Skip to main content, skip to search, or skip to the top of the page.

Persuasion in Civil Rights Advocacy Symposium

Michigan State University College of Law
Call for Papers

Are you writing an article that addresses civil rights controversies from a perspective of persuasive methods in legal or social context? Are you looking for a venue for presentation and publication?

We are delighted to announce this call for papers for a symposium examining Persuasion in Civil Rights Advocacy. The symposium is scheduled for Friday and Saturday, April 10-11, 2015, at Michigan State University College of Law. It is sponsored by the Michigan State Law Review and conceived, coordinated, and co-sponsored by the Research, Writing, and Advocacy program of Michigan State University College of Law. Presenters will speak at the symposium and publish their papers in a special edition of the Michigan State Law Review.

Your presentation and paper should examine persuasive methods used by either side or both sides in civil rights disputes. Selections from responses to the call for papers will add to a lineup of already-confirmed presenters, including the following scholars:

Keynote – Erwin Chemerinsky: University of California, Irvine School of Law
Dean, Distinguished Professor of Law, and Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law

Linda Berger: University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law
Family Foundation Professor of Law
Topic: The Color-Blind Constitution: Unanticipated Consequences of Past Brief-Writing for Shaping Future Decisions Regarding Racial Classifications in Public Schools

Taimie Bryant: UCLA School of Law
Professor of Law

Charles Calleros: Arizona State University, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law
Professor of Law
Topic: Viewing Same-Sex Rights in the Context of the Evolution of Other Civil Rights

Nora Demleitner: Washington and Lee University School of Law
Dean, and Roy L. Steinheimer, Jr. Professor of Law

Linda Edwards: University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law
E.L. Cord Foundation Professor of Law
Topic: Hearing Voices: Legitimate Uses of Non-Party Narratives in Abortion and Gay Rights Litigation

David Favre: Michigan State University College of Law
The Nancy Heathcote Professor of Property and Animal Law
Topic: The Intertwining Logic and Emotion of Arguing for Chimpanzee Rights

Matthew Fletcher: Michigan State University College of Law
Professor of Law, Director of the Indigenous Law & Policy Center
Topic: Advocacy and Candor before the Court; Inter-Tribal Complications

David Frakt: Office of Military Commissions, Defense Counsel at Guantanamo
Topic: Representing Guantanamo Detainees

Luis Fuentes-Rohwer: University of Indiana, Maurer School of Law
Professor of Law, Harry T. Ice Faculty Fellow
Topic: Changing Conceptions of Racial Discrimination in Voting Rights

Rebecca Huss: Valparaiso University School of Law
Professor of Law, Michael and Dianne Swygert Research Fellow
Topic: A Conundrum For Animal Activists: Can or Should the Current Legal Classification of Certain Animals Be Utilized to Improve the Lives of All Animals?

Michael Olivas: University of Houston Law Center
William B. Bates Distinguished Chair of Law, and Director of Institute of Higher Education Law & Governance
Topic: Who Gets to Control Civil Rights Case Management?

Maria Ontiveros: University of San Francisco School of Law
Professor of Law
Topic: Workers’ Rights and the Language of Slavery

Ruth Anne Robbins: Rutgers University School of Law - Camden
Clinical Professor of Law
Topic: Right to Counsel at Domestic Violence Restraining Order Hearings: Working with Student-Written Amicus Briefs

Michelle Travis: University of San Francisco School of Law
Professor and Associate Dean for Faculty Scholarship
Topic: Disqualifying Universality under the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act

Pamela Wilkins: University of Detroit Mercy School of Law
Professor of Law, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Topic: Jury Instructions and Defense Arguments on Race Switching: What the Evidence Shows in Cross-Racial Criminal Cases

In addition, the Radicalism Collection of the Michigan State University Library will have an exhibition of pamphlets and other items.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, October 10, 2014, 5:00 PM Eastern Time. Michigan State Law Review anticipates notifying applicants in November, 2014 about acceptance of proposals for the April, 2015 symposium.

To submit a proposal for the symposium, please send the following items in a Word file e-mail attachment to William Cox, Senior Symposia Editor of the Michigan State Law Review, with the subject line “spring 2015 symposium.” His e-mail address is: cox.will05@gmail.com

  1. An abstract summarizing your article.
  2. A two-page excerpt from your article.
  3. An estimate of the anticipated final length of your article. Final papers should be equivalent in length to 20-60 typeset pages.
  4. A copy of your CV.
  5. An indication of whether your presentation would differ significantly from your article – such as whether the presentation would address only one particular section of a multi-section paper.

We look forward to receiving your submissions!

Questions can be directed to:
Bruce Ching
Assistant Clinical Professor
Michigan State University College of Law
chingbru@law.msu.edu


Skip to main content, skip to search, or skip to the top of the page.