Spring 2021 Schedule

(Updated: Tuesday, September 28, 2021 12:13 PM)

View schedule sorted by: Course Name, Date Modified, Groupings, Professor

Date key: M-Monday, T-Tuesday, W-Wednesday, R-Thursday, F-Friday

1st Year/Section 1
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Constitutional Law and the Regulatory State / Sant'Ambrogio, Mic.530S / 001 97TGDATR/10:15am-11:55am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 05-06-2021 8:30 AM
This course examines the constitutional, statutory, and administrative foundations of American government. The course has two separate, but interrelated goals: First, to introduce students to the structure of and principles behind the American constitutional order. Topics covered under this heading include the sources of federal regulatory authority, separation of powers, federalism, judicial review and theories of constitutional interpretation. Second, the course offers a basic understanding of the workings of the legislative and regulatory process, with special emphasis on the role of agencies, the policy tools at their disposal, and the scope of legislative and judicial oversight of administrative action. In this fashion this course seeks to highlight the intersection between constitutional and administrative law principles across American history and within contemporary debates.
3 Criminal Law / Avalos, Lis.500F / 001 97TGB5W/11:00am-11:50am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 04-30-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 131) An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
4 Property / Singel, Wen.500G / 001 97TGB8MW/2:00pm-3:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 05-12-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 113) This is a survey course of the fundamentals of property law. Possessory interests of real and personal property including findings, bailments and adverse possession are discussed and analyzed. Topics also include future interests, concurrent ownership, lease holds, transfers of land and land use controls.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year/Section 2
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Constitutional Law and the Regulatory State / Chen, Jam.530S / 002 97TGDBMW/2:00pm-3:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 05-06-2021 1:30 PM
This course examines the constitutional, statutory, and administrative foundations of American government. The course has two separate, but interrelated goals: First, to introduce students to the structure of and principles behind the American constitutional order. Topics covered under this heading include the sources of federal regulatory authority, separation of powers, federalism, judicial review and theories of constitutional interpretation. Second, the course offers a basic understanding of the workings of the legislative and regulatory process, with special emphasis on the role of agencies, the policy tools at their disposal, and the scope of legislative and judicial oversight of administrative action. In this fashion this course seeks to highlight the intersection between constitutional and administrative law principles across American history and within contemporary debates.
3 Criminal Law / O'Brien, Bar.500F / 002 97TGB6TR/9:00am-10:15am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 04-30-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 131) An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
4 Property / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.500G / 002 97TGB9TR/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 05-12-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 113) This is a survey course of the fundamentals of property law. Possessory interests of real and personal property including findings, bailments and adverse possession are discussed and analyzed. Topics also include future interests, concurrent ownership, lease holds, transfers of land and land use controls.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year/Section 3
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Constitutional Law and the Regulatory State / Morag-Levine, Nog.530S / 003 97TGDCMW/10:15am-11:55am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 05-06-2021 8:30 AM
This course examines the constitutional, statutory, and administrative foundations of American government. The course has two separate, but interrelated goals: First, to introduce students to the structure of and principles behind the American constitutional order. Topics covered under this heading include the sources of federal regulatory authority, separation of powers, federalism, judicial review and theories of constitutional interpretation. Second, the course offers a basic understanding of the workings of the legislative and regulatory process, with special emphasis on the role of agencies, the policy tools at their disposal, and the scope of legislative and judicial oversight of administrative action. In this fashion this course seeks to highlight the intersection between constitutional and administrative law principles across American history and within contemporary debates.
3 Criminal Law / O'Brien, Bar.500F / 003 97TGB7TR/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 04-30-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 131) An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
4 Property / Favre, Dav.500G / 003 97TGCAMWR/2:00pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
74 05-12-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 113) This is a survey course of the fundamentals of property law. Possessory interests of real and personal property including findings, bailments and adverse possession are discussed and analyzed. Topics also include future interests, concurrent ownership, lease holds, transfers of land and land use controls.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year Research and Writing
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Advocacy / Lawrence, Dea.530J / 004 97TKB9F/9:00am-10:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
14 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / Stokstad, Pau.530J / 005 97TKCAF/9:00am-10:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
18 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / Stokstad, Pau.530J / 006 97TKCBF/11:00am-12:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
18 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / Costello, Nan.530J / 007 97TKCCF/9:00am-10:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
18 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / Costello, Nan.530J / 008 97TKCDF/11:00am-12:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / O'Regan, Dap.530J / 009 97TKCEF/11:00am-12:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
14 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / O'Regan, Dap.530J / 010 97TKCFF/1:00pm-2:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
14 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / Kirchner, Jes.530J / 011 97TKCGF/10:00am-11:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
14 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / Spiliopoulos, Ela.530J / 012 97TKCHF/10:00am-11:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
14 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / Gentry, Kev.530J / 013 97TKCJF/9:00am-10:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
14 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / LaRose, Ste.530J / 014 97TKCKM/4:00pm-5:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / LaRose, Ste.530J / 015 97TKCMT/3:30pm-5:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
14 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
2 Advocacy / Copland, Jen.530J / 016 97TKCNT/3:30pm-5:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
18 TBD
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Upper Level Required
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Professional Responsibility / Fletcher, Mat.500Q / 001 97TGCKMW/8:45am-10:00am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 Final Paper,
(Formerly DCL 260) A course designed to acquaint the law student with many of the obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives. In addition to a discussion of ethical problems involved in the practice of law, an overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students who have already taken Lawyer Regulation and Ethics in a Technology-Driven World may not take this course.
3 Professional Responsibility / Pucillo, Phi.500Q / 002 97TGCMMW/4:00pm-5:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-07-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 260) A course designed to acquaint the law student with many of the obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives. In addition to a discussion of ethical problems involved in the practice of law, an overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students who have already taken Lawyer Regulation and Ethics in a Technology-Driven World may not take this course.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Electives
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Administrative Law / Staszewski, Gle.532 / 001 97TGDEMW/8:30am-9:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-03-2021 8:30 AM
Formerly DCL 300) This course examines the place of administrative agencies in American government, and surveys the legal rules and principles governing agency regulation, adjudication, investigation, and enforcement; agency structure; and judicial review of agency action. Students who have taken Administrative Law: Food Safety and Labeling (810K) may not take this course
2 Advanced Legal Research / Domann, Bre. & Thompson, Dar.586 / 001 97TGM9R/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, No Exam, E
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
2 Advanced Legal Research / Innes, Tim. & Meland, Jan.586 / 002 97TGNAW/8:30am-10:10am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 No Exam, E
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
2 Advanced Legal Research / Hanna, Hil.586 / 730 97TGNBOnline15 No Exam, E
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
3 Advertising Law-Food Focus / Ekonomon, Ada.810T / 001 97T275Online
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
10 Take Home Exam,
This course covers the regulation of advertising consumer products in the United States with a focus on the advertising of food products. Topics may include the general rules governing advertising, the various types of claims, including claims associated with food and FDA regulated claims, understanding claims vs. puffery, comparative advertising, evaluating the required substantiation required to support various types of claims, environmental marketing claims (“green” claims), the use of endorsements and testimonials, issues in advertising in social media, the right of publicity (use of one’s name and likeness in advertising activities), the regulation of consumer contests and sweepstakes, intellectual property issues in advertising, and some miscellaneous topics such as ambush marketing and native advertising.
Prerequisite(s): This course intended for students in the Global Food Law program
2 Agricultural Law / Deacon, Bra.566N / 301 97TGEPW/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 Final Paper,
Students will learn about the regulatory framework of the food and agriculture sector at the federal, state, and local levels and how the application of this framework impacts all citizens. This includes the production, processing, and distribution of food, fiber, and other products that make up a large portion of the economies of the nation and the State of Michigan. Students will learn about the origins and impacts of these regulatory components and how evolving trends and public opinion are changing the food and agriculture sector
3 American Legal History Seminar / Ten Brink, Cha.636 / 001 97TGH8M/4:00pm-6:30pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 552) This seminar will analyze the tension between the rights of the individual and the role of government in society as the central theme in the development of the American legal system. Rather than a strict chronological review, the course will consist of a series of studies of the development of legal and political institutions and their effect on the citizenry. Classes will be discussion-based and will rely on extensive reading of original sources. Students should gain an understanding of how the evolution of legal rules reflects institutional change, and should learn to see law as a dynamic process rather than a collection of static concepts. Fulfills ULWR
Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I or Constitutional Law and the Regulatory State
3 Animal Law / Favre, Dav.565A / 001 97TGEJMW/4:30pm-5:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 501) A survey of animal legal issues including property status, zoning and criminal anti-cruelty laws. Additionally, legal policy issues will be discussed, such as what to do with dangerous dogs, and what level of animal welfare should be provided to agricultural animals. The distinction between animal welfare and animal rights will be considered.
3 Artificial Intelligence & Law / Barnhizer, Dan.537R / 001 97TGDPTR/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
Artificial Intelligence is experiencing a “golden age” of rapid development. As the use of AI increases, people and computers are knowingly and unknowingly interacting in new ways. Lawyers are confronting computer issues in every practice area. Smart contracts. Autonomous vehicles. Creation and ownership of property. Robot policing and warfare. Interconnected products. Autonomous devices. AI requires updated and new regulations, new ways of practicing, and an understanding of how laws and code interact as a new regulatory system within society. This class will look at how computers are affecting the law and what lawyers should know to provide legal services in this hybrid world.
2 Assisted Reproductive Technologies Seminar / Jacobs, Mel.558N / 001 97TGEHW/4:00pm-5:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 Final Paper, U
This seminar will examine the legal, medical, and ethical issues surrounding assisted reproductive technologies.
3 Bankruptcy / Ponoroff, Law.506A / 001 97TDCZTR/1:30pm-2:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
40 05-07-2021 8:30 AM
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of bankruptcy law, the bankruptcy code, and the creditor/debtor relationship.Students who have taken Consumer Bankruptcy 506E or Chapter 11 Reorganization 506F may not take this course.
1 Bar Exam Success Fundamentals / Pritchard, Gol.604 / 001 97TJ9TR/10:30am-12:10pm 1/14/21 to 2/18/21
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
60 02-25-2021 10:30 AM
This course introduces and reinforces bar examination study and test taking skills. It provides in depth exploration of each part of the bar exam (multiple choice (MBE), essay (MEE) and multi state performance exam (MPT)) and builds students’ skills regarding each part of the exam. This course also devotes time to skills associated with analyzing, studying and memorizing substantive information.
3 Basic Will Drafting / Eagleson, Rob.540A / 302 97TJCXMW/6:00pm-7:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Project, E
(Formerly DCL 391) This course is designed to familiarize students with the interviewing function and the drafting of wills and other basic estate planning vehicles for clients whose estates are not subject to federal estate tax. An evaluation of usable forms and discussion of when and how to use them intelligently will be a focus of the course. A client interview and drafting exercises, including an entire basic estate plan, are contemplated.
Prerequisite(s): Decedents' Estates and Trusts
3 Basic Will Drafting / Behan, Mic.540A / 301 97TGDSTR/6:00pm-7:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, E
(Formerly DCL 391) This course is designed to familiarize students with the interviewing function and the drafting of wills and other basic estate planning vehicles for clients whose estates are not subject to federal estate tax. An evaluation of usable forms and discussion of when and how to use them intelligently will be a focus of the course. A client interview and drafting exercises, including an entire basic estate plan, are contemplated.
Prerequisite(s): Decedents' Estates and Trusts
4 Business Enterprises / Douglas, Kev.500M / 001 97TGCDMWR/4:00pm-5:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-12-2021 1:30 PM
This course deals with issues relating to common forms of business organization, including corporations, limited liability companies and closely held corporations. The four credit version of Business Enterprises also includes an introduction to mergers and acquisitions.
2 Client Counseling and Interviewing / Winegarden, J. .591A / 301 97TKC7W/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Take Home Exam, E
(Formerly DCL 450) This course adopts a client-centered approach in looking at legal problems and examines how to make clients partners in problem solving. Attention is paid to the economic, social and psychological aspects of clients' legal problems. The course starts with an examination of fundamental counseling skills, followed by an analysis of the information gathering process and ultimate decision making. Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence
4 Constitutional Law II / Bitensky, Sus.500N / 001 97TGCGTR/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-07-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 172) A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
4 Constitutional Law II / Kuykendall, Mae.500N / 301 97TGCHTR/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-10-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 172) A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
2 Constitutional Law Seminar / Lawrence, Mic.579C / 001 97TGJ2R/10:15am-11:55am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
This seminar on constitutional theory goes beyond the doctrinal analysis of the topics covered in introductory constitutional law courses to ask deeper normative questions about the United States constitutional system.
2 Contract Drafting / Carter-Johnson, Jen.594A / 003 97THPSM/2:00pm-3:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
14 No Exam, E
The specific purpose of this class is to use contract principles that the student has learned in the first year as a vehicle to develop the student's abilities as a planner and counselor. It will involve the study of some of the common pitfalls encountered in contract drafting and called upon to perform specific exercises in which the student will use her/his basic knowledge of contracts to draft various documents. In the course of the drafting, the student will be required to predict what may happen, provide for that contingency and attempt to protect the client.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts
2 Contract Drafting / VanAntwerp, Mel.594A / 002 97TGR4T/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 No Exam, E
The specific purpose of this class is to use contract principles that the student has learned in the first year as a vehicle to develop the student's abilities as a planner and counselor. It will involve the study of some of the common pitfalls encountered in contract drafting and called upon to perform specific exercises in which the student will use her/his basic knowledge of contracts to draft various documents. In the course of the drafting, the student will be required to predict what may happen, provide for that contingency and attempt to protect the client.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts
2 Contract Drafting / Lawrence, Dea.594A / 001 97TGFGR/10:00am-11:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 No Exam, E
The specific purpose of this class is to use contract principles that the student has learned in the first year as a vehicle to develop the student's abilities as a planner and counselor. It will involve the study of some of the common pitfalls encountered in contract drafting and called upon to perform specific exercises in which the student will use her/his basic knowledge of contracts to draft various documents. In the course of the drafting, the student will be required to predict what may happen, provide for that contingency and attempt to protect the client.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts
3 Corporate Finance / Spoon, Ell.508B / 001 97TGC2MW/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
40 05-11-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 380) In Corporate Finance the principles of accounting and valuation and the basic financial environment of closely held companies and public companies will be examined. Building on this foundation, the fundamental issues surrounding common stock, preferred stock and debt will be analyzed. Finally, all these fundamentals will be applied in examining financial issues with mergers and acquisitions and tender offers and in understanding how "deals" are done. Students who have not taken Business Enterprises are permitted to enroll in this course if they are simultaneously enrolled in Business Enterprises.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
2 Corporate Governance and Compliance / Min, Gee.508F / 001 97TGC4W/2:00pm-3:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper,
(Formerly Corporate Law and Policy: Corporate Governance and Compliance) A survey of issues in corporate governance and compliance in light of the legal risks faced by corporations and corporate directors and officers in the legal environment presented by securities law, antitrust, tort law, environmental law, and other sources of liability. Specific topics include risk management, Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley, internal compliance programs, and corporate codes of conduct and codes of behavior.
3 Corporate Income Taxation / Wease, Jos.508C / 001 97TGC3TR/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 05-03-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 465) The course will focus on federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders, the tax consequences of choice of entity, the formation and liquidations of corporations, the taxation of corporations and shareholders, and the tax aspects of S corporations. EITHER Basic Income Tax A OR Basic Income Tax B fulfills the prerequisite. If the system will not let you register with either of these prerequisites, please contact the Registrar's Office.
Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation
3 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication / Grosso, Cat.616C / 001 97TGFTMW/8:45am-10:00am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-03-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure II) This course examines various issues associated with criminal adjudications with a focus on federal constitutional rights. The course covers issues such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, bail and pretrial detention, discovery, the plea bargaining process, speedy trial rights, federal sentencing guidelines, and post-conviction review. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Criminal Procedure: Investigation in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure II are ineligible to enroll in this course.
3 Criminal Procedure: Investigation / Grosso, Cat.616B / 001 97TGFSMW/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-11-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
2 Criminal Trial Advocacy Post-Conviction Remedies / Scullion, Mar.617C / 001 97TJ9ST/4:00pm-5:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 No Exam, E
(Formerly Criminal Trial Advocacy III Post-Conviction Remedies) This course focuses on the representation issues raised during the critical stage of sentencing. The following topics are covered: duties/function of counsel, statutes, types of sentencing, indeterminate sentencing, length, sentencing plan, credit for time served, concurrent/consecutive, PSIs, considerations, habitual offender, altering sentences, probation, violations, restitution, alternatives, plea bargaining, guilty pleas, Proposal B, good time); sentencing guidelines demonstration; post-conviction motions; criminal appeals; parole; habeas corpus, state and federal; prisoners' rights; and sentencing reform/capital punishment. Criminal Trial Advocacy classes are not sequential and may be taken in any order.
2 Delivering Legal Services: New Legal Landscape / Kennedy, Den.537Q / 001 97TGDNM/4:00pm-5:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 Final Paper,
This course is an introduction to modern legal services delivery. It exposes students to legal data collection and metrics, legal operations, and legal project leadership. We continue with legal supply chain management, pricing legal services, and legal services technologies. Throughout the semester we cover two key areas. We (1) discuss current and emerging legal services ideas (such as how to charge less but earn higher profits from your services), and (2) work on developing legal services skills. This course uses the lean thinking philosophy, the fastest growing method of legal services management. However, no prior experience in lean is required; you will learn what you need in class. Lean thinking includes process mapping and process improvement. We also complete exercises in agile project management and design thinking. Students pursuing traditional legal careers in legal aid, not-for-profit, corporate, government, criminal prosecution or defense, or law firms, will find this course very useful. Students interested in nontraditional legal services careers, such as legal consulting, legal marketing, legal technology, and legal operations, will find it essential. The ideas and skills covered in this course give students an advantage in marketing themselves and in their future careers. This course is a foundation for other courses in the LegalRnD Program, but is not a prerequisite.
3 Domestic Violence / Thronson, Ver.541B / 001 97TGDTMW/4:00pm-5:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
60 05-07-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 427) A historical background of Domestic Violence. Focus will be placed on understanding the nature of domestic violence, the prevention of domestic violence, and the survivor and batterer behavior.
2 Election Law / Fracassi, Ada.579E / 301 97TGERT/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 05-10-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 318) This course involves the study of election issues, including voting; redistricting; candidacy, ballots and ballot access; party organization; initiative, referendum and recall; campaign finance; and recounts.
3 Environmental Law / Morag-Levine, Nog.566A / 001 97TGEMMW/2:00pm-3:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 05-04-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 323) This course provides an introduction to the legal principles, institutions, and policy debates central to American environmental regulation. The course begins with an overview of economical and ethical justifications for environmental regulation, historical and contemporary common-law-based approaches to environmental problems, and the evolution of federal environmental law. Next the course surveys the regulatory programs enacted under major environmental statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The course will focus in this connection on differences in the statutory criteria used to determine the stringency of regulation (risk-based, technology-based, and cost-benefit standards), and the choice between direct regulation and economic-incentive-based means of meeting environmental goals. Finally, discussion will turn to the challenges of environmental enforcement, and the role of agencies, courts and citizens groups in the implementation of environmental law.
3 Evidence / Pucillo, Phi.500P / 001 97TGCJMW/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-11-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 220) A study of the means and methods of proof or disproof of a proposition as either permitted, required or prohibited under the Anglo-American system of jurisprudence. The rules respecting problems of remoteness and prejudice of evidence, circumstantial proof, the employment of writings, their authentication and proof of their contents. A study in depth of hearsay evidence and its status in the evidence. A thorough inquiry into the so-called "evidential preferences" of our legal system and the deficiencies of hearsay evidence as related to these preferences.
3 Family Law: Child, Family and the State / Thronson, Dav.541F / 001 97TGD5TR/3:30pm-4:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-05-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly Family Law II; Child, Family and the State) This course examines a host of issues confronting today's modern families. For example, we will discuss how to define family - including marriage and parenthood - in the 21st century. Some specific topics include: defining family for distribution of "family" benefits; balancing work and family; paternity; domestic violence; child abuse and neglect; surrogacy; adoption; and artificial insemination. Students may take Family Law: Child, Family, and State and Family Law: Marriage & Divorce in any order or at the same time.
2 Gaming Law / Fletcher, Eze.635F / 001 97TJ9RM/2:00pm-3:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 05-04-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly titled Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Indian Gaming Law) This course will introduce students to the unique legal issues that govern Indian gaming activities. Indian Gaming has been the largest economic development tool available to Indian tribal governments over the past 30 years. Today, the Indian gaming industry generates more than $25 billion per year, nationwide. Students in this class will learn about the federal and tribal regulatory structures that govern tribal gaming, the interplay of federal, state, tribal, and local laws in this regulatory structure, the process by which tribes and states negotiate gaming compacts, and the nuanced classification of tribal gaming activities.
2 Health Care Fraud and Abuse / Gulick, P. .558J / 001 97TGEGR/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 05-07-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 594) The course will cover federal and state laws that impose criminal and civil penalties on health care providers for a variety of activities, ranging from payment for referrals to the submissions of false claims. The course would cover the federal and state illegal remuneration statutes, the federal civil monetary penalty and exclusion laws, the federal anti-referral (Stark) law, and the federal false claims laws as they apply to the health care industry.
2 Health Care Law / Geroux, Deb.558C / 001 97TKC6T/10:15am-11:55am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 05-03-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 458) THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS. Survey of major aspects of substantive health care law and regulation. Topics include: 1) Health care economics, including the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, health insurance, Medicare and Medicaid; 2) Health facility regulation, including quality assurance programs, licensing and Medicare-imposed operational requirements; 3) Health professional (practitioner) regulation, including board certification, licensure, medical staff credentialing and corporate practice of medicine; 4) Managed care, including organizational structures, regulation, contracting practices and vicarious liability; 5) Regulation of human subject research; 6) Personal autonomy, surrogate decisionmakers and death and dying; 7) Kickback, Fraud and Abuse and Stark II regulation of referral patterns; 8) Corporate structure and federal tax exemption of health care institutions. Medical malpractice and tort liability will not be emphasized. A final examination is required.
2 Housing Law and the Public Interest / Gilmore, Bri.603B / 001 97TGFMT/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
This is an introductory course that focuses on the significant laws, cases and policies formulated in the 21st century to address housing issues in the United States. The focus is on laws that were a response to economic, racial, and immigration issues and laws and policies designed to provide more access and opportunity to obtain safe, fair, and affordable housing. The course will examine legal and policy areas relating to housing and the problem of providing housing to the population in an effort to bring the issue of a society providing housing for its citizens full circle.
2 Immigration Consequences of Crime / Kloet, Joa.541T / 301 97TGEDW/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper,
This course will examine the immigration consequences of criminal activity through analysis of statutes, regulations, case law, and official federal agency publications. Students will gain the knowledge needed to identify, analyze, and provide advice and counsel with regard to substantive and procedural immigration and naturalization issues that arise from criminal law matters.
3 Immigration Law / Thronson, Dav.541G / 001 97TGEBTR/1:30pm-2:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
60 05-07-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 353) This course provides a general overview of U.S. immigration law and policy. The course will examine the admission, exclusion, deportation and naturalization of noncitizens in the United States, from constitutional foundations to daily practice issues. The course also will explore the rights of immigrants in employment, education, and public benefits, and will analyze the interaction of immigration law with other areas of law such as criminal law.
2 Insurance Law / Golde, Sco.514 / 310 97TGKBT/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 05-10-2021 1:30 PM
Insurance Law addresses (i) the history and function of a variety of types of insurance (including property, life, annuities, directors and officers, and errors and omissions) (ii) issues regarding contract formation (including critical and common elements of an insurance contract), (iii) state, federal and international insurance regulation (focusing on regulation under Michigan law), (iv) reinsurance and other forms of risk transfer, (v) the insurance claims process, and (vi) defense and settlement of insurance claims. If time permits, the course may also address actuarial assumptions, predictive modeling, risk management, and sales and marketing of insurance products.
3 Intellectual Property Survey / Pager, Sea.535D / 001 97TGDJTR/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
40 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 321 and LAW 533V) Formerly known as Intellectual Property Law. This course could be offered for 2 or 3 credits. This course is a survey of all Intellectual Property law, including patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secret law. No technical degree is necessary.
Prerequisite(s): This course is not open to students who have taken 2 of the 3 following courses: Copyright Law, Patent Law, or Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law.
3 International Business Transactions / Barnhizer, Dan.512B / 730 97TGC7Online
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
20 Final Paper,
This course is an introduction to international business transactions. We will explore the following general topics: agreements for the international trading of goods, financing the international sale of goods, establishing and operating a foreign investment, the resolution of international business disputes and enforcement of dispute settlement awards.
2 International Human Rights / Bitensky, Sus.548F / 001 97TGEER/4:00pm-5:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 05-05-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerlty DCL 418) This course explores human rights and the international legal order, background, concepts and the future. It will also consider major international agreements and their relation to local law, and remedies for the implementation of human rights.
2 King Scholars Seminar / Fletcher, Mat.626D / 001 97TGZRArranged
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
2 Final Paper, P U
(Formerly DCL 404) Students who have a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Senior Paper course in their last regular semester at the Law College.
Prerequisite(s): King Scholars Jurisprudence
3 Labor and Employment Law / Bedikian, Mar.511E / 001 97TGC5TR/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
40 05-03-2021 1:30 PM
This is an introductory labor and employment law course, which will initially explore the application of the National Labor Relations Act as amended. Subjects include the jurisdiction, organization and procedures of the National Labor Relations Board; the protection of the right of self-organization; company domination of or assistance to the union; discrimination against employees; remedies for unfair labor practices; unit determinations including micro-units; strikes, boycotts and picketing; judicial review of labor arbitration awards; successorship and the impact of bankruptcy on the duty to bargain; the duty of fair representation; union security agreements/fair share contracts; and, the union’s power to compel concerted activities. The course also will cover foundations of employment law, including an examination of the employment relationship and terms and conditions of employment. A substantial portion of the course will cover federal legislation and related case law, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).
Prerequisite(s): Students may not take this course if they have taken Labor Law or Employment Law.
3 Land Use Planning / Ten Brink, Cha.566B / 001 97TGENMW/2:00pm-3:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
45 05-04-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 401) THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS. Explores the principal methods of local government control of land use, with special emphasis on the theory and practice of zoning and eminent domain. Analyzes judicial response, through the use of nuisance and "takings" doctrines, to local land use planning efforts.
Prerequisite(s): Property
2 Law and Gender / Costello, Nan.541N / 301 97T284R/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
7 Final Paper, U
This course will focus on Sex, Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and the Law. The seminar will explore privacy, the regulation of sexual activity, marriage, religious exemptions, employment discrimination, education, and legal theory. Students will be encouraged to examine law and sexuality in the context of constitutional and statutory protections and limitations that could inform multiple areas of study or work on behalf of LGBTQ clients in the future. This semester long course meets once per week and will require regular class participation, an oral argument, and a final paper or appellate brief.
2 Law and Interpretation / Ravitch, Fra.579R / 001 97TH5NM/4:00pm-5:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 Take Home Exam,
This course will explore the ways in which judges and other legal actors interpret the law. Anyone who has studied law for even a short period of time quickly becomes aware that there are a variety of legal and jurisprudential tools that judges can use in interpreting the law. In this course we will explore the various tools judges use in interpreting cases, as well as a number of the theoretical schools that influence or help us understand judicial decision-making. We will do this by analyzing cases and by studying the various tools/theories relevant to legal interpretation. The course will cover legal interpretation in the contexts of constitutional, statutory, and common law. The hope is to look underneath the cases and try to understand how great legal minds (judges, lawyers, and scholars) can look at the same or similar facts and law, yet reach significantly varied interpretative results.
3 Law and Religion / Ravitch, Fra.579K / 001 97TGFCMW/2:00pm-3:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 05-04-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 530) This course will focus on church/state law -- the legal doctrines that have arisen in cases under the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. The course will explore the role of law in various religious traditions and the role of religion in law and public discourse. Topics addressed include school prayer, government aid to religious institutions (including school vouchers and charitable choice), government endorsement of religious symbols, the role of public forum doctrine in religion cases, freedom of religious expression, and the freedom to practice one's religion.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Wease, Chr.625D / 732 97T3CSOnline
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
1 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Wease, Chr.625D / 733 97T3KN
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
10 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Liggins, Jam.625D / 731 97TGKMOnline
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
4 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Wease, Chr.625D / 730 97TGKKonline
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
15 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
2 Legal Issues with Energy Development and Wildlife / Frampton, Car.565C / 001 97TGEKM/8:00am-9:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper,
This course will explore emerging issues in energy law and policy that relate to fish and wildlife. The class is responsible for publishing The Wildlife Law Call, a newsletter on current case law and articles pertinent to energy development and wildlife issues. Students are graded on their individual contribution to this publication.
3 Legislation / Staszewski, Gle.579P / 001 97TGFDMW/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
40 05-11-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 329) This course starts with the premise that understanding the legislative process is important for sophisticated legal analysis in an age of legislation. The course therefore studies different theories of the legislative process, as well as the accompanying doctrines and theories of statutory interpretation. It also examines structures of representative democracy and deliberative decision making, including the principle of "one person, one vote," reapportionment of legislative districts, term limits, the line-item veto, and regulations of campaign finance. Finally, the course considers the use of direct democracy as an alternative to republican government and examines the role of administrative agencies in the implementation and interpretation of statutes. By the end of the semester, students will have a greater understanding of the various public law institutions in the United States, their relationships to one another, and how this knowledge can be used to construct persuasive arguments regarding the application of positive law to particular legal problems.
3 Licensing Intellectual Property / Carter-Johnson, Jef.533F / 001 97TGDFMW/10:30am-11:45am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 05-11-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 516) The class focuses on managing an intellectual property portfolio to maximize a client's return on investment in intellectual property assets. Unlike other intellectual property courses that focus on obtaining intellectual property rights, the scope of those rights, and the remedies for infringing, this course emphasizes the identification, valuation, and management of intellectual property assets both as a source of revenue and as part of a larger offensive or defensive litigation strategy. Topics covered also include intellectual property assets, management, and licensing in the context of tax and antitrust law. Students will be required to draft part of a license agreement or agreement to transfer ownership of an intellectual property asset. Time permitting, this course will also cover cross-border intellectual property transactions. At the conclusion of this course, a student should appreciate the role of intellectual property as part of creation and management of a larger enterprise.
3 Mortgage Finance / Spoon, Ell.517A / 001 97TGC9MW/2:00pm-3:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
40 05-04-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly Mortgage Banking Law) This course will explore in depth the various legal issues in the mortgage banking industry, a trillion dollar industry at the heart of the U.S. economy. The focus will be primarily on the residential mortgage segment, as that is the larger and more familiar part of the industry. (Formerly DCL 466) The course will examine the "life" of a residential mortgage loan, including its origination between a consumer and a mortgage lender, on the one hand, and its metamorphosis into part of the international capital market, on the other. More particularly, the course will involve analysis of the uniform note and mortgage; examination of non-conventional types of residential finance; survey of applicable federal laws and regulations (including Truth-in-Lending, Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, Equal Credit Opportunity Act, etc.); review of agreements used in the origination and sale of residential mortgage loans; and consideration of the mechanics of securitization of mortgage loans. This will be an interdisciplinary course where students will be able to use concepts of real estate law, consumer law, commercial transactions and securities law.
2 Negotiation / Raheem, Ant.591C / 002 97TGFFR/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 Final Paper, E
(Formerly DCL 520) This course introduces principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in multiple mock negotiations, with frequent feedback from the instructor.
2 Negotiation / Basta, Jos.591C / 001 97TGFET/10:00am-11:40am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 Take Home Exam, E
(Formerly DCL 520) This course introduces principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in multiple mock negotiations, with frequent feedback from the instructor.
2 No-Fault Insurance Law / Sinas, Ste. & Waldman, Bry.595 / 301 97TGFJW/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 05-10-2021 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 319) This course will provide an in-depth look at Michigan's version of the no-fault concept. Statutory and case precedent dealing with such issues as coverage, first-party benefits and limits on recovery will be explored. Also, the policy behind and practical application of the no-fault "threshold" will be studied.
2 Partnership Taxation / Stelter, All.519 / 001 97TKC8T/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 316) Through the use of the problem-solving method, this course will focus on the tax issues associated with the formation, operation, termination and liquidation of partnerships, as well as the sale of partnership interests, related party transactions and classification problems. EITHER Basic Income Tax A OR Basic Income Tax B, along with EITHER Business Enterprises OR Agency and Partnership, fulfills the prerequesite. Recommended but not required: Business Income Taxation or Corporate Income Taxation
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
3 Payment Systems / Alsup, Con.501G / 001 97TGCXTR/1:30pm-2:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 05-07-2021 8:30 AM
“This course, which is a subject tested on Bar Exams, deals with negotiable instruments pursuant to Article 3 of the UCC along with bank deposits and collections under Article 4, electronic funds transfers under Article 4A and letters of credit under Article 5, all being matters with which attorneys are regularly concerned. Included in the curricula are the related federal regulations, clearing house rules and permissible credit card transactions. The course alerts the student to the proper use, care and pitfalls attendant to negotiable instruments and will include teaching professional and practical aspects of recognizing them, how they are created and how they must be handled so as to avoid losses and liabilities. There is no prerequisite course.”
3 Problem-solving Approaches to Conflict Resolution / Bedikian, Mar.505C / 001 97TGCYTR/3:30pm-4:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 05-05-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 553) (Formerly ADR Survey) This interactive course will cover the following topics: critical perspectives of ADR, negotiations (strategies, positioning for influence, and truthfulness), mediation (structuring enforceable agreements to mediate, confidentiality, mediator liability, and professional responsibility issues in mediation), third party evaluation and fact-finding, settlement perspectives, including the use of class actions, arbitration (preemption, enforceability of agreements to arbitrate, defenses to arbitration, due process, remedies and judicial review, judicial immunity), and alternative dispute resolution in state and federal courts. Teaching modalities will include lecture, simulations, video and exercises, along with selected book readings. 
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I
2 Rethinking Intellectual Property in a Technological Age / Pager, Sea.535R / 001 97THPTT/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
A selected topics seminar that considers how intellectual property law (with an emphasis on copyright and trademark) might respond to changing technologies and new models of cultural production.
Prerequisite(s): Past or current enrollment in one or more intellectual property course is recommended.
3 Sales and Leases / Reifenberg, Jr., Joh.501F / 001 97TGCWTR/3:30pm-4:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
40 05-05-2021 8:30 AM
This course examines the information and terms, as well as remedies for breach, of contracts for sales of goods, under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). The course also examines Article 2A's provisions on leases and provides an overview of the similarities and differences between Article 2 of the UCC and the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods. Other topics that the course may cover include documents of title under Article 7 of the UCC, Magnuson Moss Warranty Act, or the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA). The class is not open to students who already have taken Commercial Transactions Survey (LAW 501M), or the 4-credit hour Sales and Secured Transactions class.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts. Students who have taken Commercial Transactions Survey or 4-cr. Sales and Secured Transactions may not take this class.
3 Secured Transactions / Ponoroff, Law.501E / 001 97TGCVTR/9:00am-10:15am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 04-30-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 240) Covers the process of financing the sale of goods, the secured transaction under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, including creation, perfection, priority of security interests in personal property and default procedures.
Prerequisite(s): Students who have taken Sales and Secured Transactions may not take this class.
2 Seminar in Race, Law and American Culture: From Slavery to Post Civil Rights / Kuykendall, Mae.541S / 001 97TGECR/1:30pm-3:10pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
This course examines race history in the United States, with primary reference to the culture and the law affecting African-Americans from slavery to post-Civil Rights. The objective of the course is to provide insight of the evolution of legal doctrine relating to race, examining and critically analyzing continuities and discontinuities; and equip students with the ability to debate, as lawyers and public citizens, the contemporary issues in race relations, with reference to the history of all racial and ethnic minorities and the complications of increasing diversity in racial, ethnic, and cultural traditions in the U.S.
2 Sports Law / Schneider, Deb.609 / 301 97TGFNW/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper,
(Formerly DCL 351) This course explores the legal structure of and problems surrounding amateur and professional sports leagues and associations. Included will be an examination of the role of the collective bargaining process, representation of the professional athlete, individual contracts and arbitration in professional sports, anti-trust law implications and common problem areas, including the particular place of tort and criminal law in professional and amateur sports. 
3 The Law of American Chattel Slavery: Origins and Development / Simard, Jus.541Y / 001 97TGJZMW/2:00pm-3:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
Law played a critical role in creating and perpetuating American chattel slavery. This course examines the origins, development, and legacy of the laws that built and sustained a slave society. It will explore the legal efforts that slaveowners made to protect their property and the role of judges and lawyers in treating people as property. This class will also examine resistance to slavery through the legal system, following abolitionists, politicians, and enslaved people as they attempted to make a legal case for freedom. The historical law of slavery will be placed into context in light of its continued relevance for American law.
3 Trademark Counterfeiting / Kammel, Kar.533Y / 001 97TGFBTR/3:30pm-4:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
30 Project,
Trademark counterfeiting is currently one of the most lucrative transnational crimes, with revenue surpassing the illegal drug and weapons trade. The importance in combatting it is becoming increasingly important to industry, the legal community, law enforcement, and government. Trademark counterfeiting has exploded with increased use of e-commerce and continuing globalization of the supply chain and it has become even more challenging to protect a company’s product and brand. Above all, the law, in the US and abroad, is the main basis for keeping this phenomenon at bay. Without incentive for companies to protect their consumers, governments to protect their citizens, and the legitimate business to prevent illicit trade, consumers worldwide can be injured or even die from counterfeits. Additionally, proceeds from the trafficking and sale are linked to organize crimes, narcotrafficking, slave-like labor practices and in some cases terrorism. Both reactive and proactive legal responses will be explored in this class through trademark law, criminal law, and contract law.
Prerequisite(s): Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law OR Intellectual Property Survey
3 Trial Practice Institute – Scientific Evidence & Legal Technology / Payok, Mat.623N / 301 97TGKGR/6:00pm-8:30pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
32 Oral Exam,
Scientific Evidence & Legal Technology reviews the maximization of technology in the delivery of legal services. This course requires students to develop a competence in the use of experts during litigation, the e-discovery process, and new legal delivery methods.
Prerequisite(s): Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
2 Trial Practice Institute – Trial Presentation / Swartzle, Bro.623M / 301 97TGKFR/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
35 Oral Exam,
This course reviews the efficient use of courtroom technology and the presentation of electronic evidence, effective verbal and nonverbal communication skills, and proper courtroom etiquette and decorum during the various stages of litigation.
Prerequisite(s): Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
2 Trial Practice Institute-Pretrial II / Sherman, Ann.623C / 301 97TGKDM/6:00pm-7:40pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 No Exam, E
(Formerly DCL 513) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Pretrial II focuses on the fundamental approaches of persuasion, elements of advocacy and methods of effective presentation. The class is divided into four teams of four people which are then assigned depositions of witnesses in a problem with fact, lay and expert witnesses. At the conclusion of the deposition phase of the problem, motions in limine are prepared and argued by each team. Additionally, a facilitative mediation brief is prepared by all teams and argued. At the conclusion of the class, opening statements are prepared and presented by each one of the teams. The students will be prepared at the end of the course for the elements of the Trial I course that will commence in the second year of the program. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
2 Trial Practice Institute-Pretrial II / McNally, Ver.623C / 001 97TGKET/10:15am-11:55am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 No Exam, E
(Formerly DCL 513) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Pretrial II focuses on the fundamental approaches of persuasion, elements of advocacy and methods of effective presentation. The class is divided into four teams of four people which are then assigned depositions of witnesses in a problem with fact, lay and expert witnesses. At the conclusion of the deposition phase of the problem, motions in limine are prepared and argued by each team. Additionally, a facilitative mediation brief is prepared by all teams and argued. At the conclusion of the class, opening statements are prepared and presented by each one of the teams. The students will be prepared at the end of the course for the elements of the Trial I course that will commence in the second year of the program. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
3 Trial Practice Institute-Trial II / Farah, Jos.623E / 302 97TGKJT/6:00pm-8:30pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 E
(Formerly DCL 542 and DCL 565, Formerly Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIA and Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIB ) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. This course caps the trial training program at Michigan State University-DCL College of Law. The purpose of the course is to provide graduating seniors with the opportunity to use the skills and education they have received to handle a complete criminal case, from their initial interview with the client (or making the charging decision based upon a law enforcement investigation and request for warrant). This program is unique in that the defendant, law enforcement witnesses, civilian witnesses, and expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University, Department of Theatre. The expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University Medical School. The objective for all students involved is to have hands on experience related to their particular college and curriculum at Michigan State University. Law students will have an opportunity to take a criminal case from start to finish, investigating the facts of the case, preparing for all aspects of the case through the development of the theory of the case, interviewing witnesses, conducting the preliminary examination, motion practice and culminating with the trial itself. The goal is to provide an opportunity to put into practice what students have learned over their law school career at MSU College of Law. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
3 Trial Practice Institute-Trial II / Abouzeid, Had.623E / 301 97TGKHW/6:00pm-8:30pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
16 E
(Formerly DCL 542 and DCL 565, Formerly Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIA and Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIB ) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. This course caps the trial training program at Michigan State University-DCL College of Law. The purpose of the course is to provide graduating seniors with the opportunity to use the skills and education they have received to handle a complete criminal case, from their initial interview with the client (or making the charging decision based upon a law enforcement investigation and request for warrant). This program is unique in that the defendant, law enforcement witnesses, civilian witnesses, and expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University, Department of Theatre. The expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University Medical School. The objective for all students involved is to have hands on experience related to their particular college and curriculum at Michigan State University. Law students will have an opportunity to take a criminal case from start to finish, investigating the facts of the case, preparing for all aspects of the case through the development of the theory of the case, interviewing witnesses, conducting the preliminary examination, motion practice and culminating with the trial itself. The goal is to provide an opportunity to put into practice what students have learned over their law school career at MSU College of Law. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
3 Tribal Law / Fletcher, Mat.635E / 001 97TGF6TR/8:45am-10:00am
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
20 Final Paper, U
(This course replaces Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Tribal Law) A survey of the laws that tribes enact to govern themselves. It considers issues ranging from governance (elections, justice systems, and tribal constitutions), to conflicts between individuals (contracts, property, domestic relations, torts), to regulation of a tribal community's economy.
3 Trusts and Estates / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.501D / 001 97TGCUMW/2:00pm-3:15pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
80 05-06-2021 1:30 PM
(Formerly Decedents' Estates and Trusts) A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
3 Workers' Compensation / Bruce-Erickson, Car.610 / 001 97TGFPTR/3:30pm-4:45pm
Online/Remote – Synchronous instruction requires online interaction at scheduled days/times.
24 05-05-2021 8:30 AM
This course approaches workers’ compensation from a national perspective, exposing students to the varied laws across the country while focusing on the common principles of this area of law in all states. With its “no fault” status, workers’ disability compensation is a unique type of law which impacts businesses and most workers in the United States. The Michigan Workers’ Disability Compensation Act is used as the model law for the class and several important Michigan cases are included as additional course materials.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Miscellaneous
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q / 001 97TGFUArranged
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
0 No Exam, E P
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
1 Negotiation Competition / Bedikian, Mar.627N / 001 97TJ4FArranged
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
0 No Exam, E P
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school's Negotiation Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of negotiation with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy, and Contract Negotiation Permission Only
Var Trial Competition / McNally, Ver.627R / 001 97TGKRArranged
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
0 No Exam, E P
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Mock Trial Team. The course covers the mechanics of trial practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Clinics
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Chance at Childhood Clinic I / Kozakiewicz, Jos.631F / 001 97TGF4W/9:00am-11:30am
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
The Clinic provides a setting for law and social work students to gain experience in child advocacy. The Clinic provides a forum for advocating for children, both in individual cases and through seeking to affect public policy and practice within the state of Michigan. Student teams will serve in a variety of roles to effectively advocate for children.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspective and Advocacy
3 Chance at Childhood Clinic II / Kozakiewicz, Jos.631G / 001 97T2ZAArranged
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
A continuation of Chance at Childhood Clinic I.
Prerequisite(s): Chance at Childhood Clinic I
4 Civil Rights Clinic I / Manville, Dan.630X / 001 97TGF3TR/3:30pm-5:10pm
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
Students will receive a versatile and well-rounded education in the intricacies of civil rights law and hone client management, case management, negotiation, and trial skills. Students will use their knowledge and skills to litigate civil rights cases in federal District Court (WD, MI) for their clients, prisoners who are incarcerated in Michigan and have asserted claims about the conditions of their confinement. Under the supervision of clinic faculty, students will represent their clients at all stages of these cases, including case development and strategy, discovery, motion practice, and trial. In addition to class times, students enrolled in this clinical program must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week NOTE: (1) Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for the application deadline). Preference will be given to students who commit to participate in the clinic for two semesters. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisite(s): All student clinicians enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic I must have successfully completed RWA and Advocacy. In addition, they must have successfully completed the first year (six credits) of the Law Colleges TPI program or must have successfully completed at least six credits in Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Rights Seminar, Complex Civil Litigation, or Constitutional Law II.
Var Civil Rights Clinic II / Manville, Dan.630Z / 001 97TGP8Arranged
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
This is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Civil Rights Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling clients, managing a caseload, and litigating civil rights cases on their clients’ behalf in federal District Court. Typically, students who are enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic II assume a more in-depth role in their clients’ litigation. As in Civil Rights Clinic I, students further their experience under the supervision of clinic faculty and enhance their knowledge of civil rights law and trial practice. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12 to15 hours weekly). NOTE: (1) Enrollment in Civil Rights Clinic II is by invitation only. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Rights Clinic I
Var Housing Law Clinic I / Gilmore, Bri.630V / 001 97TGF2Arranged
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic I - LAW 630A) Housing Law Clinic I is a comprehensive housing clinic that will cover a variety of housing areas for students. Students will have the opportunity to master the basics of local landlord-tenant law, and to focus on how the clinic can best serve the community in the housing area based upon the overall needs of the community and the problems facing consumers with respect to their housing choices. Other areas of clinic development and student advocacy will entail, but will not be limited to, foreclosures, fair housing, affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness. Students can be expected to be assigned actual clients with housing problems and will, with supervision, act as legal counsel for these clients in a variety of settings. This will include advocacy in local housing courts and judicial tribunals in the state of Michigan. However, students will be mainly trained to be advocates, in and out of a judicial setting, with the overall goal to provide the student with a more expansive and well-rounded experience regarding housing law in a legal education setting. Students also will have the opportunity to consider other areas of housing advocacy where they might be able to have an impact on the lives of consumers, and will be supervised and supported in pursuing these goals on behalf of consumers. Enrollment in Housing Law Clinic I is by application only. Details about the application process will be provided to students in advance of each semester's enrollment period. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student works between 12-15 hours weekly in addition to instructional time). NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory orientation session that will likely take place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II,Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy
4 Housing Law Clinic II / Gilmore, Bri.630W / 001 97TGP9Arranged
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic II - LAW 630B) Housing Law Clinic II provides an opportunity for students, upon approval of the supervising faculty, to continue work Housing Law Clinic. The selected students will be expected to provide support and work more independently than students enrolled in Housing Law Clinic I. Expectations are high and ongoing projects and cases that these students are engaged in will be a core responsibility.
Prerequisite(s): Housing Law Clinic I, Rental Housing Clinic I
6 Immigration Law Clinic I / Thronson, Ver.630R / 001 97TGFZF/10:00am-12:00pm
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
Students engage with immigrant communities through direct client representation and systemic advocacy. The Immigration Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to experience the practice of law in a well-supervised and academically rigorous program that both prepares them for the practice of law and enables them to critically assess social justice issues. In addition to client representation and advocacy, students participate in a clinic seminar. Students are required to work an average of 20 hours per week. Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for details of application process).
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II or Research, Writing & Analysis, Advocacy
3 Immigration Law Clinic II / Thronson, Ver.630S / 001 97TGRAArranged
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
A supplement to Immigration Law Clinic I, open to students who have successfully completed Immigration Law Clinic I, and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Students work on a clinic-based project developed in consultation with the professor. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of one to three credits. Prerequisite(s): Immigration Law Clinic I
Prerequisite(s): Immigration Law Clinic I
3 Indian Law Clinic I / Fort, Kat.631J / 001 97TGF5TR/8:30am-10:10am
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
This course provides students with the opportunity to work the environment of a small law firm dedicated to the practice of indigenous law. Students in the Clinic conduct legal research and write briefs for appellate cases, research legal matters for tribes, and develop policy papers for tribal governments and organizations.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis Advocacy
3 Indian Law Clinic II / Fort, Kat.631K / 001 97TGRBArranged
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
A continuation of Indian Law Clinic I.
Prerequisite(s): Indian Law Clinic I or Indigenous Law and Policy Center I
6 Tax Clinic I / Wease, Jos.630C / 001 97TGFYMW/2:00pm-3:40pm
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
(Formerly DCL 476) Students enrolled in Tax Clinic I become "client ready" by representing clients with respect to a broad range of federal, state, and local tax controversies. Students advocate for their clients by working through a variety of administrative determinations, as well as by routinely participating in collection due process and Appeals hearings before the Internal Revenue Service and informal conferences before the Michigan Department of Treasury. In addition, they litigate cases in the United States Tax Court, the Michigan Tax Tribunal, the United States District Courts, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and Michigan appellate courts. Students also counsel ESL taxpayers about their rights and responsibilities under the Internal Revenue Code, and engage in numerous outreaches designed to educate the public about tax issues and requirements. All work takes place under the guidance and close supervision of experienced clinical faculty. Class sessions focus not only on substantive tax issues, but also on professional development, ethical considerations, policy matters, and client and case management. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours - in addition to class time - during the semester, and are expected to participate in a one-day orientati1n scheduled before the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisite(s): For students admitted before Fall 2011, Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II; for students admitted in Fall 2011 and later, Research, Writing & Analysis and Advocacy.
4 Tax Clinic II / Wease, Jos.630D / 001 97TGRCArranged
Online/Remote/In-person Hybrid – Instruction occurs online/remote with in-person sessions of students in a rotation at scheduled days/times.
0 No Exam, E P
(Formerly DCL 515) Tax Clinic II is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Tax Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling and representing clients, to take on more complex assignments, and to assist in mentoring Tax Clinic I students. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours during the semester.
Prerequisite(s): Tax Clinic I
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Journals
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Animal and Natural Resources Law Review / Favre, Dav.629C / 001 97TGFWArranged
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
0 Final Paper, P U
The Journal of Animal Law was the second legal journal established in North America specializing in animal law and is currently one of only three existing that is dedicated to the specialized topic of animal law. The Journal of Animal Law has been able to welcome editors from other ABA-accredited law schools in addition to MSU College of Law. The goals of the Journal of Animal Law are: -To provide volumes of legal policy materials that relate to animal law and animal welfare. -To provide expert explanation of the materials for both legal and non-legal audiences. -To be an education resource for both the lawyer and the non-lawyer. -To provide historical perspective about social and legal attitudes toward animals, and how we as a society have arrived at its present perspective. Students must satisfy the following criteria to receive Journal credit: (1) two year participation on the Journal staff/board; (2)editing and cite-checking of papers submitted to the Journal; (3)satisfy editing obligation during the first-year on Journal staff; (4)election to Journal board for final year at the Law College; and (5) fulfill leadership obligations of Board position.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
Var International Law Review / Lawrence, Mic.629A / 001 97TGKUArranged
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
0 Final Paper, P U
(Formerly Journal of International Law) Participation by writing competition upon satisfactory completion by day students of two full semesters and by evening students of three full semesters. Two credits of ungraded credit earned upon completion of a student article, a comment, required production work and participation in the organization of the International Law Symposium and the International Achievement Award Dinner.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
Var Law Review / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.628 / 001 97TGFVArranged
Online/Remote – Asynchronous instruction requires online interaction with flexible time.
0 Final Paper, P U
Participation is by invitation or writing competition upon satisfactory completion by full-time students of two full semesters and by part-time students of three full semesters. Four semester hours of ungraded credit earned upon successful completion of a casenote, a comment and all required production work.
Prerequisite(s): Credits completed and GPA
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Global Food Law - LL.M./M.J.

The following classes are open to students in the Global Food Law Program or with approval of the college. Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu.

Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Advertising Law-Food Focus / Ekonomon, Ada.810T / 730 97THDVOnline GFL students only20 Take Home Exam,
This course covers the regulation of advertising consumer products in the United States with a focus on the advertising of food products. Topics may include the general rules governing advertising, the various types of claims, including claims associated with food and FDA regulated claims, understanding claims vs. puffery, comparative advertising, evaluating the required substantiation required to support various types of claims, environmental marketing claims (“green” claims), the use of endorsements and testimonials, issues in advertising in social media, the right of publicity (use of one’s name and likeness in advertising activities), the regulation of consumer contests and sweepstakes, intellectual property issues in advertising, and some miscellaneous topics such as ambush marketing and native advertising.
Prerequisite(s): This course intended for students in the Global Food Law program
3 Food Regulation in Canada / Deangelo, Kri.810C / 730 97THDSOnline GFL students only15 Take Home Exam,
This course is designed for anyone who must understand the legal and regulatory complexities of the flow of food and agricultural products as they make their way from the farm gate to the grocery store shelves in Canada. This course will examine federal statutes and regulations including the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labeling Act, the Fish Inspection Act and the Meat Inspection Act.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in the U.S. / Fortin, Nea.810A / 730 97THDROnline GFL students only20 Take Home Exam,
An online course designed for anyone who must understand the legal and regulatory complexities of the regulation of food products in the United States including issues such as food and food safety regulation, regulatory compliance, HACCP, the regulation of genetic modifications, food additive regulation, food labeling, dietary supplements, the protection of the food supply, and the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
2 Foundations of Law and Legal Research / Domann, Bre.807A / 730 97THDPOnline GFL students only20 Take Home Exam,
This online course provides an introduction to the American legal system with a special focus on the research and writing needs of international scholars and non-lawyers (focus on American jurisprudence and Global Food Law).
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 FSMA Preventive Controls Rule / Haskell, Sco.810W / 730 97THDXOnline GFL students only20 TBD
This course provides students with the legal perspective of FDA’s Preventive Controls for Human Food Rule of the Food Safety Modernization Act. This course has an administrative overtone, providing an understanding of the legislative and regulatory processes through an in-depth look at the relationship between the Food and Drug Administration, industry, consumer interest groups, and science communities.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 International Business Transactions / Barnhizer, Dan.512B / 731 97THECOnline GFL students only10 Take Home Exam,
This course is an introduction to international business transactions. We will explore the following general topics: agreements for the international trading of goods, financing the international sale of goods, establishing and operating a foreign investment, the resolution of international business disputes and enforcement of dispute settlement awards.
3 International Food Laws and Regulations / Fortin, Nea.810D / 730 97THDTOnline GFL students only20 Take Home Exam,
The objective of this online course is to provide the student with an overview of the systems of food regulation practiced in different regions of the world including some of the cultural and social-economic factors which influence the regulation of food products in the specific region including issues such as genetic modification, importation, exportation, food additives, and regulatory compliance.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 International Food Standards — WHO and FAO / Fortin, Nea.810F / 730 97THDUOnline GFL students only20 Take Home Exam,
(Previously titled Codex Alimentarius)This course is to familiarize students with the history, development and workings of the Codex Alimentarius Commission in formulating and harmonizing food standards and ensuring their global implementation. This course will focus both on the content of the Codex Alimentarius and on legal application of the Codex Alimentarius.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Regulatory Leadership in Food Law / Fortin, Nea.810U / 730 97THDWOnline GFL students only20 TBD
In the modern regulatory state, the attorney or regulatory affairs manager is looked to for counsel on more than just the meaning of black letter law, but also for guidance and leadership in dealing with agencies, particularly in adverse or high-stakes situations. This course will provide students with an introduction to regulatory affairs through the regulation of food. Among other concepts, this course will cover: the nature of the regulatory process; the role of regulatory affairs; the practical application of regulatory affairs; tools and strategies concerning regulatory affairs; the nature of assessing and communicating risk; quality controls and management; compliance; and judicial review of agency decisions.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR