Fall 2018 Schedule

(Updated: Thursday, January 10, 2019 2:21 PM)

View schedule sorted by: Course Name, Date Modified, Groupings, Professor

Date key: M-Monday, T-Tuesday, W-Wednesday, R-Thursday, F-Friday

1st Year/Section 1
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Civil Procedure / Darden, Tif.530A / 001 97MR5XTR/10:30AM-12:10PM75 471 12-19-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly Civil Procedure I) A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.
4 Contracts / Ponoroff, Law.530B / 001 97MR6AMWF/8:30AM-9:45AM75 473 12-14-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E) A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.
0 Foundations of Law / Fletcher, Mat.530K / 001 97MR6XIMMERSION WEEK75 471 TBD
The primary focus of this course is to provide first-year students with an introduction to the study of law, with preliminary exposure to legal reasoning, the structure of the American legal system, and fundamental legal-theoretical concepts. This course also seeks to put students who come to the law from a variety of academic backgrounds on a more equal footing.
4 Torts I / Ravitch, Fra.500R / 001 97MR84MW/2:15PM-3:55PM75 473 12-10-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCl 141) The study of the protection that the law affords against interference by others with one's person, property or intangible interest. It is broadly divisible into three areas of liability: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. Specific tort actions and defenses are analyzed. Each is examined in the context of underlying social and economic factors that provide the framework in which law develops and social conflict is managed.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year/Section 2
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Civil Procedure / Sant'Ambrogio, Mic.530A / 002 97MR5YTR/10:30AM-12:10PM75 472 12-19-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly Civil Procedure I) A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.
4 Contracts / Spoon, Ell.530B / 002 97MR6BMW/10:00AM-11:40AM75 473 12-14-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E) A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.
0 Foundations of Law / Grosso, Cat.530K / 002 97MR6YIMMERSION WEEK75 472 TBD
The primary focus of this course is to provide first-year students with an introduction to the study of law, with preliminary exposure to legal reasoning, the structure of the American legal system, and fundamental legal-theoretical concepts. This course also seeks to put students who come to the law from a variety of academic backgrounds on a more equal footing.
4 Torts I / Ravitch, Fra.500R / 002 97MR85MW/4:15PM-5:55PM75 473 12-10-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCl 141) The study of the protection that the law affords against interference by others with one's person, property or intangible interest. It is broadly divisible into three areas of liability: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. Specific tort actions and defenses are analyzed. Each is examined in the context of underlying social and economic factors that provide the framework in which law develops and social conflict is managed.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year/Section 3
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Civil Procedure / Staszewski, Gle.530A / 003 97MR5ZMW/8:30AM-10:10AM75 472 12-19-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly Civil Procedure I) A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.
4 Contracts / Lawton, Ann.530B / 003 97MR6CTR/8:30AM-10:10AM75 473 12-14-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E) A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.
0 Foundations of Law / O'Brien, Bar.530K / 003 97MR6ZIMMERSION WEEK75 473 TBD
The primary focus of this course is to provide first-year students with an introduction to the study of law, with preliminary exposure to legal reasoning, the structure of the American legal system, and fundamental legal-theoretical concepts. This course also seeks to put students who come to the law from a variety of academic backgrounds on a more equal footing.
4 Torts I / Kalt, Bri.500R / 003 97MR86MW/2:15PM-4:00PM75 472 12-10-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCl 141) The study of the protection that the law affords against interference by others with one's person, property or intangible interest. It is broadly divisible into three areas of liability: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. Specific tort actions and defenses are analyzed. Each is examined in the context of underlying social and economic factors that provide the framework in which law develops and social conflict is managed.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year Research and Writing
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Spiliopoulos, Ela.530D / 004 97MWYCW/2:30pm-3:20pm F/9:00am-10:40am Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 11:00am14 W/324 F/340
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter. Additional $200 for lab fee will be assessed.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Gentry, Kev.530D / 005 97MWYDW/11:00am-11:50am F/11:00am-12:40pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 1:30pm14 W/335 F/341
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter. Additional $200 for lab fee will be assessed.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Gentry, Kev.530D / 006 97MWYEW/9:00am-9:50am F/9:00am-10:40am Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 11:00am14 341
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter. Additional $200 for lab fee will be assessed.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Lawrence, Dea.530D / 007 97MWYFT/8:30am-9:20am R/8:30am-10:10am Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 11:00am14 325
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter. Additional $200 for lab fee will be assessed.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Stokstad, Pau.530D / 008 97MWYGT/8:30am-9:20am R/8:30am-10:10am Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 11:00am18 340
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter. Additional $200 for lab fee will be assessed.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Lawrence, Dea.530D / 009 97MWYHT/1:15pm-2:05pm R/1:15pm-2:55pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 1:30pm14 325
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter. Additional $200 for lab fee will be assessed.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Stokstad, Pau.530D / 010 97MWYJT/1:15pm-2:05pm R/1:15pm-2:55pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 1:30pm18 340
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter. Additional $200 for lab fee will be assessed.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Spiliopoulos, Ela.530D / 011 97MWYKW/4:15pm-5:05pm F/11:00am-12:40pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 1:30pm14 340
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter. Additional $200 for lab fee will be assessed.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective / Costello, Nan.530E / 012 97MWYNT/1:15pm-2:05pm R/1:15pm-2:55pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 11:00am18 335
(Formerly LAW500V) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter, with a focus on trademark, copyright and patent law. A section fee of $350 will be assessed. This fee supports simulated exercises, including program's final trials.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective / Costello, Nan.530E / 013 97MWYPT/2:30pm-3:20pm R/3:30pm-5:10pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 1:30pm18 335
(Formerly LAW500V) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter, with a focus on trademark, copyright and patent law. A section fee of $350 will be assessed. This fee supports simulated exercises, including program's final trials.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Social Justice Perspectives / Rosa, Jen.530Q / 014 97MWYRW/9:00am-9:50am F/9:00am-10:40am Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 11:00am18 325
This course covers the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, but the written projects focus around social justice issues. The topics of assignments may include, but are not limited to, any of the following areas of law: human rights issues, equal access to education and health care, child welfare, human trafficking, immigration, or issues surrounding the Native American community. The problems will give students an opportunity to reflect on what social justice means, and how we can utilize the justice system to achieve equity for marginalized populations. This course is for students who have an interest in social justice issues or who will likely seek positions with public interest organizations. A section fee of $350 will be assessed. This fee supports simulated exercises, including program's final trials.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Social Justice Perspectives / Rosa, Jen.530Q / 015 97MWYSW/11:00am-11:50am F/11:00am-12:40pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 1:30pm18 325
This course covers the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, but the written projects focus around social justice issues. The topics of assignments may include, but are not limited to, any of the following areas of law: human rights issues, equal access to education and health care, child welfare, human trafficking, immigration, or issues surrounding the Native American community. The problems will give students an opportunity to reflect on what social justice means, and how we can utilize the justice system to achieve equity for marginalized populations. This course is for students who have an interest in social justice issues or who will likely seek positions with public interest organizations. A section fee of $350 will be assessed. This fee supports simulated exercises, including program's final trials.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective / LaRose, Ste.530N / 016 97MWYTT/10:30am-11:20am R/10:30am-12:10pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 11:00am18 341
This course covers all the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, however, all of the written projects, including a closed memorandum, a client letter, and a research memorandum, are placed in the setting of criminal litigation. This course is for students who have an interest in criminal law and/or wish to produce writing samples for a position with a prosecutor or public defender's office, with a private firm that handles criminal litigation, with a state or federal appellate court, or with a trial court that handles a criminal docket. A section fee of $350 will be assessed. This fee supports simulated exercises, including program's final trials.
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective / LaRose, Ste.530N / 017 97MWYUT/1:15pm-2:05pm R/1:15pm-2:55pm Exams on 10/26 AND 11/9 at 1:30pm18 341
This course covers all the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, however, all of the written projects, including a closed memorandum, a client letter, and a research memorandum, are placed in the setting of criminal litigation. This course is for students who have an interest in criminal law and/or wish to produce writing samples for a position with a prosecutor or public defender's office, with a private firm that handles criminal litigation, with a state or federal appellate court, or with a trial court that handles a criminal docket. A section fee of $350 will be assessed. This fee supports simulated exercises, including program's final trials.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Upper Level Required
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Professional Responsibility / Bullington, Cyn.500Q / 301 97MR8NTR/6:00PM-7:15PM80 473 12-19-2018 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 260) A course designed to acquaint the law student with many of the obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives. In addition to a discussion of ethical problems involved in the practice of law, an overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students who have already taken Lawyer Regulation and Ethics in a Technology-Driven World may not take this course.
3 Professional Responsibility / Fletcher, Mat.500Q / 001 97MR8MMW/10:30AM-11:45AM80 474 12-13-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 260) A course designed to acquaint the law student with many of the obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives. In addition to a discussion of ethical problems involved in the practice of law, an overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students who have already taken Lawyer Regulation and Ethics in a Technology-Driven World may not take this course.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Electives
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Administrative Law / Kalt, Bri.532 / 001 97MR5DMW/10:30AM-11:45AM80 472 12-13-2018 8:30 AM
Formerly DCL 300) This course examines the place of administrative agencies in American government, and surveys the legal rules and principles governing agency regulation, adjudication, investigation, and enforcement; agency structure; and judicial review of agency action. Students who have taken Administrative Law: Food Safety and Labeling (810K) may not take this course
2 Advanced Legal Research / Hanna, Hil. & Meland, Jan.586 / 001 97MR5GW/2:15PM-3:55PM20 325 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
1 Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Microeconomics / Mercuro, Nic.509A / 001 97MR5HMW/9:00AM-10:15AM 8-27-18 to 10-1-1820 324 10-08-2018 9:00 AM
(Formerly DCL 607A) Condensed principles of microeconomics to serves as a primer that provides law students the tools necessary to succeed as 'lawyers' in the various fields that use these principles.
Prerequisite(s): Students who have taken Law and Economics (515) may not take this course.
3 Artificial Intelligence & Law / Reyes, Car.537R / 001 97MR5NTR/10:30AM-11:45AM40 325 Final Paper, U
Artificial Intelligence is experiencing a “golden age” of rapid development. As the use of AI increases, people and computers are knowingly and unknowingly interacting in new ways. Lawyers are confronting computer issues in every practice area. Smart contracts. Autonomous vehicles. Creation and ownership of property. Robot policing and warfare. Interconnected products. Autonomous devices. AI requires updated and new regulations, new ways of practicing, and an understanding of how laws and code interact as a new regulatory system within society. This class will look at how computers are affecting the law and what lawyers should know to provide legal services in this hybrid world.
3 Basic Income Taxation / Barnhizer, Dan.501K / 001 97MR5RTR/4:00PM-5:15PM80 472 12-12-2018 6:00 PM
This survey course introduces the basic concepts of federal income taxation and is ideal for students interested in learning basic information about tax law but who are not yet certain if they want to specialize in tax or business fields. Students will get practice in the skills of statutory construction and applying a broad range of legal authorities to clients’ concrete problems, skills which are valuable for all law students regardless of whether they ultimately specialize in tax. In this course, students will be exposed to tax issues that affect individuals, including sole proprietorships, and will gain an understanding of various forms of income, exclusions from income, capital gains and losses, various deductions, and other topics. The course uses a modified Socratic approach with an emphasis on problem solving that will allow students to develop facility in analyzing cases, statutes, and administrative materials. Sample examination questions are provided to allow a student to determine how well he or she learned and retained the material. The grade in the course is based on a final examination with consideration given to class participation. Students who enroll in Basic Income Taxation for 2 credits are ineligible to enroll in Basic Income Taxation for 3 credits.
3 Basic Will Drafting / Behan, Mic.540A / 301 97MR5STR/6:00PM-7:15PM20 344 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 391) This course is designed to familiarize students with the interviewing function and the drafting of wills and other basic estate planning vehicles for clients whose estates are not subject to federal estate tax. An evaluation of usable forms and discussion of when and how to use them intelligently will be a focus of the course. A client interview and drafting exercises, including an entire basic estate plan, are contemplated.
Prerequisite(s): Decedents' Estates and Trusts
4 Business Enterprises / Bean, Bru.500M / 001 97MR5TTR/10:30AM-12:10PM100 473 12-13-2018 1:30 PM
This course deals with issues relating to common forms of business organization, including corporations, limited liability companies and closely held corporations. The four credit version of Business Enterprises also includes an introduction to mergers and acquisitions.
4 Business Enterprises / Walther, Ben.500M / 002 97MR5UTR/4:00PM-5:40PM30 324 12-12-2018 6:00 PM
This course deals with issues relating to common forms of business organization, including corporations, limited liability companies and closely held corporations. The four credit version of Business Enterprises also includes an introduction to mergers and acquisitions.
1 Capstone Intellectual Property and Communications Law Seminar / Candeub, Ada.535E / 001 97MR5VM/1:00PM-1:50PM15 341 No Exam,
This course uses presentations by leading scholars of their works-in-progress in the area of IP and communications law. Students will be responsible for reading the papers, writing a critique, preparing questions and participating in the seminar.. This course is highly recommended for all students who wish to write a ULWR or law review note in intellectual property, information, or communications law in a subsequent semester.
2 Client Counseling and Interviewing / Winegarden, J. .591A / 301 97MR54W/6:00PM-7:40PM20 335 Take Home Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 450) This course adopts a client-centered approach in looking at legal problems and examines how to make clients partners in problem solving. Attention is paid to the economic, social and psychological aspects of clients' legal problems. The course starts with an examination of fundamental counseling skills, followed by an analysis of the information gathering process and ultimate decision making. Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence
4 Constitutional Law II / Lawrence, Mic.500N / 001 97MR56TR/10:30AM-12:10PM80 474 12-14-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 172) A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
4 Constitutional Law II / Saunders, Kev.500N / 002 97MR57TR/1:15PM-3:00PM80 471 12-18-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 172) A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
2 Construction Law / Deneweth, Ron.601 / 001 97MR58T/5:30PM-7:10PM15 340 12-19-2018 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 314) A survey of legal issues with respect to the construction industry. Topics discussed include bid errors, contract disputes, and payment issues. Students will be given an overview of project delivery systems, and the contract clauses found in proprietary and industry standard contract documents. Suretyship and mechanic's lien laws are an integral part of the course.
3 Consumer Law / Chen, Jam.593G / 001 97MR59MW/2:15PM-3:30PM15 340 Final Paper, U **
This course examines special requirements for consumer transactions. It includes deception in the marketplace, including many disclosure requirements; credit (discrimination, accuracy, and other limitations),; debt collection practices; and consumer remedies. Both federal and state laws will be covered. One focus will be how these requirements supersede normal contract, tort, and property laws. Civil, administrative, and criminal actions will be addressed.
Footnote(s): This class is cross enrolled with students from MSU graduate and honors programs.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II, Property, Torts I
3 Corporate Law & Finance Seminar / Walther, Ben.508N / 001 97MR6DTR/2:00PM-3:15PM20 324 Final Paper, U
This advanced course in corporate law and corporate finance explores complex issues in contemporary law, with a focus on issues likely to arise in a sophisticated real-world corporate or transactional practice. Students will also receive instruction on and significant practice with writing skills, especially those necessary for success in a business law practice. Course work will include memo-writing and a final paper, with extensive and highly detailed comments from the professor. Course reading materials emphasize very recent cases, so as to focus learning on the law as it exists today.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
3 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication / O'Brien, Bar.616C / 001 97MR6ETR/9:00AM-10:15AM80 474 12-17-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure II) This course examines various issues associated with criminal adjudications with a focus on federal constitutional rights. The course covers issues such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, bail and pretrial detention, discovery, the plea bargaining process, speedy trial rights, federal sentencing guidelines, and post-conviction review. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Criminal Procedure: Investigation in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure II are ineligible to enroll in this course.
3 Criminal Procedure: Investigation / Totten, Mar.616B / 001 97MR6FMW/8:30AM-9:45AM80 474 12-11-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
3 Criminal Procedure: Investigation / Grosso, Cat.616B / 002 97MR6GTR/8:30AM-9:45AM80 471 12-17-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
3 E-Discovery / Candeub, Ada.537D / 001 97MR6HMW/8:30AM-9:45AM50 346 No Exam, E
This course will cover the rules and procedures for conducting discovery of electronically stored information (ESI). This course will examine the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, with their relatively recent amendments. This course will focus on the rules and caselaw, and is an experiential course built around exercises using discovery software.
1 Effective Legal Analysis & Process / Short, Meg.530P / 001 97MWYVM/12:00pm-12:50pm4 344 No Exam,
The purpose of this course is to build the critical skills necessary to succeed in law school and on the bar exam. Various hands-on activities will help students master skills such as careful reading, issue spotting, structuring an answer, managing time, balancing the analysis of a close question, and taking both multiple choice and essay tests.
3 Employment Law / Bedikian, Mar.511C / 001 97MTPGTR/1:15pm-2:55pm4 474 12-17-2018 1:30 PMP **
(Formerly DCL 522) This is an introductory employment law course, which will begin with the foundations of employment law, including an examination of the employment relationship and terms and conditions of employment. A substantial portion of the course will cover federal legislation and related case law, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).
Footnote(s): Class meets 8-28-18 to 11-1-18
Prerequisite(s): Students may not take this course if they have taken Labor and Employment Law.
2 Entrepreneurial Lawyering / Kennedy, Den.537E / 001 97MR6JM/4:00PM-5:40PM40 345 Final Paper,
This course helps students understand the economic pressures, technological changes, and globalization facing the legal profession in the 21st century, and to assist students in successfully navigating their legal career given these challenges. The course explores the concept of a virtual law practice as well as the use of technology and cloud-computing in building a law practice; free and low-cost resources and tools will be shared that will help the entrepreneur-minded student identify ways to leverage leading-edge technology to defray start-up costs associated with launching a practice and to control overhead. Ethics, licensing, and malpractice issues will also be discussed. The course will be particularly useful for students who are contemplating solo practice, consulting, or engaging in an entrepreneurial venture, as well as those who are considering non-traditional uses for their law degree. Other topics to be covered include client development and networking, case studies of innovative legal services delivery mechanisms and alternative business structures, and work/life balance including the study of emotional intelligence and mindful lawyering practices. This course assumes students may (or may not) arrive with a range of experience in the use of technology we will provide training for everything needed to succeed in this course.
3 Equity / Johnson, Cla.579F / 001 97MR6KTR/8:30AM-9:45AM30 345 12-17-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 333) Considered are the history and development of equity, equity jurisdiction, remedies available in equity and contempt powers.
Prerequisite(s): Students who have taken Remedies may not take this class.
4 Evidence / Bitensky, Sus.500P / 002 97MR6NTR/1:15PM-2:55PM80 472 12-18-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 220) A study of the means and methods of proof or disproof of a proposition as either permitted, required or prohibited under the Anglo-American system of jurisprudence. The rules respecting problems of remoteness and prejudice of evidence, circumstantial proof, the employment of writings, their authentication and proof of their contents. A study in depth of hearsay evidence and its status in the evidence. A thorough inquiry into the so-called "evidential preferences" of our legal system and the deficiencies of hearsay evidence as related to these preferences.
3 Evidence / Pucillo, Phi.500P / 001 97MR6MMW/4:15PM-5:30PM80 472 12-18-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 220) A study of the means and methods of proof or disproof of a proposition as either permitted, required or prohibited under the Anglo-American system of jurisprudence. The rules respecting problems of remoteness and prejudice of evidence, circumstantial proof, the employment of writings, their authentication and proof of their contents. A study in depth of hearsay evidence and its status in the evidence. A thorough inquiry into the so-called "evidential preferences" of our legal system and the deficiencies of hearsay evidence as related to these preferences.
3 Family Law: Marriage & Divorce / Starnes, Cyn.541E / 002 97MR6RTR/1:15pm-2:30pm80 473 12-12-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly Family Law I: Marriage & Divorce) This course examines laws governing entry into marriage, access to divorce, the economics of divorce (property distribution, alimony and child support), child custody, premarital agreements, and cohabitation. Students may take Family Law: Marriage & Divorce and Family Law: Child, Family, and State in any order or at the same time.
3 Family Law: Marriage & Divorce / Starnes, Cyn.541E / 001 97MR6PTR/10:30AM-11:45AM45 346 12-12-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly Family Law I: Marriage & Divorce) This course examines laws governing entry into marriage, access to divorce, the economics of divorce (property distribution, alimony and child support), child custody, premarital agreements, and cohabitation. Students may take Family Law: Marriage & Divorce and Family Law: Child, Family, and State in any order or at the same time.
3 Federal Jurisdiction / McKeague, Dav.579G / 001 97MR6SMW/9:00AM-10:15AM20 340 12-11-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 349) The focus of this course is the operation of the federal court system. It will cover not only the usual bases of federal court jurisdiction, such as diversity, federal questions and removal, but also other doctrines that impact federal courts, including standing, ripeness, mootness, abstention and state sovereign immunity. Significant attention will be focused on federal litigation under the Civil Rights Acts. This course will be of benefit to those intending to practice in federal courts and to those seeking a federal court clerkship.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure
3 Federal Law and Indian Tribes / Singel, Wen.635B / 001 97MR6TMW/10:30AM-11:45AM24 340 12-13-2018 8:30 AM **
(Formerly DCL 486) An examination of the law and policy of the United States regarding Indian tribes and their citizen members. Study the relationships between the federal, state, and tribal governments; and examine the source and scope of federal, state and tribal authority in Indian Country
Footnote(s): This class is cross enrolled with students from MSU graduate and honors programs.
2 Global Perspectives on Indigenous Peoples / Singel, Wen.635G / 001 97MR64T/10:30AM-12:10PM15 344 Final Paper, **
(Formerly titled Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Global Perspectives on Indigenous Peoples) There are nearly 400 million indigenous peoples throughout the world. Historically, many indigenous peoples have experienced displacement, loss of control over resources, forced assimilation, and genocide. Students will study the place of indigenous peoples within the international legal system and the rights of indigenous peoples within the domestic legal systems of several countries. A portion of this course will focus on international law and institutions principally focused on indigenous peoples; challenges of asserting indigenous rights using the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the ILO Conventions 107 and 169, the Draft American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the World Bank\'s Operational Policy 4.10 and related Bank Procedures; and indigenous claims brought before the Inter-American Human Rights System. Students also will study the comparative law of indigenous peoples. The law of several jurisdictions, including the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Norway, and Colombia will be examined to compare their treatment of indigenous rights. The themes of indigenous rights to self-determination and rights to land, resources, and cultural survival will be addressed throughout the course.
Footnote(s): This class is cross enrolled with students from MSU graduate and honors programs.
2 Government Relations and Lobbying Law / Pirich, Joh. & Swartzle, Bro.551D / 001 97MR65T/10:30AM-12:10PM20 340 Final Paper,
This course provides an overview of governmental relations and lobbying law. It will address topics such as compliance with state and federal statutes and regulations that govern the practice and ethics of lobbying. The course will explore distinctions among legislative, administrative and grassroots lobbying and the professional norms of appropriate behavior that apply to lobbyists.
2 Health Care Law / Goebel, Eli.558C / 001 97MR67R/8:30AM-10:10AM20 335 12-17-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 458) THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS. Survey of major aspects of substantive health care law and regulation. Topics include: 1) Health care economics, including the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, health insurance, Medicare and Medicaid; 2) Health facility regulation, including quality assurance programs, licensing and Medicare-imposed operational requirements; 3) Health professional (practitioner) regulation, including board certification, licensure, medical staff credentialing and corporate practice of medicine; 4) Managed care, including organizational structures, regulation, contracting practices and vicarious liability; 5) Regulation of human subject research; 6) Personal autonomy, surrogate decisionmakers and death and dying; 7) Kickback, Fraud and Abuse and Stark II regulation of referral patterns; 8) Corporate structure and federal tax exemption of health care institutions. Medical malpractice and tort liability will not be emphasized. A final examination is required.
2 Hospitality Law / Deacon, Bra. & Ten Brink, Cha.605A / 301 97MR68M/6:00PM-7:40PM25 325 Final Paper, S
Students learn to identify and manage the legal issues raised by clients providing lodging, food, and alcohol to the public, with a focus on entrepreneurship and small business models, and particular attention to the intersection of local, state, and federal regulation. Topics would include choice of business form, duties to guests and others, food and alcohol regulation, lodging and land use regulation. The course will include several case studies requiring students to consider clients’ business plans and provide appropriate legal analysis and advice.
Prerequisite(s): Torts (Law 500R) and Contracts (Law 530B)
3 Integrative Law & Social Work / Kozakiewicz, Jos.541J / 001 97MR7EM/9:00AM-11:30AM20 345 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 474) The Integrative Law and Social Work Seminar is offered only to law students and second year master-level social work students accepted into the one-year Chance at Childhood Program which begins each fall semester. The spring course is a continuation of this two semester seminar that is part of the Chance at Childhood Certificate Program. The certificate program is designed to strengthen the knowledge base, practice and advocacy skills of law students and master-level social work students interested in working with abused, neglected and at-risk children and families. The seminar emphasizes select issues related to child abuse and neglect from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Major: CHLD. Must be in the Child and Family Advocacy Certificate program.
3 Intellectual Property Survey / Pager, Sea.535D / 001 97MR7GMW/10:30AM-11:45AM30 324 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 321 and LAW 533V) Formerly known as Intellectual Property Law. This course could be offered for 2 or 3 credits. This course is a survey of all Intellectual Property law, including patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secret law. No technical degree is necessary.
Prerequisite(s): This course is not open to students who have taken 2 of the 3 following courses: Copyright Law, Patent Law, or Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law.
3 International Taxation and Tax Treaties / Dunn, Ste.545P / 001 97MR7ZM/4:00PM-6:45PM20 341 12-18-2018 1:30 PM
The course surveys U.S. taxation of U.S. and foreign persons engaged in international activities. Topics will include U.S. jurisdiction to tax, tax treaties, allocation of income, transfer pricing, foreign tax credits, etc. It will also explore issues of tax policy in a variety of settings to provide students with the background necessary to understand basic tax principles as well as to contribute to the formation of tax laws and policies at home and abroad.
Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Tax (2 or 3 credit)
4 Labor and Employment Law / Bedikian, Mar.511E / 001 97MR72TR/1:15PM-2:55PM35 474 12-17-2018 1:30 PM **
This is an introductory labor and employment law course, which will initially explore the application of the National Labor Relations Act as amended. Subjects include the jurisdiction, organization and procedures of the National Labor Relations Board; the protection of the right of self-organization; company domination of or assistance to the union; discrimination against employees; remedies for unfair labor practices; unit determinations including micro-units; strikes, boycotts and picketing; judicial review of labor arbitration awards; successorship and the impact of bankruptcy on the duty to bargain; the duty of fair representation; union security agreements/fair share contracts; and, the union’s power to compel concerted activities. The course also will cover foundations of employment law, including an examination of the employment relationship and terms and conditions of employment. A substantial portion of the course will cover federal legislation and related case law, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).
Footnote(s): This class is cross enrolled with students from MSU graduate and honors programs.
Prerequisite(s): Students may not take this course if they have taken Labor Law or Employment Law.
2 Land Use Planning / Ten Brink, Cha.566B / 001 97MR73R/3:15PM-5:45PM 8-30-18 to 11-1-1840 325 11-08-2018 3:15 PM
(Formerly DCL 401) THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS. Explores the principal methods of local government control of land use, with special emphasis on the theory and practice of zoning and eminent domain. Analyzes judicial response, through the use of nuisance and "takings" doctrines, to local land use planning efforts.
Prerequisite(s): Property
0 Law Externship Seminar / Thompson, Cou.625D / 730 97MZMXOnline10 P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Wease, Chr.625D / 731 97MZMYOnline10 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Thompson, Cou.625D / 001 97MZMTW/6:30pm-8:00pm9 346 No Exam, P
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
2 Law Practice Management / Wagner, Dou.592 / 001 97MR74R/10:30AM-12:10PM20 340 Final Paper,
This course focuses on the business fundamentals needed to build a strong law practice of sustaining value, regardless of firm size. It introduces students to the common forms of private practice (partnership, professional corporations and sole practitioners), governance, economic considerations, compensation systems, personnel management, necessary capital investment, systems development and compliance issues. It also examines individual practice management challenges, such as personal marketing, client management, pricing and project management, personal business planning and managing professional relationships.
3 Licensing Intellectual Property / Carter-Johnson, Jen.533F / 001 97MR76MW/4:30PM-5:45PM30 325 12-18-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 516) The class focuses on managing an intellectual property portfolio to maximize a client's return on investment in intellectual property assets. Unlike other intellectual property courses that focus on obtaining intellectual property rights, the scope of those rights, and the remedies for infringing, this course emphasizes the identification, valuation, and management of intellectual property assets both as a source of revenue and as part of a larger offensive or defensive litigation strategy. Topics covered also include intellectual property assets, management, and licensing in the context of tax and antitrust law. Students will be required to draft part of a license agreement or agreement to transfer ownership of an intellectual property asset. Time permitting, this course will also cover cross-border intellectual property transactions. At the conclusion of this course, a student should appreciate the role of intellectual property as part of creation and management of a larger enterprise.
3 Matrimonial Practice / Bank, Mar. & Brown, Eri. & Rifkin, B. .541M / 001 97MR77F/9:00AM-11:30AM20 474 12-17-2018 1:30 PME S
(Formerly DCL 532) This course provides the practical knowledge and skills necessary to develop expertise in handling matrimonial matters from initial client contact through each step of the proceedings, including Motion Practice and Temporary Orders, Discovery, Custody, Equitable Distribution, Support, Negotiations/Settlement, Mediation, and Settlement Drafting.
3 Mergers and Acquisitions / Bean, Bru.516 / 001 97MR78W/2:15PM-4:45PM40 346 12-19-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 505) Overview of issues relating to business combinations. The course includes a transactional perspective on mergers and acquisitions, with some consideration of the social and economic significance of business combinations. Attention will be paid to relevant statutes, negotiation, acquisition documents, valuation methodologies, and characteristic problems in negotiated acquisitions, in addition to careful examination of takeover defenses and Delaware case law. Simulations and drafting exercises may be a component.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
1 Michigan Statutory Personal Injury Practice / Payne, Kat.600C / 001 97MR79W/4:00PM-5:40PM 8-29-18 to 10-10-1860 474 10-17-2018 4:00 PM **
The course will examine the key statutory provisions necessary to analyze Michigan personal injury cases including: no-fault, automobile negligence, owner's liability, dram shop, wrongful death, governmental immunity, and workers' compensation, and the major cases interpreting the statutory provisions. The course covers Michigan bar examined topics and is helpful to students who plan to practice in Michigan.
Footnote(s): Bar Prep Class
2 Moot Court Competition (Class) / Copland, Jen.627A / 001 97MR8AT/1:15PM-2:55PM20 428 No Exam, E P S
(Formerly DCL 700) An intramural Moot Court Competition open to all students after their first year. Students who wish to continue in the Moot Court Program must elect Moot Court Competition (Class) during their third semester. The class is a prerequisite for inter-school competition and staff positions.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Moot Court Competition (Class) / Copland, Jen.627A / 002 97MR8BT/8:30AM-10:10AM20 428 No Exam, E P S
(Formerly DCL 700) An intramural Moot Court Competition open to all students after their first year. Students who wish to continue in the Moot Court Program must elect Moot Court Competition (Class) during their third semester. The class is a prerequisite for inter-school competition and staff positions.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
3 Mortgages / Johnson, Cla.593C / 001 97MR8CTR/1:15PM-2:30PM40 345 12-17-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 406) This course considers various aspects of the law of suretyship and real property security, including land mortgages, land contracts, right to rents and profits before and after foreclosure sale, redemption, subordination agreements, circuity problems under contradictory systems of priorities pursuant to state and federal law, and security interests in fixtures under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and the land law.
Prerequisite(s): Property
2 Negotiation / Raheem, Ant.591C / 002 97MR8EW/2:15PM-3:55PM20 341 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 520) This course introduces principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in multiple mock negotiations, with frequent feedback from the instructor.
2 Negotiation / Hartfield, Edw.591C / 001 97MR8DR/2:00PM-3:40PM20 344 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 520) This course introduces principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in multiple mock negotiations, with frequent feedback from the instructor.
2 Patent Application Preparation / English, Tre.533J / 301 97MR8GW/6:00PM-7:40PM20 324 Final Paper, E S
(Formerly DCL 556) This course provides a structure and methodology for preparing a universal patent application suitable for filing in patent offices throughout the world. The course provides: 1) application drafting tools for implementing the requirements of Sections 102, 103 and 112 of Title 35, USC; 2) procedures in drafting the application to avoid issues raised in many litigated patents; 3) steps to be taken before actually drafting the application including inventor interview and searching; and 4) actual drafting of a patent application. An engineering or equivalent degree is recommended, i.e., the technical background required to take the patent agents examination to practice before the US Patent Office. PREREQUISITES OR TAKEN CONCURRENTLY: Patent Law OR approval of faculty program chair.
Prerequisite(s): Patent Law
3 Patent Law / Carter-Johnson, Jen.533K / 001 97MR8HMW/10:30AM-11:45AM40 346 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 564) This course provides a general introduction to patent law, introducing students to the basic legal rules and policies that constitute this important field of intellectual property law. Subjects covered include claim interpretation and patentable subject matter. Students will then spend the majority of the course studying the specific requirements for a valid patent, including the utility, written description, enablement, novelty, and non-obviousness requirements. Patent litigation topics such as infringement, defenses and damages will be covered as time permits. The course will focus on the new America Invents Act (AIA) but will also incorporate older rules as many currently existing patents will be analyzed under pre-AIA standards for the foreseeable future. Although patent cases often involve complicated scientific discoveries or technologies, the essential legal principles or policies rarely depend on understanding the underlying science or technology. Accordingly, students with non-technical backgrounds are encouraged to take this course, particularly given that intellectual property assets, such as patents, are increasingly important to commercial clients the world over.
3 Perspectives on U.S. Immigration Law / Thronson, Dav.541V / 001 97MR8JTR/3:00PM-4:15PM In Case Hall15 Case Hall 337 Final Paper, U
This interdisciplinary course will examine immigration law and policy from a variety of perspectives such as historical, social, public policy, economic, human rights, and legal perspectives. This approach allows students to explore the development and frameworks that underpin contemporary legal and social issues for more engaged analysis.
3 Public International Law / Reifenberg, Jr., Joh.548N / 001 97MR8PTR/10:30AM-11:45AM40 345 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 341) This course involves the study of the international legal system, sources and organizations. It also examines the relationship of individuals and states in international law and transnational legal and economic problems.
3 Remedies / Chen, Jam.593D / 001 97MR8RMW/10:30AM-11:45AM80 471 12-10-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 423) This course provides an overview of the main types of remedies available in the American legal system following a determination of liability for violation of contract, tort, property, or constitutional law. The course will cover monetary damages, equitable relief, and examine the implications of choosing particular remedies, when such choice is available.
Prerequisite(s): Students who have taken Equity may not take this course.
3 Sales and Leases / Reifenberg, Jr., Joh.501F / 001 97MR8STR/3:30PM-4:45PM40 345 Take Home Exam,
This course examines the information and terms, as well as remedies for breach, of contracts for sales of goods, under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). The course also examines Article 2A's provisions on leases and provides an overview of the similarities and differences between Article 2 of the UCC and the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods. Other topics that the course may cover include documents of title under Article 7 of the UCC, Magnuson Moss Warranty Act, or the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA). The class is not open to students who already have taken Commercial Transactions Survey (LAW 501M), or the 4-credit hour Sales and Secured Transactions class.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts. Students who have taken Commercial Transactions Survey or 4-cr. Sales and Secured Transactions may not take this class.
3 Sales and Leases / Spoon, Ell.501F / 002 97MR8TMW/2:15PM-3:30PM80 474 12-19-2018 1:30 PM
This course examines the information and terms, as well as remedies for breach, of contracts for sales of goods, under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). The course also examines Article 2A's provisions on leases and provides an overview of the similarities and differences between Article 2 of the UCC and the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods. Other topics that the course may cover include documents of title under Article 7 of the UCC, Magnuson Moss Warranty Act, or the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA). The class is not open to students who already have taken Commercial Transactions Survey (LAW 501M), or the 4-credit hour Sales and Secured Transactions class.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts. Students who have taken Commercial Transactions Survey or 4-cr. Sales and Secured Transactions may not take this class.
2 Secured Transactions / Payne, Kat.501E / 001 97MR8VM/4:15PM-5:55PM80 474 12-12-2018 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 240) Covers the process of financing the sale of goods, the secured transaction under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, including creation, perfection, priority of security interests in personal property and default procedures.
Prerequisite(s): Students who have taken Sales and Secured Transactions may not take this class.
3 Secured Transactions and Practice / Payne, Kat.501J / 001 97MR8UMW 2:15PM-3:30PM30 345 12-12-2018 8:30 AMS
Students may not elect this course after taking the two credit Secured Transaction course (501E). This course examines the intricacies of a secured transaction under Revised Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. The basic course content is the same as that covered in Secured Transactions (501E) including the creation, perfection and priority of security interests in personal property. Additionally, this course will include a drafting exercise and a more in-depth examination of the secured party’s practice in the bankruptcy arena. Students will draft a security agreement and complete all necessary companion paperwork based upon the sale of a business. Prerequisites: Contracts II (500E) OR Contracts (530B)
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts II
3 Seminar in Race, Law and American Culture: From Slavery to Post Civil Rights / Kuykendall, Mae.541S / 001 97MR8WM/4:00PM-6:30PM40 346 Take Home Exam,
This course examines race history in the United States, with primary reference to the culture and the law affecting African-Americans from slavery to post-Civil Rights. The objective of the course is to provide insight of the evolution of legal doctrine relating to race, examining and critically analyzing continuities and discontinuities; and equip students with the ability to debate, as lawyers and public citizens, the contemporary issues in race relations, with reference to the history of all racial and ethnic minorities and the complications of increasing diversity in racial, ethnic, and cultural traditions in the U.S.
2 Tax Policy Seminar / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.572D / 001 97MR83W/2:15PM-3:55PM20 335 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCl 517) This seminar covers a range of tax policy issues arising from Federal Taxation. The specific issues studied will vary but, in general, will focus on progressivity and redistribution. Topics likely to be covered include: the use of the income tax as a fiscal policy tool; the concept of income; imputed income; progressive versus flat tax rates; taxation of families; income versus consumption taxation; tax expenditures, exclusions, and deductions; taxation of business and investment income; capital gains and losses; and transfer or wealth taxes. A paper will be required. The topic will be determined after consultation with the instructor.
2 Topics in Constitutional Law: International Perspectives on Speech / Saunders, Kev.579U / 001 97MXCTR/10:30am-12:10pm20 344 Final Paper, U
This course will examine a number of free speech issues in a variety of democratic countries. There will also be a paper that meets the ULWR. The first half of the course will examine material in the course text. The second half will consist of presentations of student papers.
2 Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law / Darnton, Jam.533N / 301 97MR87T/5:45PM-7:25PM20 345 12-19-2018 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 461) This course addresses current issues and developments such as the constitutional foundations and limitations of trademark protection, domain names and cybersquatting.
3 Trial Practice Institute - Trial I / Payok, Mat.623D / 302 97MR89T/5:45PM-8:15PM16 428 Oral Exam, E S **
(Formerly DCL 534) Must be in the Trial Practice Institutue program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II. A section fee of $350 will be assessed. This fee supports simulated exercises, including program’s final trials.
Footnote(s): Final trial dates Nov. 30-Dec.2, 2018
3 Trial Practice Institute - Trial I / Aquilina, Ros.623D / 301 97MR88W/5:45PM-8:15PM16 428 Oral Exam, E S **
(Formerly DCL 534) Must be in the Trial Practice Institutue program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II. A section fee of $350 will be assessed. This fee supports simulated exercises, including program’s final trials.
Footnote(s): Final trial dates Nov. 30-Dec.2, 2018
3 Trial Practice Institute: Pre-Trial I / Sherman, Ann.623B / 302 97MR9CM/5:45PM-8:15PM16 428 No Exam, E S **
(Formerly DCL 506) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Footnote(s): Final trial dates Nov. 30-Dec.2, 2018
3 Trial Practice Institute: Pre-Trial I / McNally, Ver.623B / 001 97MR9BMW/10:30AM-11:45AM16 428 No Exam, E S **
(Formerly DCL 506) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Footnote(s): Final trial dates Nov. 30-Dec.2, 2018
1 Trial Practice Institute: Trial Practicum / McNally, Ver.623J / 002 97MR9GM/2:05pm-3:55pm 10-22-18 to 12-3-1832 428 No Exam, E P S **
This course will provide the foundation for trial work to all TPI students, but is designed for TPI students who do not have advocacy experience through the Moot Court & Trial Advocacy Board (Board). The course includes instruction on the component parts of a trial, such as opening statement, direct examination, cross examination, and closing argument. It also explores introducing exhibits, impeachment, the mechanics of refreshing recollection, and the recorded recollection hearsay exception. It will also provide students with an opportunity to refine these skills on their feet.
Footnote(s): This section for TPI students only
1 Trial Practice Institute: Trial Practicum / McNally, Ver.623J / 001 97MR9FT/10:30AM-12:10PM 8-28-18 to 10-9-18 Non-TPI section18 428 No Exam, E P S **
This course will provide the foundation for trial work to all TPI students, but is designed for TPI students who do not have advocacy experience through the Moot Court & Trial Advocacy Board (Board). The course includes instruction on the component parts of a trial, such as opening statement, direct examination, cross examination, and closing argument. It also explores introducing exhibits, impeachment, the mechanics of refreshing recollection, and the recorded recollection hearsay exception. It will also provide students with an opportunity to refine these skills on their feet.
Footnote(s): This section for non-TPI students
2 Trial Practice Institute: Expert and Scientific Evidence / Payok, Mat.623F / 301 97MR9AR/6:00PM-7:40PM32 428 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 543) This course will present students with a discussion of the nature of forensic science and scientific evidence. Topics include: forensic science, scientific evidence, admissibility of scientific evidence, quality assurance and control. There will also be lectures on certain areas of forensic science that are often the subject of litigation. These include DNA, inferential statistics, traffic accident reconstruction, forensic engineering, forensic pathology, paternity testing and drunk driving. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
1 Trial Practice Institute: Theatrical Skills - Advocacy as a Performing Art / Ferris, Tom.623A / 002 97MR9EW/2:15PM-3:55PM 8-29-18 to 10-10-1816 428 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 533) A 7 week workshop designed to enhance a students' advocacy skills through application of actor training techniques by increasing student awareness of the ability to communicate effectively with both voice and body. The course consists of one 1 hour 50 minute session per week for 7 weeks in which students will participate in various acting exercises and improvisations emphasizing effective use of body language and physical expressiveness, developing spontaneity in presenting prepared material, exploring the rhetorical hooks and vocal nuances essential to persuasive speaking and strengthening storytelling skills. At the end of the workshop, students will present a public speech by a current or historical speaker as if it was an opening or closing argument to a jury. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
1 Trial Practice Institute: Theatrical Skills - Advocacy as a Performing Art / Ferris, Tom.623A / 001 97MR9DM/2:15pm-3:55pm 8-27-18 to 10-15-1816 428 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 533) A 7 week workshop designed to enhance a students' advocacy skills through application of actor training techniques by increasing student awareness of the ability to communicate effectively with both voice and body. The course consists of one 1 hour 50 minute session per week for 7 weeks in which students will participate in various acting exercises and improvisations emphasizing effective use of body language and physical expressiveness, developing spontaneity in presenting prepared material, exploring the rhetorical hooks and vocal nuances essential to persuasive speaking and strengthening storytelling skills. At the end of the workshop, students will present a public speech by a current or historical speaker as if it was an opening or closing argument to a jury. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
3 Trusts and Estates / Ten Brink, Cha.501D / 001 97MR9HMW/2:15PM-3:30PM80 471 12-11-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly Decedents' Estates and Trusts) A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
3 Trusts and Estates / Ten Brink, Cha.501D / 002 97MR9JMW/4:00PM-5:15PM80 471 12-11-2018 1:30 PM
(Formerly Decedents' Estates and Trusts) A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
2 Wildlife Law / Frampton, Car.565B / 001 97MR9KM/8:00AM-9:40AM15 341 Final Paper, **
(Formerly DCL 376) A study of how the legal system deals with wildlife issues. While federal law affecting wildlife is studied, this course's primary focus will be on the authority of the state fish and wildlife agencies to manage wildlife and the relationship of the federal and state governments as managers of the public’s wildlife. It will review wildlife related laws from a variety of perspectives, including those that recognize sustainable use as a valid conservation tool, and regulated hunting as a component of conservation and sound wildlife management. The class is responsible for publishing The Wildlife Law Call, a newsletter on current case law and articles pertinent to wildlife issues. Students are graded on their individual contribution to this publication.
Footnote(s): This class is cross enrolled with students from MSU graduate and honors programs.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Miscellaneous
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
1 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q / 005 97MYH3Arranged2 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
1-2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q / 001 97MUWUArranged3 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q / 002 97MUW7Arranged3 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
1-2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q / 003 97MUW8Arranged3 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
1-2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q / 004 97MUW9Arranged2 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
Var Appellate Competition / Lawrence, Mic.627Q / 006 97MZPGArranged2 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
Var Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q / 007 97MZS8Arranged4 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Arbitration Competition / Bedikian, Mar.627P / 001 97MY6BR/3:30pm-5:10pm9 430 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Arbitration Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of arbitration with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy, and Trial Practice Institute: Trial Practicum Permission Only
2 Negotiation Competition / Hartfield, Edw.627N / 001 97MXCER/4:00pm-6:00pm6 340 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school's Negotiation Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of negotiation with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy, and Contract Negotiation Permission Only
2 Trial Competition / McNally, Ver.627R / 001 97MZGPArranged4 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Mock Trial Team. The course covers the mechanics of trial practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
Var Trial Competition / McNally, Ver.627R / 002 97MZGNArranged4 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Mock Trial Team. The course covers the mechanics of trial practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Trial Competition / McNally, Ver.627R / 003 97MZGPArranged4 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Mock Trial Team. The course covers the mechanics of trial practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Clinics
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
6 Animal Welfare Clinic I / Nasser, Car.631R / 001 97MR5KW/10:00am-11:40am9 430 No Exam, E P S
Students will work on animal human legal issues in a variety of contexts including private and public law disputes, government administrative action and policy development. Through direct client representation and systemic advocacy, student will engage in activities such as litigation, regulatory comments, policy and legislative drafting, and creation of educational materials.
3 Animal Welfare Clinic II / Nasser, Car.631S / 001 97MR5MARRANGED2 No Exam, E P S
Continuation of Animal Welfare Clinic I.
4 Chance at Childhood Clinic I / Kozakiewicz, Jos.631F / 001 97MR5WW/8:30am-11:45am7 345 No Exam, E P S
The Clinic provides a setting for law and social work students to gain experience in child advocacy. The Clinic provides a forum for advocating for children, both in individual cases and through seeking to affect public policy and practice within the state of Michigan. Student teams will serve in a variety of roles to effectively advocate for children.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspective and Advocacy
VAR Civil Rights Clinic I / Manville, Dan.630X / 001 97MR52TR/3:30PM-5:10PM6 341 No Exam, E P S
Students will receive a versatile and well-rounded education in the intricacies of civil rights law and hone client management, case management, negotiation, and trial skills. Students will use their knowledge and skills to litigate civil rights cases in federal District Court (WD, MI) for their clients, prisoners who are incarcerated in Michigan and have asserted claims about the conditions of their confinement. Under the supervision of clinic faculty, students will represent their clients at all stages of these cases, including case development and strategy, discovery, motion practice, and trial. In addition to class times, students enrolled in this clinical program must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week NOTE: (1) Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for the application deadline). Preference will be given to students who commit to participate in the clinic for two semesters. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisite(s): All student clinicians enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic I must have successfully completed RWA and Advocacy. In addition, they must have successfully completed the first year (six credits) of the Law Colleges TPI program or must have successfully completed at least six credits in Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Rights Seminar, Complex Civil Litigation, or Constitutional Law II.
VAR Civil Rights Clinic II / Manville, Dan.630Z / 001 97MR53TR/3:30PM-5:10PM4 341 No Exam, E P S
This is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Civil Rights Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling clients, managing a caseload, and litigating civil rights cases on their clients’ behalf in federal District Court. Typically, students who are enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic II assume a more in-depth role in their clients’ litigation. As in Civil Rights Clinic I, students further their experience under the supervision of clinic faculty and enhance their knowledge of civil rights law and trial practice. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12 to15 hours weekly). NOTE: (1) Enrollment in Civil Rights Clinic II is by invitation only. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Rights Clinic I
4 Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I / Costello, Nan.630T / 001 97MR66TR/10:30AM-12:10PM12 335 No Exam, E P S
The Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic has three components. Students will teach First Amendment workshops to faculty advisors and student journalists at Michigan high schools covering censorship, libel, and privacy issues, as well as copyright and libel matters involving Facebook and Internet postings. Students also will provide pro bono legal representation to high school and community college journalists whose free speech rights have been challenged. In addition, clinic students will conduct a Freedom of Information Act survey of school district regulations that govern First Amendment rights of student journalists. Students will receive targeted instruction on First Amendment press issues on a weekly basis. As workshop instructors, students will use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings. Students will be responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once they are approved by a Law College faculty member and a high school teacher. In addition to class time, students must work a minimum of 12 hours each week in representing pro bono clients and preparing First Amendment workshops. Some travel time to high schools may be required. Students are selected to participate through an application process. NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisites: RWA I and II; (successful completion of Media Law is preferred, but not required)
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
VAR Housing Law Clinic I / Gilmore, Bri.630V / 001 97MR69MW/10:30AM-12:10PM9 341 No Exam, E P S
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic I - LAW 630A) Housing Law Clinic I is a comprehensive housing clinic that will cover a variety of housing areas for students. Students will have the opportunity to master the basics of local landlord-tenant law, and to focus on how the clinic can best serve the community in the housing area based upon the overall needs of the community and the problems facing consumers with respect to their housing choices. Other areas of clinic development and student advocacy will entail, but will not be limited to, foreclosures, fair housing, affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness. Students can be expected to be assigned actual clients with housing problems and will, with supervision, act as legal counsel for these clients in a variety of settings. This will include advocacy in local housing courts and judicial tribunals in the state of Michigan. However, students will be mainly trained to be advocates, in and out of a judicial setting, with the overall goal to provide the student with a more expansive and well-rounded experience regarding housing law in a legal education setting. Students also will have the opportunity to consider other areas of housing advocacy where they might be able to have an impact on the lives of consumers, and will be supervised and supported in pursuing these goals on behalf of consumers. Enrollment in Housing Law Clinic I is by application only. Details about the application process will be provided to students in advance of each semester's enrollment period. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student works between 12-15 hours weekly in addition to instructional time). NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory orientation session that will likely take place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II,Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy
4 Housing Law Clinic II / Gilmore, Bri.630W / 001 97MR7AARRANGED2 No Exam, E P S
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic II - LAW 630B) Housing Law Clinic II provides an opportunity for students, upon approval of the supervising faculty, to continue work Housing Law Clinic. The selected students will be expected to provide support and work more independently than students enrolled in Housing Law Clinic I. Expectations are high and ongoing projects and cases that these students are engaged in will be a core responsibility.
Prerequisite(s): Housing Law Clinic I, Rental Housing Clinic I
6 Immigration Law Clinic I / Thronson, Ver.630R / 001 97MR7BF/10:00AM-12:00PM9 344 No Exam, E P S
Students engage with immigrant communities through direct client representation and systemic advocacy. The Immigration Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to experience the practice of law in a well-supervised and academically rigorous program that both prepares them for the practice of law and enables them to critically assess social justice issues. In addition to client representation and advocacy, students participate in a clinic seminar. Students are required to work an average of 20 hours per week. Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for details of application process).
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II or Research, Writing & Analysis, Advocacy
4 Indian Law Clinic I / Fort, Kat.631J / 001 97MR7DTR/8:30AM-10:10AM6 344 No Exam, E P S
This course provides students with the opportunity to work the environment of a small law firm dedicated to the practice of indigenous law. Students in the Clinic conduct legal research and write briefs for appellate cases, research legal matters for tribes, and develop policy papers for tribal governments and organizations.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis Advocacy
3 Intellectual Property & Entrepreneurial Law Clinic I / Carter-Johnson, Jen. & Pager, Sea.631T / 001 97MR7FMW/2:30PM-3:45PM7 344 No Exam, E P S
The Intellectual Property & Entrepreneurial Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to experience the practice of law in a well-supervised and academically rigorous program. Students will work with entrepreneurial or non-profit ventures on matters related to intellectual property and entrepreneurial business law. Students will engage in direct client representation and systemic advocacy through activities such as client counseling, research, transactional analysis, litigation, regulatory comments, educational materials, and outreach. Enrollment is by application only.
6 Tax Clinic I / Wease, Jos.630C / 001 97MR8ZMW/9:00AM-10:40AM13 344 No Exam, E P S
(Formerly DCL 476) Students enrolled in Tax Clinic I become "client ready" by representing clients with respect to a broad range of federal, state, and local tax controversies. Students advocate for their clients by working through a variety of administrative determinations, as well as by routinely participating in collection due process and Appeals hearings before the Internal Revenue Service and informal conferences before the Michigan Department of Treasury. In addition, they litigate cases in the United States Tax Court, the Michigan Tax Tribunal, the United States District Courts, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and Michigan appellate courts. Students also counsel ESL taxpayers about their rights and responsibilities under the Internal Revenue Code, and engage in numerous outreaches designed to educate the public about tax issues and requirements. All work takes place under the guidance and close supervision of experienced clinical faculty. Class sessions focus not only on substantive tax issues, but also on professional development, ethical considerations, policy matters, and client and case management. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours - in addition to class time - during the semester, and are expected to participate in a one-day orientati1n scheduled before the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisite(s): For students admitted before Fall 2011, Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II; for students admitted in Fall 2011 and later, Research, Writing & Analysis and Advocacy.
4 Tax Clinic II / Wease, Jos.630D / 001 97MR82ARRANGED6 No Exam, E P S
(Formerly DCL 515) Tax Clinic II is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Tax Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling and representing clients, to take on more complex assignments, and to assist in mentoring Tax Clinic I students. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours during the semester.
Prerequisite(s): Tax Clinic I
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Journals
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
VAR International Law Review / Bean, Bru.629A / 001 97MR7KARRANGED6 TBD No Exam, P U
(Formerly Journal of International Law) Participation by writing competition upon satisfactory completion by day students of two full semesters and by evening students of three full semesters. Two credits of ungraded credit earned upon completion of a student article, a comment, required production work and participation in the organization of the International Law Symposium and the International Achievement Award Dinner.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Law Review / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.628 / 001 97MR75ARRANGED65 No Exam, P U
Participation is by invitation or writing competition upon satisfactory completion by full-time students of two full semesters and by part-time students of three full semesters. Four semester hours of ungraded credit earned upon successful completion of a casenote, a comment and all required production work.
Prerequisite(s): Credits completed and GPA
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Global Food Law - LL.M./M.J.

The following classes are open to students in the Global Food Law Program or with approval of the college. Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu.

Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. / Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Administrative Law: Food Safety and Labeling / Copland, Jen.810K / 730 97MR5EOnline20 Take Home Exam,
Administrative law is the body of constitutional, statutory, and common law principles that both constrain and seek to legitimize the exercise of powers by governmental agencies. The history of food safety and labeling regulations in the United States begins in the late 1800s and continues through present day, culminating recently in the 2011 enactment of the Food Safety Modernization Act, which creates a new system of federal oversight of domestically produced and imported food products. This course introduces students to the essential elements of administrative law and follows the basic structure of an administrative law course, but diverges from the traditional study by using cases and problems that are specific to food safety and food labeling issues in the United States. The primary goal of the class is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamental administrative law principles applied in matters involving the regulation of food and food products, and the ability to apply these principles to problems similar to those encountered in actual practice. To the extent possible, this class will be taught from a practice-oriented approach, requiring students to engage in problem-solving exercises online.Students who have taken Administrative Law (532) may not take this course.
3 Animal Health, World Trade, and Food Safety / Haskell, Sco.810E / 730 97MR5JOnline20 No Exam, **
The objective of this online course is to familiarize students with the history, development and workings of the OIE, with particular emphasis on its role as the organization responsible for setting international standards for animal health and zoonoses, and attention to its new mandates for animal welfare and food safety.
Footnote(s): Open to students in the Global Food Law (GFL) Program or with approval of the college.  Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in the European Union / Jukes, Dav.810B / 730 97MR6UOnline20 No Exam, **
This online course enables students to study the factors influencing the development of food regulation in the EU. By making full use of the internet, students will gain access to relevant documentation in support of their professional needs and, having followed the course, students will be able to make an informed interpretation of the content.
Footnote(s): Open to students in the Global Food Law (GFL) Program or with approval of the college.  Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in the U.S. / Fortin, Nea.810A / 730 97MR6VOnline20 Take Home Exam, **
An online course designed for anyone who must understand the legal and regulatory complexities of the regulation of food products in the United States including issues such as food and food safety regulation, regulatory compliance, HACCP, the regulation of genetic modifications, food additive regulation, food labeling, dietary supplements, the protection of the food supply, and the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act.
Footnote(s): Open to students in the Global Food Law (GFL) Program or with approval of the college.  Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
2 Foundations of Law and Legal Research / Domann, Bre.807A / 730 97MR6WOnline20 No Exam,
This online course provides an introduction to the American legal system with a special focus on the research and writing needs of international scholars and non-lawyers (focus on American jurisprudence and Global Food Law).
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 FSMA Produce Safety Rule / Card-Abela, Mel.810X / 730 97MR63Online20 No Exam, **
This course provides students with the legal perspective of FDA’s Produce Safety Rule of the Food Safety Modernization Act. This course has an administrative overtone, providing an understanding of the legislative and regulatory processes through an in-depth look at the relationship between the Food and Drug Administration, industry, consumer interest groups, and science communities.
Footnote(s): Open to students in the Global Food Law (GFL) Program or with approval of the college.  Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 International Business Transactions / Barnhizer, Dan.512B / 730 97MR7HOnline15 Take Home Exam, **
This course is an introduction to international business transactions. We will explore the following general topics: agreements for the international trading of goods, financing the international sale of goods, establishing and operating a foreign investment, the resolution of international business disputes and enforcement of dispute settlement awards.
Footnote(s): Open to students in the Global Food Law (GFL) Program or with approval of the college.  Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu
3 International Food Laws and Regulations / Fortin, Nea.810D / 730 97MR7JOnline20 Take Home Exam, **
The objective of this online course is to provide the student with an overview of the systems of food regulation practiced in different regions of the world including some of the cultural and social-economic factors which influence the regulation of food products in the specific region including issues such as genetic modification, importation, exportation, food additives, and regulatory compliance.
Footnote(s): Open to students in the Global Food Law (GFL) Program or with approval of the college.  Enrollment requests should be sent to foodlaw@law.msu.edu
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR