commercial arbitration institutions, such as the International Chamber of Commerce, and international conventions on commercial arbitration will be studied, including the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards. The UNCITRAL Model Law on International Commercial Arbitration -- enacted by more than 60 countries -- will also be examined.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I
2 Japanese Legal System / Jones, Col.512M / 750 97P6TRMay 13-June 8, 2019 9:45am-11:13am7 In Japan Take Home Exam, P
This course is a study of the Japanese Legal System. The course will provide an overview of the structure of the Japanese Legal System, the place of the legal system within the broader governmental system in Japan, Japanese Constitutional Law, Criminal Law, Business Law and Civil Law.
3 Law and Religion / Ravitch, Fra.579K / 750 97P6TSMay 13-June 8, 2019 12:30pm-2:42pm7 In Japan Take Home Exam, P
(Formerly DCL 530) This course will focus on church/state law -- the legal doctrines that have arisen in cases under the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. The course will explore the role of law in various religious traditions and the role of religion in law and public discourse. Topics addressed include school prayer, government aid to religious institutions (including school vouchers and charitable choice), government endorsement of religious symbols, the role of public forum doctrine in religion cases, freedom of religious expression, and the freedom to practice one's religion.
1 Topics in Comparative Copyright / Cross, Joh.535J / 750 97P6TXJuly 7-23, 2019 11:00am-11:55am11 In Croatia Take Home Exam, P
This course will expose students, from a comparative perspective, different national treatments of copyright and trademark law. Beginning with an examination of various justifications for IP protection, the court sees how countries share and differ over the purposes and function of copyright law and trademark within their jurisdictions. Special attention will be paid to the role of IP in protecting food and local cultural production.
1 Topics in Cyberlaw from an International Perspective / Candeub, Ada.535K / 750 97P6TYJuly 7-23, 2019 9:00am-9:55am11 In Croatia Take Home Exam, P
This course will cover international aspects of cyber law, including problems in international jurisdiction, the Conventional on Cybercrime, the role of ICAAN in internet regulation, and the WIPO Internet Domain Name resolution process. In addition, we will cover several issues in international e-commerce, such as international recognition of valid e-signatures. Students will examine how the unique features of the internet affect both international and national regulatory regimes.
1 Topics in European Private Law and Intellectual Property Law / Kunda, Iva.535M / 750 97P6TZJuly 7-23, 2019 10:00am-10:55am11 In Croatia Take Home Exam, P
This course is intended to provide students with the basic knowledge and general understanding of fundamental concepts in European private law and particularly in European intellectual property law. Where appropriate the course includes comparisons to the US law. In addition, the course aims at identifying specific issues in the field of IP which emerged in the course of Croatian preparation for the accession to the European Union.
1 Topics in International IP / Candeub, Ada. & Cross, Joh.535G / 750 97P6T2July 7-23, 2019 11:00am-11:55am11 In Croatia Take Home Exam, P
This course will examine how international legal regimes affect international property rights on a global basis. The course will cover the major IP regimes: copyright, patent, and trademark. The course will pay special attention to the TRIPS Agreement, how it affects national IP regulation and how it works as an international treaty mechanism. Other topics will include exhaustion of trademarks, different national approaches to the protection of data, and geographical indicators.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Global Food Law - LL.M./M.J.

The following classes are open to students in the Global Food Law Program or with approval of the college. Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu.

Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Biotechnology Law and Food Products / Carter-Johnson, Jef.810P / 730 97P6TGOnline20 Take Home Exam,
This course explores the impact of biotechnology on food production and food safety. After an introduction to biotechnology and the breadth of biotechnology-created foods available, the class will focus on the regulation of food safety and its environmental impact, both in the U.S. and internationally. Students will discuss the impact of public perception on the biotechnology agriculture and transgenic animals industries. No scientific or other class pre-requisites are required.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Law: Preventing Fakes and Counterfeits / Kammel, Kar.810Z / 730 97P6TJOnline May 13-August 15, 201920 Take Home Exam,
Protection from fake food is increasing in importance on a global scale. The crime of product, or trademark, counterfeiting for food has exploded with increased use of e-commerce and it has become even more challenging to protect a company’s food product and brand. While reactive legal responses remain important in the combatting of counterfeit food, a proactive approach will be necessary for a lawyer in this field. This class will explore both the reactive and proactive steps to protect a brand’s food product through trademark law, criminal law, administrative law, and contract law.
2 Foundations of Law and Legal Research / Domann, Bre.807A / 730 97P6TKOnline GFL students only20 Take Home Exam, **
This online course provides an introduction to the American legal system with a special focus on the research and writing needs of international scholars and non-lawyers (focus on American jurisprudence and Global Food Law).
Footnote(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 FSMA FSVP Rule / Card-Abela, Mel.810V / 730 97P6TMOnline May 13-August 15, 2019 GFL students only20 No Exam, **
This course provides students with the legal perspective of FDA’s Foreign Supplier Verification Program of the Food Safety Modernization Act. This course has an administrative overtone, providing an understanding of the legislative and regulatory processes through an in-depth look at the relationship between the Food and Drug Administration, industry, consumer interest groups, and science communities.
Footnote(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Special Topics in Global Food Law / Eicher, All.811B / 730 97P7SYOnline May 3-August 15, 201920 Final Paper,
Designed to explore the rapidly evolving technologies, frequent revisions to the global regulatory landscape, and continually changing consumer demands of food law, this online course focuses on current, emerging and controversial issues. The course emphasizes understanding current issues as well as their long term implications. The impact of these changes are felt along the entire food supply chain and a special focus is given to food production and sourcing as well as the policies impacted.
Prerequisite(s): This course is intended for students in the Global Food Law Program.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR