Course Descriptions

[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
[View All]

Campaign Finance & Regulation (2)
580A
Campaign Finance & Regulation will provide an in-depth analysis of the campaign finance structure at the state and federal level by analyzing case law, rules, regulatory trends and reviewing the institutions that govern candidates, political parties, political action committees, corporations, unions, non-profits organizations and individuals. The course will provide a guide to the practice of campaign finance from a practitioner’s perspective and emphasize practical preparation by focusing on the practical, policy and political aspects of campaign finance and its regulations.

Top

Capital Punishment (3)
579Y
A focus on federal constitutional law, primarily the 8th Amendment and its regulation of capital punishment. The federal constitutional law largely regulates state criminal law. Using the 8th Amendment and state criminal laws, the course will consider how death eligibility is defined and administered. It will explore the limits imposed by the Constitution and by various state and federal statutes. The course also will consider larger questions including, Why have the death penalty? Is the system working? Is it necessary? Is it fair? What changes should be made? As part of this inquiry we will consider the role of race in capital punishment, the impact of wrongful convictions, and recent moves to abolish or limit capital punishment in several jurisdictions. The course also examines the law of federal habeas corpus in the context of the death penalty. This section engages in a close reading of a complicated set of statutes, as well as the Supreme Court decisions construing those statutes.

Top

Capstone Intellectual Property and Communications Law Seminar (1)
535E
This course uses presentations by leading scholars of their works-in-progress in the area of IP and communications law. Students will be responsible for reading the papers, writing a critique, preparing questions and participating in the seminar.. This course is highly recommended for all students who wish to write a ULWR or law review note in intellectual property, information, or communications law in a subsequent semester.

Top

Chance at Childhood Clinic I (4)
631F
The Clinic provides a setting for law and social work students to gain experience in child advocacy. The Clinic provides a forum for advocating for children, both in individual cases and through seeking to affect public policy and practice within the state of Michigan. Student teams will serve in a variety of roles to effectively advocate for children.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspective and Advocacy

Top

Chance at Childhood Clinic II (0)
631G
A continuation of Chance at Childhood Clinic I.
Prerequisite(s): Chance at Childhood Clinic I

Top

Civil Procedure (4)
530A
(Formerly Civil Procedure I) A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.

Top

Civil Rights Clinic I (4)
630X
Students will receive a versatile and well-rounded education in the intricacies of civil rights law and hone client management, case management, negotiation, and trial skills. Students will use their knowledge and skills to litigate civil rights cases in federal District Court (WD, MI) for their clients, prisoners who are incarcerated in Michigan and have asserted claims about the conditions of their confinement. Under the supervision of clinic faculty, students will represent their clients at all stages of these cases, including case development and strategy, discovery, motion practice, and trial. In addition to class times, students enrolled in this clinical program must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week NOTE: (1) Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for the application deadline). Preference will be given to students who commit to participate in the clinic for two semesters. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisite(s): All student clinicians enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic I must have successfully completed RWA and Advocacy. In addition, they must have successfully completed the first year (six credits) of the Law Colleges TPI program or must have successfully completed at least six credits in Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Rights Seminar, Complex Civil Litigation, or Constitutional Law II.

Top

Civil Rights Clinic II (4)
630Z
This is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Civil Rights Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling clients, managing a caseload, and litigating civil rights cases on their clients’ behalf in federal District Court. Typically, students who are enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic II assume a more in-depth role in their clients’ litigation. As in Civil Rights Clinic I, students further their experience under the supervision of clinic faculty and enhance their knowledge of civil rights law and trial practice. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12 to15 hours weekly). NOTE: (1) Enrollment in Civil Rights Clinic II is by invitation only. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Rights Clinic I

Top

Client Counseling and Interviewing (2)
591A
(Formerly DCL 450)
This course adopts a client-centered approach in looking at legal problems and examines how to make clients partners in problem solving. Attention is paid to the economic, social and psychological aspects of clients' legal problems. The course starts with an examination of fundamental counseling skills, followed by an analysis of the information gathering process and ultimate decision making.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure, Evidence

Top

Commercial Arbitration (3)
505A
(Formerly Arbitration) A course dealing with all aspects of arbitrating disputes under collective bargaining agreements, including judicial review of arbitration procedures and analyses of the concepts applied by arbitrators in reaching their respective decisions. Students will have an opportunity to observe an actual arbitration in process and participate as an advocate in a mock arbitration.
Prerequisite(s): Evidence

Top

Commercial Transactions Survey (2)
501M
This course is designed, in particular, for third-year students who have not taken Sales and Leases (or the combined Sales and Secured class) and who want a review, for purposes of the bar exam, of Contracts law. The course will cover the Uniform Commercial Code rules on contract formation, the Statute of Frauds, the parol evidence rule, excuse, anticipatory repudiation, and damages. These UCC rules will be compared and contrasted with common law rules learned in first-year Contracts. The course is an excellent one for students preparing for the bar exam, because it provides a comprehensive examination and review of concepts tested on both the MBE and often by state-law essay questions. The class is not open to students who already have taken Sales and Leases, or the 4-credit hour Sales and Secured Transactions class.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts. Students who have taken Sales and Leases or 4-cr. Sales and Secured Transactions may not take this course.

Top

Comparative Free Expression (2)
549F
This course may be taught in either a lecture or seminar format. When taught as a lecture course it is case based. A number of topics in free expression are examined to see how they are differently treated in various democratic states. When taught as a seminar, there will be readings that will be discussed as a class in the first half of the course. Students will also research a topic involving free expression and its treatment in selected countries. In the second half of the course, papers the students develop will be presented to the class.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Constitutional Law I, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

Top

Constitutional Law and the Regulatory State (4)
530S
This course examines the constitutional, statutory, and administrative foundations of American government. The course has two separate, but interrelated goals: First, to introduce students to the structure of and principles behind the American constitutional order. Topics covered under this heading include the sources of federal regulatory authority, separation of powers, federalism, judicial review and theories of constitutional interpretation. Second, the course offers a basic understanding of the workings of the legislative and regulatory process, with special emphasis on the role of agencies, the policy tools at their disposal, and the scope of legislative and judicial oversight of administrative action. In this fashion this course seeks to highlight the intersection between constitutional and administrative law principles across American history and within contemporary debates.

Top

Constitutional Law II (4)
500N
(Formerly DCL 172)
A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.

Top

Constitutional Law of the European Union (Study Abroad) (1)
545C
This course is dedicated to the main problems of the structure and law of the European Union. Students will be introduced to the evolution of the European Communities and European Union and the present comparison to the federal structure of the United States. The course will also explain the specificity of the supranational character of the EU law, including the sources of law, the principles governing the legal order and the implementation of the EU law in the member states. In addition, the judicial institutions will be presented, with special emphasis on the Court of Justice of the European Union and its role in the interpretation of the EU law.

Top

Constitutional Law Seminar (2)
579C
This seminar on constitutional theory goes beyond the doctrinal analysis of the topics covered in introductory constitutional law courses to ask deeper normative questions about the United States constitutional system.


Top

Constitutional Litigation (3)
579X
This course provides a rigorous examination of the intricacies initiated by individuals seeking to vindicate federal constitutional rights. Primary emphasis will be placed on suits under 42 U.S.C §1983 against state and local governmental entities and their officials. Through a careful study of the many doctrines that the U.S. Supreme Court has pronounced and developed in connection with litigation under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 and Bivens, students will gain a significant understanding of and appreciation for the challenges that confront a constitutional claimant both in establishing liability and in obtaining a remedy. In particular, the course will focus on the essential elements of a § 1983 action, such as the requirement that the defendant have acted “under color of” state or local law, as well as the need to demonstrate that the constitutional violation at issue flowed from an official policy or custom in cases where the defendant is a municipality. There will also be substantial treatment of the various defenses that officials sued in their individual capacity may assert, including absolute immunity (available to those who perform legislative, judicial, and prosecutorial functions), qualified immunity, and res judicata. In addition, the availability of remedies such as damages, injunctive relief, and attorney fees will be explored.

Top

Construction Law (2)
601
(Formerly DCL 314)
A survey of legal issues with respect to the construction industry. Topics discussed include bid errors, contract disputes, and payment issues. Students will be given an overview of project delivery systems, and the contract clauses found in proprietary and industry standard contract documents. Suretyship and mechanic's lien laws are an integral part of the course.

Top

Consumer Law (2)
593G
This course examines special requirements for consumer transactions. It includes deception in the marketplace, including many disclosure requirements; credit (discrimination, accuracy, and other limitations),; debt collection practices; and consumer remedies. Both federal and state laws will be covered. One focus will be how these requirements supersede normal contract, tort, and property laws. Civil, administrative, and criminal actions will be addressed.


Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II, Property, Torts I

Top

Contract Drafting (3)
594A
The specific purpose of this class is to use contract principles that the student has learned in the first year as a vehicle to develop the student's abilities as a planner and counselor. It will involve the study of some of the common pitfalls encountered in contract drafting and called upon to perform specific exercises in which the student will use her/his basic knowledge of contracts to draft various documents. In the course of the drafting, the student will be required to predict what may happen, provide for that contingency and attempt to protect the client.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts

Top

Contracts (4)
530B
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E)
A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.

Top

Copyright Law (3)
533B
(Formerly DCL 375)
According to Article 1, Section 8, Clause 8 of the U.S. Constitution, Congress has the power to promote the "progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries." Congress has adopted copyright statutes to protect forms of expression, which include computer software. This course will explore the history of copyright protection, with a particular emphasis on entertainment litigation.

Top

Corporate Finance (3)
508B
(Formerly DCL 380)
In Corporate Finance the principles of accounting and valuation and the basic financial environment of closely held companies and public companies will be examined. Building on this foundation, the fundamental issues surrounding common stock, preferred stock and debt will be analyzed. Finally, all these fundamentals will be applied in examining financial issues with mergers and acquisitions and tender offers and in understanding how "deals" are done. Students who have not taken Business Enterprises are permitted to enroll in this course if they are simultaneously enrolled in Business Enterprises.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

Top

Corporate Governance and Compliance (2)
508F
(Formerly Corporate Law and Policy: Corporate Governance and Compliance) A survey of issues in corporate governance and compliance in light of the legal risks faced by corporations and corporate directors and officers in the legal environment presented by securities law, antitrust, tort law, environmental law, and other sources of liability. Specific topics include risk management, Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley, internal compliance programs, and corporate codes of conduct and codes of behavior.

Top

Corporate Income Taxation (3)
508C
(Formerly DCL 465)
The course will focus on federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders, the tax consequences of choice of entity, the formation and liquidations of corporations, the taxation of corporations and shareholders, and the tax aspects of S corporations. EITHER Basic Income Tax A OR Basic Income Tax B fulfills the prerequisite. If the system will not let you register with either of these prerequisites, please contact the Registrar's Office.
Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation

Top

Corporate Law Colloquium (2)
508M
This Colloquium is for students who have an interest in a specific corporate law topic, triggered by their participation in Business Enterprises, Mergers & Acquisitions, Corporate Finance or another course and who wish to delve deeply into their topic. Students will independently research their approved topic and educate Colloquium members through formal presentations. Each participant will also present a discussion draft and final paper on their topic. ULWR credit is available.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises

Top

Criminal Law (3)
500F
(Formerly DCL 131)
An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.

Top

Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (3)
616C
Concentration(s): Criminal Law
(Formerly Criminal Procedure II) This course examines various issues associated with criminal adjudications with a focus on federal constitutional rights. The course covers issues such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, bail and pretrial detention, discovery, the plea bargaining process, speedy trial rights, federal sentencing guidelines, and post-conviction review. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Criminal Procedure: Investigation in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure II are ineligible to enroll in this course.

Top

Criminal Procedure: Investigation (3)
616B
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.

Top

Criminal Trial Advocacy - PreTrial (2)
617A
(Formerly Criminal Trial I: Pre-Trial)
This practical course is designed to familiarize the student with the criminal justice process. The course consists of lectures and exercises covering criminal case initiation, the initial appearance, indictments, plea negotiations, pretrial discovery and pretrial motions leading up to up to a trial. Special emphasis will be placed on criminal procedure.
Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course. The Criminal Trial Advocacy classes are not sequential and may be taken in any order.
Prerequisite(s): Criminal Law

Top

Criminal Trial Advocacy Post-Conviction Remedies (2)
617C
(Formerly Criminal Trial Advocacy III Post-Conviction Remedies) This course focuses on the representation issues raised during the critical stage of sentencing. The following topics are covered: duties/function of counsel, statutes, types of sentencing, indeterminate sentencing, length, sentencing plan, credit for time served, concurrent/consecutive, PSIs, considerations, habitual offender, altering sentences, probation, violations, restitution, alternatives, plea bargaining, guilty pleas, Proposal B, good time); sentencing guidelines demonstration; post-conviction motions; criminal appeals; parole; habeas corpus, state and federal; prisoners' rights; and sentencing reform/capital punishment. Criminal Trial Advocacy classes are not sequential and may be taken in any order.

Top

Cyber Law/Network Regulations (2)
533S
This course examines legal policy issues arising from the Internet, with an emphasis on three broad areas: (1) impact of the Internet on traditional legal causes of action; (2) government regulation of the Internet; (3) international aspects of the Internet and the interplay among United States and foreign jurisdictions.

Top

Cybersecurity and Data Protection (2)
535S
This course introduces students to the inter-related topics of cybersecurity, data protection, and data privacy, considering both practical and legal aspects of these topics. This course helps students recognize, explain, and critique how the law and legal profession responds to the challenges raised in these topics. This course will survey personal and organizational cybersecurity, how data is created, collected, stored, and used, governmental and non-governmental approaches to data protection, and new approaches to data and data protection. This course will examine the current and future roles of lawyers and the framework of a lawyer’s duty of technology competence. This course will consider new legal roles (e.g., product counsel and legal operations), challenges these topics bring to traditional delivery of legal services, and how lawyers advise clients about managing risks in a rapidly-changing environment. This course will be particularly useful for students who are contemplating representing business or technology clients, using their law degree in non-traditional ways, or working in a data or cybersecurity practice. This course assumes students may (or may not) arrive with a range of knowledge and experience with cybersecurity and data protection, and we will provide the necessary introduction to these topics in class.

Top

Delivering Legal Services: New Legal Landscape (2)
537Q
This course is an introduction to modern legal services delivery. It exposes students to legal data collection and metrics, legal operations, and legal project leadership. We continue with legal supply chain management, pricing legal services, and legal services technologies. Throughout the semester we cover two key areas. We (1) discuss current and emerging legal services ideas (such as how to charge less but earn higher profits from your services), and (2) work on developing legal services skills. This course uses the lean thinking philosophy, the fastest growing method of legal services management. However, no prior experience in lean is required; you will learn what you need in class. Lean thinking includes process mapping and process improvement. We also complete exercises in agile project management and design thinking. Students pursuing traditional legal careers in legal aid, not-for-profit, corporate, government, criminal prosecution or defense, or law firms, will find this course very useful. Students interested in nontraditional legal services careers, such as legal consulting, legal marketing, legal technology, and legal operations, will find it essential. The ideas and skills covered in this course give students an advantage in marketing themselves and in their future careers. This course is a foundation for other courses in the LegalRnD Program, but is not a prerequisite.

Top

Directed Study (0)
624
(Formerly DCL 690)
Students may receive credit for research and writing in areas of interest to them. This must be worked out in advance with a member of the full-time faculty. Ordinarily a paper of at least 20 pages is required, not counting endnotes, for two hours credit. A maximum of four credit hours may be applied towards graduation. Students on Reexamination Probation II are ineligible for directed studies.

Top

Domestic Violence (2)
541B
(Formerly DCL 427)
A historical background of Domestic Violence. Focus will be placed on understanding the nature of domestic violence, the prevention of domestic violence, and the survivor and batterer behavior.

Top

Draft, Amend & Update Food Law (1)
811E
This course provides an analysis of the steps required to draft, amend and update food laws and regulations from a global perspective. Students learn how stakeholders from varying constituencies impact global food laws and regulations; appropriate input from government agencies, the food industry, and consumers involved along the food supply chain; understanding of the role and resources available from international agencies in influencing food laws and regulations; and identification of the need for a new or amended law are discussed.
Prerequisite(s): This course intended for students in the Global Food Law program only.

Top