MSU College of Law

Spring 2015 Schedule

(Updated: Tuesday, September 15, 2015 1:44 PM)

View schedule sorted by: Course Name, Date Modified, Groupings, Professor

Date key: M-Monday, T-Tuesday, W-Wednesday, R-Thursday, F-Friday

1st Year/Section 1
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Constitutional Law I / Morag-Levine, Nog.500C 001 97ENSZ M/10:30am-12:10pm 90 471 05-11-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 171) An introduction to American constitutional law. This course surveys the distribution of national powers among the Congress, the president and the federal judiciary. After examining the fundamentals of judicial review and its limitations, the course considers the delegated powers of Congress and the tensions between Congress and the president in the exercise of national powers. The course concludes with an overview of governmental immunities. Some sections of Regulatory State and constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
1 Contract Negotiation / Bedikian, Mar.530F 001 97ENTA T/1:30pm-3:10pm Jan 13 - Feb 24, 2015 80 474 No Exam,
This course introduces first-year students to principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in mock negotiation exercises.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts
3 Criminal Law / Totten, Mar.500F 001 97ENTJ TR/8:30am-9:45am 80 473 05-01-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 131) An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
4 Property / Favre, Dav.500G 001 97ENVH MWR/1:30pm-2:40pm 80 474 05-06-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 113) This is a survey course of the fundamentals of property law. Possessory interests of real and personal property including findings, bailments and adverse possession are discussed and analyzed. Topics also include future interests, concurrent ownership, lease holds, transfers of land and land use controls.
2 Regulatory State / Morag-Levine, Nog.530G 001 97ENVR W/10:30am-12:10pm 90 471 05-11-2015 1:30 PM
This course introduces students to the legal rules and principles governing the modern regulatory state, including statutory interpretation, justifications for regulation, how agencies implement their statutory mandates, and how courts review agency regulation and action. The course provides a foundation for upper-level courses in Legislation, Administrative Law, and a host of public law courses. Some sections of Regulatory State and Constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year/Section 2
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Constitutional Law I / Sant'Ambrogio, Mic.500C 002 97ENS2 T/10:30am-12:10pm 85 474 05-11-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 171) An introduction to American constitutional law. This course surveys the distribution of national powers among the Congress, the president and the federal judiciary. After examining the fundamentals of judicial review and its limitations, the course considers the delegated powers of Congress and the tensions between Congress and the president in the exercise of national powers. The course concludes with an overview of governmental immunities. Some sections of Regulatory State and constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
1 Contract Negotiation / Pappas, Bri.530F 002 97ENTB R/1:30pm-3:10pm Jan 15 - Feb 26, 2015 85 473 No Exam,
This course introduces first-year students to principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in mock negotiation exercises.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts
3 Criminal Law / O'Brien, Bar.500F 002 97ENTK MW/8:30am-9:45am 85 471 05-01-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 131) An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
4 Property / Carter-Johnson, Jen.500G 002 97ENVJ MW/1:30pm-3:10pm 90 473 05-06-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 113) This is a survey course of the fundamentals of property law. Possessory interests of real and personal property including findings, bailments and adverse possession are discussed and analyzed. Topics also include future interests, concurrent ownership, lease holds, transfers of land and land use controls.
2 Regulatory State / Sant'Ambrogio, Mic.530G 002 97ENVS R/10:30am-12:10pm 85 474 05-11-2015 1:30 PM
This course introduces students to the legal rules and principles governing the modern regulatory state, including statutory interpretation, justifications for regulation, how agencies implement their statutory mandates, and how courts review agency regulation and action. The course provides a foundation for upper-level courses in Legislation, Administrative Law, and a host of public law courses. Some sections of Regulatory State and Constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year/Section 3
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Constitutional Law I / Lawrence, Mic.500C 003 97ENS3 W/1:30pm-3:10pm 85 472 05-13-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 171) An introduction to American constitutional law. This course surveys the distribution of national powers among the Congress, the president and the federal judiciary. After examining the fundamentals of judicial review and its limitations, the course considers the delegated powers of Congress and the tensions between Congress and the president in the exercise of national powers. The course concludes with an overview of governmental immunities. Some sections of Regulatory State and constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
1 Contract Negotiation / Pappas, Bri.530F 003 97ENTC R/3:30pm-5:10pm Jan 15 - Feb 26, 2015 85 473 No Exam,
This course introduces first-year students to principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in mock negotiation exercises.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts
3 Criminal Law / Totten, Mar.500F 003 97ENTM TR/10:30am-11:45am 85 473 05-01-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 131) An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
4 Property / Bowman, Kri.500G 003 97ENVK MW/10:30am-12:10pm 85 473 05-06-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 113) This is a survey course of the fundamentals of property law. Possessory interests of real and personal property including findings, bailments and adverse possession are discussed and analyzed. Topics also include future interests, concurrent ownership, lease holds, transfers of land and land use controls.
2 Regulatory State / Chen, Jam.530G 003 97ENVT M/1:30pm-3:10pm 85 472 05-11-2015 8:30 AM
This course introduces students to the legal rules and principles governing the modern regulatory state, including statutory interpretation, justifications for regulation, how agencies implement their statutory mandates, and how courts review agency regulation and action. The course provides a foundation for upper-level courses in Legislation, Administrative Law, and a host of public law courses. Some sections of Regulatory State and Constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year Research and Writing
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Advocacy / Ching, Bru.530J 019 97ENY5 F/8:30am-10:10am 0 325 02-27-2015 11:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Costello, Nan.530J 006 97ENYP F/8:30am-10:10am 0 341 02-27-2015 11:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Gentry, Kev.530J 004 97ENYM F/8:30am-10:10am 0 335 02-27-2015 11:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Gulliver, Gar.530J 010 97ENYU F/8:30am-10:10am 0 345 02-27-2015 11:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / O'Regan, Dap.530J 007 97ENYR F/8:30am-10:10am 0 340 02-27-2015 11:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Lawrence, Dea.530J 005 97ENYN F/8:30am-10:10am 0 344 02-27-2015 11:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Stokstad, Pau.530J 012 97ENYW F/10:30am-12:10pm 0 345 02-27-2015 2:00 PM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Ching, Bru.530J 020 97ENY6 F/10:30am-12:10pm 0 325 02-27-2015 2:00 PM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / LaRose, Ste.530J 015 97ENYZ F/10:30am-12:10pm 0 341 02-27-2015 2:00 PM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Spiliopoulos, Ela.530J 017 97ENY3 F/10:30am-12:10pm 0 335 02-27-2015 2:00 PM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Rosa, Jen.530J 014 97ENYY F/10:30am-12:10pm 0 344 02-27-2015 2:00 PM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / O'Regan, Dap.530J 008 97ENYS F/10:30am-12:10pm 0 340 02-27-2015 2:00 PM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Goebel, Eli.530J 009 97ENYT F/10:30am-12:10pm 0 346 02-27-2015 2:00 PM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Stokstad, Pau.530J 013 97ENYX F/1:30pm-3:10pm 0 345 02-27-2015 9:00 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / LaRose, Ste.530J 016 97ENY2 F/1:30pm-3:10pm 0 341 02-27-2015 9:00 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Gulliver, Gar.530J 011 97ENYV F/1:30pm-3:10pm 0 344 02-27-2015 9:00 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Advocacy / Copland, Jen.530J 018 97ENY4 W/3:30pm-5:10pm 0 335 02-27-2015 9:00 AM
(Formerly LAW500K) Students learn the art of persuasive argumentation by drafting a 30-page appellate brief on a topical legal issue, complying with appellate court rules and then presenting a simulated oral argument to members of the bench. During the semester, students also attend appellate arguments or trial court motion sessions and prepare brief synopses of cases heard. Prerequisite: Research, Writing and Analysis, OR Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I, OR Research, Writing and Advocacy I: Intellectual Property Perspective.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing & Analysis
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Upper Level Required
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Professional Responsibility / Brown, Tro.500Q 001 97ENWX TR/3:30pm-4:45pm 90 474 04-30-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 260) A course designed to acquaint the law student with many of the obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives. In addition to a discussion of ethical problems involved in the practice of law, an overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students who have already taken Lawyer Regulation and Ethics in a Technology-Driven World may not take this course.
2 Regulatory State / Candeub, Ada.530G 004 97ENVU M/1:30pm-3:10pm This section for transfer students only. 45 345 05-05-2015 1:30 PM
This course introduces students to the legal rules and principles governing the modern regulatory state, including statutory interpretation, justifications for regulation, how agencies implement their statutory mandates, and how courts review agency regulation and action. The course provides a foundation for upper-level courses in Legislation, Administrative Law, and a host of public law courses. Some sections of Regulatory State and Constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Electives
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Accounting for Lawyers / Lameti, Ric.502 301 97ENR7 R/5:45pm-7:25pm 50 346 05-05-2015 6:00 PM S
(Formerly DCL 508) Accounting for Lawyers covers the basic topics in accounting that are relevant to a business lawyer's practice and to other practice areas as well. The class covers principles of double-entry bookkeeping and accrual accounting, GAAP and GAAS. The basic financial statements are studied and basic financial statement analysis is reviewed. More detailed analysis is made of revenue recognition and expense, contingencies and intangibles. Finally, drafting of legal documents using accounting concepts is explored. This course is designed for those students with little or no prior accounting training or experience.
3 Administrative Law / Kalt, Bri.532 001 97ENR8 MW/3:30pm-4:45pm 90 471 05-04-2015 1:30 PM
Formerly DCL 300) This course examines the place of administrative agencies in American government, and surveys the legal rules and principles governing agency regulation, adjudication, investigation, and enforcement; agency structure; and judicial review of agency action.
3 Advanced Corporate Law / Walther, Ben.508D 001 97ENTG TR/4:00pm-5:15pm 20 341 Final Paper, U
(Formerly Corporate Law and Policy Seminar) This advanced seminar in corporate law will cover one or more practice areas of contemporary importance. Past or planned topics include private equity, corporate speech and political activity, and investor conflicts. The course will attempt a thorough treatment of relevant positive law, and address positive and normative issues of corporate regulation by courts and policy makers. Students will also be expected to engage with the economic, financial and business issues which every successful corporate practitioner should understand. The materials will consist of cases, statutes, scholarly articles, policy proposals and other readings. There are no formal prerequisites, but students are strongly advised to have taken a course in corporate law or corporate governance. The seminar may quickly dive into concepts that will be difficult to understand without some familiarity with corporate law principles.
2 Advanced Legal Research / Bean, Bar. & Meland, Jan.586 001 97ENSA R/1:30pm-3:10pm 24 340 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
2 Advanced Topics in Indian Law: Tribal Law / Fletcher, Mat.635A 001 97ENSC M/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 341 Final Paper, U
This course provides in-depth coverage of the laws of American Indian nations, including tribal court jurisprudence and practice, tribal constitutional law, tribal economic development, and tribal customary and traditional law.
Prerequisite(s): Federal Law and Indian Tribes
2 Agricultural Law / Deacon, Bra.566N 301 97ENSD W/5:45pm-7:25pm 20 335 Final Paper,
Students will learn about the regulatory framework of the food and agriculture sector at the federal, state, and local levels and how the application of this framework impacts all citizens. This includes the production, processing, and distribution of food, fiber, and other products that make up a large portion of the economies of the nation and the State of Michigan. Students will learn about the origins and impacts of these regulatory components and how evolving trends and public opinion are changing the food and agriculture sector
1 Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Game Theory / Biddle, Jef.637D 001 97ENSH MW/3:30pm-4:45pm Jan 12 - Feb 16, 2015 24 340 02-23-2015 3:30 PM
(NEW course as of Spring 2006) Condensed principles of game theory to serve as a primer that provides law students the tools necessary to succeed as 'lawyers' in the various legal fields that use these principles.
3 Animal Law / Favre, Dav.565A 001 97ENSJ TR/4:00pm-5:15pm 17 344 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 501) A survey of animal legal issues including property status, zoning and criminal anti-cruelty laws. Additionally, legal policy issues will be discussed, such as what to do with dangerous dogs, and what level of animal welfare should be provided to agricultural animals. The distinction between animal welfare and animal rights will be considered.
2 Arbitration (Labor) / Roumell, Geo.505B 301 97ENSM M/7:45pm-9:25pm 40 345 Take Home Exam, S
The study of current thinking of arbitrators interpreting collective bargaining agreements including techniques of opinion writing and advocacy before labor arbitrators. The course focuses on collective bargaining agreements, whether an issue is subject to arbitration, timelines for filing an arbitration, the burden of proof, quantum of proof, the concept of discipline and just cause, as well as contract interpretation. Students will participate in mock trials and will be responsible for drafting an arbitration opinion as a class assignment.
3 Basic Income Taxation B / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.501B 001 97ENSN MW/3:30pm-4:45pm 90 473 05-04-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 250) Like Basic Income Taxation A, this course introduces the basic concepts of federal income taxation. Basic Income Taxation B, however, goes beyond a survey course by a rigorous examination of technical tax issues, including a focus on solving complex tax problems. This course is ideal for students interested in pursuing legal practice in the tax or business fields. Students will be exposed to the same topics covered in Basic Income Taxation A, but will also study additional topics. Topics likely to be covered include: business and profit-seeking expenditures, capital expenditures, depreciation, the home-office deduction, tax planning for divorce, non-recourse debt, including issues relating to basis and amount realized, and anti-tax abuse provisions limiting tax shelters, including at-risk rules and active participation requirements. In resolving problems, students will have ample opportunity to develop facility in interpreting complex statutes and in applying law from various additional sources. Moreover, the themes studied will allow students to understand that tax legislation is a dynamic process in which the law evolves as a result of taxpayers devising new strategies and from policymakers' responses.
Prerequisite(s): Students that enroll in Basic Income Taxation B are ineligible to enroll in Basic Income Taxation or Basic Income Taxation A.
3 Basic Will Drafting / Behan, Mic.540A 001 97ENSP MW/8:00am-9:15am 24 340 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 391) This course is designed to familiarize students with the interviewing function and the drafting of wills and other basic estate planning vehicles for clients whose estates are not subject to federal estate tax. An evaluation of usable forms and discussion of when and how to use them intelligently will be a focus of the course. A client interview and drafting exercises, including an entire basic estate plan, are contemplated.
Prerequisite(s): Decedents' Estates and Trusts
4 Business Enterprises / Bean, Bru.500M 001 97ENSR TR/1:30pm-3:10pm 50 346 05-12-2015 8:30 AM
This course deals with issues relating to common forms of business organization, including corporations, limited liability companies and closely held corporations. The four credit version of Business Enterprises also includes an introduction to mergers and acquisitions.
4 Business Enterprises / Bean, Bru.500M 002 97ENSS TR/10:30am-12:10pm 90 472 05-12-2015 8:30 AM
This course deals with issues relating to common forms of business organization, including corporations, limited liability companies and closely held corporations. The four credit version of Business Enterprises also includes an introduction to mergers and acquisitions.
3 Capital Punishment / Grosso, Cat.579Y 001 97ENST MW/1:30pm-2:45pm 20 340 Final Paper, Take Home Exam, U
A focus on federal constitutional law, primarily the 8th Amendment and its regulation of capital punishment. The federal constitutional law largely regulates state criminal law. Using the 8th Amendment and state criminal laws, the course will consider how death eligibility is defined and administered. It will explore the limits imposed by the Constitution and by various state and federal statutes. The course also will consider larger questions including, Why have the death penalty? Is the system working? Is it necessary? Is it fair? What changes should be made? As part of this inquiry we will consider the role of race in capital punishment, the impact of wrongful convictions, and recent moves to abolish or limit capital punishment in several jurisdictions. The course also examines the law of federal habeas corpus in the context of the death penalty. This section engages in a close reading of a complicated set of statutes, as well as the Supreme Court decisions construing those statutes.
2 Child Advocacy / Beaton, H. .541A 301 97ENSU W/5:45pm-7:25pm 24 340 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 446) This class is designed to acquaint future attorneys and social workers with their unique roles and responsibilities in representing and advocating for children and families as they interact with the state government: its departments, agencies, laws and rules.
3 Civil Trial Advocacy I / Young, Rob.587B 001 97ENSW M/4:00pm-6:55pm 1-12-15 to 4-13-15 Enrollment by application only. Contact Dean Thronson for details 12 428/430 No Exam, P S
(Formerly DCL 472) Evidence may be taken concurrently with Advocacy I, but extra preparation may be necessary. Advocacy I begins your journey into civil trial practice. Using a circuit court forum and the Michigan Court Rules, we will explore discovery in the context of a typical case from the filing of a complaint to the first day of trial. Students will draft complaints, answers and affirmative defenses, propound written discovery, take fact and expert depositions, prepare and argue motions and mediation, and prepare for trial. There will be role-play as plaintiff or defense counsel. The final grade is a compilation of oral in-class performance and participation, and written assignments. Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
2 Client Counseling and Interviewing / Smith, Sam.591A 001 97ENSX R/4:00pm-5:40pm 16 335 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 450) This course adopts a client-centered approach in looking at legal problems and examines how to make clients partners in problem solving. Attention is paid to the economic, social and psychological aspects of clients' legal problems. The course starts with an examination of fundamental counseling skills, followed by an analysis of the information gathering process and ultimate decision making. Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Evidence
2 Closely- Held Business: Shareholder and Member Disputes / Sartori, Lee.593J 301 97ENSY R/5:45pm-7:25pm 16 341 Final Paper, S
This course will examine the common problems, issues, actions, and defenses associated with closely-held business owner's disputes in both a corporate and limited liability company context utilizing Michigan Law as an example. The course will review these problems and issues from an owner's perspective as well as from the business's perspective. This course is designed for those students desiring to become transactional business attorneys to give those students a working knowledge of the basics of this area of the law so that they may consult with business owners both before and after disputes arise, provide strategic and interpretive support to litigation attorneys in the advent of litigation amongst owners, and draft appropriate entity governance documents. A segment of the course will also discuss measures and actions that may be taken to prevent, minimize, or discourage disputes. This will be an interdisciplinary course where students will be able to use concepts of tort, contract, real estate, corporate, limited liability company, employment, tax and potentially many other areas of law. Classroom panel discussions based on actual Michigan case complaints and a final paper will be required in lieu of a final examination.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
3 Commercial Arbitration / Bedikian, Mar.505A 001 97ENSK TR/10:30am-11:45am 40 345 Take Home Exam, S
(Formerly Arbitration) A course dealing with all aspects of arbitrating disputes under collective bargaining agreements, including judicial review of arbitration procedures and analyses of the concepts applied by arbitrators in reaching their respective decisions. Students will have an opportunity to observe an actual arbitration in process and participate as an advocate in a mock arbitration.
Prerequisite(s): Evidence
2 Comparative Free Expression / Saunders, Kev.549D 001 97ENV6 M/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 344 Final Paper, U
This course may be taught in either a lecture or seminar format. When taught as a lecture course it is case based. A number of topics in free expression are examined to see how they are differently treated in various democratic states. When taught as a seminar, there will be readings that will be discussed as a class in the first half of the course. Students will also research a topic involving free expression and its treatment in selected countries. In the second half of the course, papers the students develop will be presented to the class.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Constitutional Law I, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
4 Constitutional Law II / Kuykendall, Mae.500N 301 97ENS5 MW/5:45pm-7:25pm 90 474 05-07-2015 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 172) A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
4 Constitutional Law II / Bitensky, Sus.500N 001 97ENS4 TR/1:30pm-3:10pm 90 471 05-08-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 172) A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
3 Constitutional Litigation / Pucillo, Phi.579X 001 97ENS7 MW/3:30pm-4:45pm 60 474 05-04-2015 8:30 AM
This course provides a rigorous examination of the intricacies initiated by individuals seeking to vindicate federal constitutional rights. Primary emphasis will be placed on suits under 42 U.S.C §1983 against state and local governmental entities and their officials. Through a careful study of the many doctrines that the U.S. Supreme Court has pronounced and developed in connection with litigation under 42 U.S.C. § 1983 and Bivens, students will gain a significant understanding of and appreciation for the challenges that confront a constitutional claimant both in establishing liability and in obtaining a remedy. In particular, the course will focus on the essential elements of a § 1983 action, such as the requirement that the defendant have acted “under color of” state or local law, as well as the need to demonstrate that the constitutional violation at issue flowed from an official policy or custom in cases where the defendant is a municipality. There will also be substantial treatment of the various defenses that officials sued in their individual capacity may assert, including absolute immunity (available to those who perform legislative, judicial, and prosecutorial functions), qualified immunity, and res judicata. In addition, the availability of remedies such as damages, injunctive relief, and attorney fees will be explored.
2 Consumer Law / Ard, Jos.593G 301 97ENS8 T/5:45pm-7:25pm 30 346 05-06-2015 6:00 PM
This course examines special requirements for consumer transactions. It includes deception in the marketplace, including many disclosure requirements; credit (discrimination, accuracy, and other limitations),; debt collection practices; and consumer remedies. Both federal and state laws will be covered. One focus will be how these requirements supersede normal contract, tort, and property laws. Civil, administrative, and criminal actions will be addressed.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II, Property, Torts I
2 Contract Drafting / Lawrence, Dea.594A 001 97ENS9 R/8:30am-10:10am 16 340 No Exam, S
The specific purpose of this class is to use contract principles that the student has learned in the first year as a vehicle to develop the student's abilities as a planner and counselor. It will involve the study of some of the common pitfalls encountered in contract drafting and called upon to perform specific exercises in which the student will use her/his basic knowledge of contracts to draft various documents. In the course of the drafting, the student will be required to predict what may happen, provide for that contingency and attempt to protect the client.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts
3 Copyright Law / Pager, Sea.533B 001 97ENTD MW/3:30pm-4:45pm 40 345 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 375) According to Article 1, Section 8, Clause 8 of the U.S. Constitution, Congress has the power to promote the "progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries." Congress has adopted copyright statutes to protect forms of expression, which include computer software. This course will explore the history of copyright protection, with a particular emphasis on entertainment litigation.
3 Corporate Finance / Spoon, Ell.508B 001 97ENTE MW/1:30pm-2:45pm 50 346 05-05-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 380) In Corporate Finance the principles of accounting and valuation and the basic financial environment of closely held companies and public companies will be examined. Building on this foundation, the fundamental issues surrounding common stock, preferred stock and debt will be analyzed. Finally, all these fundamentals will be applied in examining financial issues with mergers and acquisitions and tender offers and in understanding how "deals" are done. Students who have not taken Business Enterprises are permitted to enroll in this course if they are simultaneously enrolled in Business Enterprises.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
2 Corporate Governance and Compliance / Hall, Cur.508F 301 97ENTH T/5:45pm-7:25pm 20 344 05-06-2015 6:00 PM
(Formerly Corporate Law and Policy: Corporate Governance and Compliance) A survey of issues in corporate governance and compliance in light of the legal risks faced by corporations and corporate directors and officers in the legal environment presented by securities law, antitrust, tort law, environmental law, and other sources of liability. Specific topics include risk management, Section 404 of Sarbanes-Oxley, internal compliance programs, and corporate codes of conduct and codes of behavior.
3 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication / Kaplan, Ste.616C 001 97ENTR R/5:00pm-7:30pm 90 471 05-05-2015 6:00 PM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure II) This course examines various issues associated with criminal adjudications with a focus on federal constitutional rights. The course covers issues such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, bail and pretrial detention, discovery, the plea bargaining process, speedy trial rights, federal sentencing guidelines, and post-conviction review. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Criminal Procedure: Investigation in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure II are ineligible to enroll in this course.
3 Criminal Procedure: Investigation / Candeub, Ada.616B 001 97ENTS MW/8:30am-9:45am 90 473 05-08-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
3 Criminal Procedure: Investigation / Katz, Dan.616B 002 97ENTT MW/3:30pm-4:45pm 90 472 05-04-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
2 Criminal Trial Advocacy Post-Conviction Remedies / Scullion, Mar.617C 001 97ENTV T/4:00pm-5:40pm 20 335 No Exam, S
(Formerly Criminal Trial Advocacy III Post-Conviction Remedies) This course focuses on the representation issues raised during the critical stage of sentencing. The following topics are covered: duties/function of counsel, statutes, types of sentencing, indeterminate sentencing, length, sentencing plan, credit for time served, concurrent/consecutive, PSIs, considerations, habitual offender, altering sentences, probation, violations, restitution, alternatives, plea bargaining, guilty pleas, Proposal B, good time); sentencing guidelines demonstration; post-conviction motions; criminal appeals; parole; habeas corpus, state and federal; prisoners' rights; and sentencing reform/capital punishment. Criminal Trial Advocacy classes are not sequential and may be taken in any order.
2 Current Issues in Securities Regulation / Makens, Hug. & Meurlin, Cra.524C 001 97ENTW W/1:30pm-3:10pm 30 345 Final Paper, U
(Formerly LAW 503) This course will address current issues in securities regulation including: evolving market structures; broker-dealer regulation and inter-relationships with brokerage firms, issuers and customers; investment adviser regulation; advanced issues in private placement; recent developments in SEC investigations, enforcement proceedings and related criminal actions; public company regulation; and professional obligations for attorneys and accountants.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
3 Decedents' Estates and Trusts / Jacobs, Mel.501D 002 97ENTY TR/10:30am-11:45am 90 471 05-01-2015 1:30 PM
Effective fall 2016 name changed to Trusts and Estates. A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
3 Decedents' Estates and Trusts / Ten Brink, Cha.501D 001 97ENTX TR/3:30pm-4:45pm 90 471 05-11-2015 8:30 AM
Effective fall 2016 name changed to Trusts and Estates. A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
3 Environmental Law / Morag-Levine, Nog.566A 001 97ENTZ MW/1:30pm-2:45pm 40 325 05-05-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 323) This course provides an introduction to the legal principles, institutions, and policy debates central to American environmental regulation. The course begins with an overview of economical and ethical justifications for environmental regulation, historical and contemporary common-law-based approaches to environmental problems, and the evolution of federal environmental law. Next the course surveys the regulatory programs enacted under major environmental statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Air Act (CAA), the Clean Water Act (CWA), the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The course will focus in this connection on differences in the statutory criteria used to determine the stringency of regulation (risk-based, technology-based, and cost-benefit standards), and the choice between direct regulation and economic-incentive-based means of meeting environmental goals. Finally, discussion will turn to the challenges of environmental enforcement, and the role of agencies, courts and citizens groups in the implementation of environmental law.
2 Estate Planning and Drafting Seminar / Schweitzer, Law.540B 301 97ENT2 T/5:45pm-7:25pm 20 341 No Exam,
(Formerly DCL 482) This course focuses on the impact of federal estate, gift and generation-skipping transfer taxes on will and trust drafting. Various aspects of Michigan law and state tax issues also will be covered. There will be several drafting assignments as well as a paper analyzing and making recommendations concerning a complex estate planning problem. EITHER Basic Income Tax A OR Basic Income Tax B fulfills the prerequisite, along with Property and Decedents' Estates and Trusts.
Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation A, Basic Income Taxation B, Decedents' Estates and Trusts, Property
3 European Union Law / Reifenberg, Jr., Joh.548C 001 97ENT3 TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 30 325 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 447) This course provides an introduction to the legal institutions of the European Economic Community. The subjects covered include the Treaty of Rome and other relevant legal instruments, the major institutions and characteristics of community law, internal community policies, external trade policies, competition law and the future of the community. A student may not take both this and Constitutional Law of the European Union.
3 Evidence / Pucillo, Phi.500P 001 97ENT5 MW/10:30am-11:45am 90 472 05-06-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 220) A study of the means and methods of proof or disproof of a proposition as either permitted, required or prohibited under the Anglo-American system of jurisprudence. The rules respecting problems of remoteness and prejudice of evidence, circumstantial proof, the employment of writings, their authentication and proof of their contents. A study in depth of hearsay evidence and its status in the evidence. A thorough inquiry into the so-called "evidential preferences" of our legal system and the deficiencies of hearsay evidence as related to these preferences.
3 Family Law: Marriage & Divorce / Starnes, Cyn.541E 001 97ENT6 TR/3:30pm-4:45pm 90 472 05-07-2015 8:30 AM S
(Formerly Family Law I: Marriage & Divorce) This course examines laws governing entry into marriage, access to divorce, the economics of divorce (property distribution, alimony and child support), child custody, premarital agreements, and cohabitation. Students may take Family Law: Marriage & Divorce and Family Law: Child, Family, and State in any order or at the same time.
3 Family Law: Marriage & Divorce / Starnes, Cyn.541E 002 97ENT7 TR/10:30am-11:45am 50 346 05-07-2015 8:30 AM S
(Formerly Family Law I: Marriage & Divorce) This course examines laws governing entry into marriage, access to divorce, the economics of divorce (property distribution, alimony and child support), child custody, premarital agreements, and cohabitation. Students may take Family Law: Marriage & Divorce and Family Law: Child, Family, and State in any order or at the same time.
2 Federal Investigation and Prosecution / Schneider, Mat.616E 301 97ENT9 M/5:45pm-7:25pm 30 325 Final Paper,
Students will be introduced to nearly all aspects of federal criminal investigation, including identifying crimes, analyzing constitutional requirements, using a Grand Jury, dealing with cooperators and informants, engaging in undercover operations, using electronic surveillance, choosing the correct charging procedure, obtaining search and arrest warrants, and managing ethical obligations in an investigation. Students will learn how to apply the evidence obtained from an investigation in a federal prosecution. Students will learn how to analyze complex statues, argue a detention hearing, engage in plea negotiations, apply the federal sentencing guidelines, advocate at trial and sentencing, and manage ethical obligations in a prosecution.
Prerequisite(s): Criminal Procedure I
3 Global Law Colloquium / Mansour, Sam.545D 001 97ENUE T/3:30pm-6:00pm 1/13; 1/20; 2/24; 3/3; 3/24; 3/31; 4/7 12 345 Final Paper, U
This course offers a broad overview of key, contemporary international legal issues which will be presented by JD and LL.M. students. Students will read and comment upon student papers and presentations. Students will be evaluated on their presentations and abstracts of their topic. Students participating in the Colloquium for 3 credits through a Directed Study will be evaluated primarily on their research paper.
1 Global Law Colloquium / Mansour, Sam.545D 002 97ENUF T/3:30pm-6:00pm 1/13; 1/20; 2/24; 3/3; 3/24; 3/31; 4/7 10 345 No Exam,
This course offers a broad overview of key, contemporary international legal issues which will be presented by JD and LL.M. students. Students will read and comment upon student papers and presentations. Students will be evaluated on their presentations and abstracts of their topic. Students participating in the Colloquium for 3 credits through a Directed Study will be evaluated primarily on their research paper.
3 Global Perspectives on Education Law / Bowman, Kri.545E 001 97ENUG M/12:40pm-3:10pm 18 EH 132 Final Paper, P U
This course addresses a specific topic within the broader topic of public international human rights law: education. Countries around the world as well as prominent international treaties and covenants recognize that children have a right to education. The potential benefits of education are many: arguably, it can support the development of stable government, reduce inequalities among groups of people, promote individual economic well-being, contribute to overall economic development of societies, and ultimately help enable countries to become more powerful on the global stage. Law is regularly used by nation-states and by regional and global international bodies as a lever to advance these goals. Thus, this course will consider a range of international and comparative legal and policy choices.
2 Global Perspectives on Women in Law / Brenner, Han.541Q 001 97ENUH W/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 344 Final Paper, U
This seminar will consider international dimensions of gender and the legal profession, including an examination of history, employment trends, practices and demographics within all sectors of the profession (the judiciary, private practice, the corporate world, academia and public service). The seminar will explore explanations of inequality - like bias and stereotypes - and will consider other obstacles that have impeded the advancement of women in the profession across continents. Biographical material on transformative women lawyers will also be included.
2 Health Care Fraud and Abuse / Kaser, Bri.558J 001 97ENUJ R/8:30am-10:10am 15 335 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 594) The course will cover federal and state laws that impose criminal and civil penalties on health care providers for a variety of activities, ranging from payment for referrals to the submissions of false claims. The course would cover the federal and state illegal remuneration statutes, the federal civil monetary penalty and exclusion laws, the federal anti-referral (Stark) law, and the federal false claims laws as they apply to the health care industry.
2 Housing Law and the Public Interest / Gilmore, Bri.603B 001 97ENUK T/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 344 Final Paper,
This is an introductory course that focuses on the significant laws, cases and policies formulated in the 21st century to address housing issues in the United States. The focus is on laws that were a response to economic, racial, and immigration issues and laws and policies designed to provide more access and opportunity to obtain safe, fair, and affordable housing. The course will examine legal and policy areas relating to housing and the problem of providing housing to the population in an effort to bring the issue of a society providing housing for its citizens full circle.
2 Immigration Consequences of Crime / Kloet, Joa.541T 301 97EN54 T/5:45pm-7:25pm 20 340 No Exam,
This course will examine the immigration consequences of criminal activity through analysis of statutes, regulations, case law, and official federal agency publications. Students will gain the knowledge needed to identify, analyze, and provide advice and counsel with regard to substantive and procedural immigration and naturalization issues that arise from criminal law matters.
3 Indigenous Law and Policy Center / Fort, Kat.630F 001 97FPPX Arranged 3 No Exam, P S
(Formerly DCL 625) This experiential learning course addresses the issues involved in creating and operating tribal judiciaries, and the federal, state, and tribal tax laws that affect tribal governance. Students learn about the appellate process in tribal court systems, including preparation of bench memoranda for pending cases in tribal appellate courts. Students also have the opportunity to assist in developing tribal court structures and improving tribal court administration. In addition, students assist in drafting tribal tax codes, creating administrative tax tribunals, and handling tax controversies for qualifying clients. Other projects may include legislative and policy work for tribal governments, including drafting and revising tribal laws and providing legal assistance regarding land tenure systems.
1 Intellectual Property Practicum / Falcoff, Mon.535F 301 97ENUM R/7:45pm-9:25pm Mar 5 - April 23, 2015 20 344 No Exam,
This class will revolve around the skills that young intellectual property attorneys are often forced to learn on the job while in practice as taught by practicing attorneys. Classes may involve lecture or class exercises as the topic dictates. The focus of the practicum will vary depending on practicing attorney availability. Assignments will encompass many types of topic-appropriate readings, including cases, practitioner guides, and CLE materials. Students are recommended to have taken either Patent Law, Intellectual Property Survey, or Patent Application Drafting.
Prerequisite(s): Patent Law or Intellectual Property Survey or Patent Application Preparation
2 International Human Rights / Bitensky, Sus.548F 001 97ENUS R/4:00pm-5:40pm 40 325 05-11-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerlty DCL 418) This course explores human rights and the international legal order, background, concepts and the future. It will also consider major international agreements and their relation to local law, and remedies for the implementation of human rights.
2 International Intellectual Property Law / Pager, Sea.533E 001 97ENUT M/10:30am-12:10pm 20 341 Final Paper,
International Intellectual Property Law begins with overview of the purposes of intellectual property under U.S. law, then looks at rapidly developing treaty regimes, reciprocal international legislation particularly focusing on patent law, and international cases for the protection of scientific invention and ownership issues in the global markets that affect the rights of authors and inventors. Some attention will also focus on United States export control laws.
1 Introduction to Islamic Law / Khalil, Moh.545F 001 97ENUU T/4:00pm-5:40pm Jan 13 - Feb 24, 2015 30 325 03-03-2015 3:30 PM
The study of Islamic legal philosophy and the historical evolution of Islamic legal and jurisprudential systems that will include origins, nature, sources, and interpretive methodologies of classical Islamic law, and the main institution for upholding this law, the madhhab, or school of law, examining its development from the formative to the post-formative periods and highlighting important controversies generated along the way; Early encounter of Islamic law with modernity; and Exploration of several contemporary topics that have served as catalysts for new tensions and alternative approaches and interpretive theories.
3 Juvenile Law / Darden, Tif.541K 001 97ENUV MW/10:30am-11:45am 20 324 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 378) A survey of the law related to juvenile courts in the areas of delinquency and child neglect, including jurisdiction and waivers thereof, arrest, pre-trial, and trial procedure and disposition.
2 King Scholars Seminar / Saunders, Kev.626D 001 97ENUW W/3:30pm-5:10pm 20 341 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 404) Students who have a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Senior Paper course in their last regular semester at the Law College.
Prerequisite(s): King Scholars Jurisprudence
2 Land Use Planning / Ten Brink, Cha.566B 001 97ENUX M/3:30pm-5:10pm 25 346 05-04-2015 6:00 PM S
(Formerly DCL 401) THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS. Explores the principal methods of local government control of land use, with special emphasis on the theory and practice of zoning and eminent domain. Analyzes judicial response, through the use of nuisance and "takings" doctrines, to local land use planning efforts.
Prerequisite(s): Property
3 Law and Economics / Mercuro, Nic.515 001 97ENUY MW/4:00pm-5:15pm 30 324 05-04-2015 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 443) Law and Economics, (alternatively named "the economics of legal relationships" or perhaps more accurately, "the economic analysis of law") is defined as the application of economic theory – primarily microeconomics and the basic concepts of welfare economics – to examine the formation, structure, processes, and the economic impact of law and legal institutions. The purpose of this course is to: (1) provide a brief review of microeconomic theory sufficient to (2) undertake a survey (the history, the people, and their ideas) of the dominant schools of thought that comprise the field of Law and Economics including i) the Chicago approach to law and economics, ii) the New Haven school, iii) public choice theory, iv) social norms and Law and Economics, v) Austrian law and economics, vi) institutional law and economics, and vii) the new institutional economics. Each of these schools of thought places a significant emphasis on the interrelations between law and economy. The goal is to have you understand the jurisprudential niche occupied by these several schools of thought and their impact on present-day legal scholarship... to get a sense of the “lay of the land;” no attempt is made to critique the schools or the ideas contained therein. The materials covered in this class are of fundamental importance not only for those working in the fields of economics and law, but also to those in the contiguous disciplines of political science, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. Prerequisite: an understanding of the principles of microeconomics.
Prerequisite(s): After taking this course, students may not take Analytical Methods for Lawyers - Microeconomics (509A), nor may they be taken concurrently.
2 Law and Interpretation / Ravitch, Fra.579R 001 97ENU2 W/10:30am-12:10pm 40 345 Take Home Exam,
This course will explore the ways in which judges and other legal actors interpret the law. Anyone who has studied law for even a short period of time quickly becomes aware that there are a variety of legal and jurisprudential tools that judges can use in interpreting the law. In this course we will explore the various tools judges use in interpreting cases, as well as a number of the theoretical schools that influence or help us understand judicial decision-making. We will do this by analyzing cases and by studying the various tools/theories relevant to legal interpretation. The course will cover legal interpretation in the contexts of constitutional, statutory, and common law. The hope is to look underneath the cases and try to understand how great legal minds (judges, lawyers, and scholars) can look at the same or similar facts and law, yet reach significantly varied interpretative results.
3 Law and Religion / Ravitch, Fra.579K 001 97ENU3 MW/3:30pm-4:45pm 40 325 05-04-2015 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 530) This course will focus on church/state law -- the legal doctrines that have arisen in cases under the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. The course will explore the role of law in various religious traditions and the role of religion in law and public discourse. Topics addressed include school prayer, government aid to religious institutions (including school vouchers and charitable choice), government endorsement of religious symbols, the role of public forum doctrine in religion cases, freedom of religious expression, and the freedom to practice one's religion.
1-6 Law Review / Barnhizer, Dan.628 001 97FRCR Arranged 70 No Exam, P U
(Formerly DCL 790) Prerequisites: RWA I and II, credits completed and GPA Participation is by invitation or writing competition upon satisfactory completion by full-time students of two full semesters and by part-time students of three full semesters. Four semester hours of ungraded credit earned upon successful completion of a casenote, a comment and all required production work.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
1 Legal Analysis, Practice Application and Writing / Dinan, Tim.600B 001 97ENU4 BAR PREP COURSE S/1:00pm-4:00pm Jan 24, 31, Feb 21, 28, Mar 21, (Apr 11 make-up session) 80 474 No Exam,
The course format focuses on teaching analysis and writing skills for answering Multistate Essay Exam (MEE) questions and drafting legal documents for the Multistate Performance Test (MPT). Students will work on the skills necessary to organize and present answers to maximize points awarded by the examiners. Students will do simulation questions with answers graded by former bar exam graders. Additionally, random student answers will be critiqued with the class to identify strengths and weaknesses. The course is recommended to students taking the bar exam where both exams are administered (e.g., Illinois, Colorado, District of Columbia Missouri, Utah and Wisconsin). It will also be helpful to students taking the bar exam where the MPT is administered (e.g., New York, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Georgia, Indiana, Maryland, Minnesota, and Nevada). Attendance and participation in all sessions is required to obtain credit for the course. Only graduating third year students are eligible to enroll in this course.
2 Legal Analytics / Bommarito, Mic. & Katz, Dan.537N 001 97ENU5 M/10:30am-12:10pm 40 345 No Exam,
This course is designed to train students to efficiently manage, collect, explore and analyze various forms of legal data. Its purpose is to imbue students with the capability to:(1) understand the process of extracting knowledge from data with specific applications to domains such as legal prediction; (2) distinguish themselves in legal proceedings involving data or analysis;(3) distinguish themselves in firm management matters;(4) understand and communicate with information and software sector clients; and(5) use data to manage outside resources such as LPO or eDiscovery providers.Students will be introduced to sophisticated statistical techniques including machine learning and natural language processing.
Prerequisite(s): Quantitative Analysis for Lawyers (637E) or with professor permission alternative prior experience with data/statistics.
2 Legal Issues with Energy Development and Wildlife / Bambery, Car.565C 001 97EN5P M/8:00am-9:40am 20 325 Final Paper,
This course will explore emerging issues in energy law and policy that relate to fish and wildlife.
2 Litigation: Data, Theory, Practice, Process / Katz, Dan. & Linna Jr., Dan.537M 001 97EN55 W/10:30am-12:10pm 40 346 No Exam, S
The primary goal of this class is for students to learn how to leverage data, theory, and process to obtain better results in litigation. Students will explore sources of data and the use of decision theory, game theory, and economic analysis to evaluate claims, predict outcomes, and improve litigation strategies. The litigation process will be deconstructed beyond the mechanics of procedural rules and into the specific tasks lawyers must perform. Deconstructing the litigation process allows lawyers to properly staff matters, complete tasks more efficiently, and demonstrate the marginal return on investment for each task. Students will also learn a number of practical skills necessary to be an effective litigator. Among the topics addressed are early case assessment, client counseling, settlement negotiations, drafting persuasive pleadings and motions, managing discovery, persuading the fact finder, managing litigation projects, budgeting, and developing effective value-added litigation strategies.
3 Mergers and Acquisitions / Walther, Ben.516 001 97ENU7 TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 40 345 No Exam,
(Formerly DCL 505) Overview of issues relating to business combinations. The course includes a transactional perspective on mergers and acquisitions, with some consideration of the social and economic significance of business combinations. Attention will be paid to relevant statutes, negotiation, acquisition documents, valuation methodologies, and characteristic problems in negotiated acquisitions, in addition to careful examination of takeover defenses and Delaware case law. Simulations and drafting exercises may be a component.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
1 Michigan Legal Analysis and Writing / Dinan, Tim.600A 001 97ENU8 BAR PREP COURSE S/9:00am-12:00pm Jan 24, 31, Feb 21, 28, Mar 21, (Apr 11 make-up session) 80 474 No Exam,
The course format focuses on teaching analysis and writing skills for answering the Michigan Bar Examination essay questions. Students will be exposed to the skills necessary to organize and present answers to maximize points awarded by the examiners. Students will do simulation questions with answers graded by former Michigan bar exam graders. Additionally, random student answers will be critiqued with the entire class to identify strengths and weaknesses. Attendance and participation in all sessions is required to obtain credit for the course. Only graduating third year students are eligible to enroll in this course.
3 Mortgages / Johnson, Cla.593C 001 97ENU9 TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 100 472 05-08-2015 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 406) This course considers various aspects of the law of suretyship and real property security, including land mortgages, land contracts, right to rents and profits before and after foreclosure sale, redemption, subordination agreements, circuity problems under contradictory systems of priorities pursuant to state and federal law, and security interests in fixtures under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code and the land law.
Prerequisite(s): Property
3 Natural Resources Law / Singel, Wen.566C 001 97ENVB MW/10:30am-11:45am 24 340 Final Paper,
(Formerly DCL 463) This course will explore the legal regimes under which public natural resources are allocated and managed. In addition, this course will consider the laws governing federal public lands, which constitute one-third of the nation. Special attention will be given to the costs and benefits of resources development and conservation, and to the philosophical, historical and constitutional underpinnings of natural resources law and policy. Resources studied will include forests, minerals, oil and gas, rangeland, recreation, water, wilderness and wildlife.
2 Negotiation / Raheem, Ant.591C 001 97ENVC W/8:30am-10:10am 20 335 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 520) This course introduces principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in multiple mock negotiations, with frequent feedback from the instructor.
2 Negotiation / Basta, Jos.591C 002 97EN5V T/10:30am-12:10pm 16 335 Take Home Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 520) This course introduces principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in multiple mock negotiations, with frequent feedback from the instructor.
2 No-Fault Insurance Law / Sinas, Geo.595 301 97ENVD W/5:45pm-7:25pm 30 325 05-07-2015 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 319) This course will provide an in-depth look at Michigan's version of the no-fault concept. Statutory and case precedent dealing with such issues as coverage, first-party benefits and limits on recovery will be explored. Also, the policy behind and practical application of the no-fault "threshold" will be studied.
2 Patent Litigation / Murphy, Kri.533R 001 97ENVE M/4:00pm-5:40pm 20 341 No Exam,
This course shall consider strategies and procedures pertaining to patent litigation in the U.S. federal courts. Details of the Patent Act and case law shall be analyzed with regard to discovery, motion practice, trial practice, infringement, invalidity and remedies. No technical degree is required. It is recommended students complete Civil Procedure I and II and Patent Law before enrolling in this course.
1 Perspectives on Law for King Scholars / Saunders, Kev.626A 001 97ENVF M/4:00pm-4:55pm 20 344 No Exam,
(Formerly DCL 602) This course is a one credit course open only to first year King Scholars. It will be taught in the second semester, when first year students have one less credit than the first, and is an attempt to add first year content of the King Scholars Program. The course will consist of one hour per week sessions in a book discussion format. The books assigned will provide perspectives on the law not regularly provided in the curriculum. For example, for Spring 2005 the book of Carl Bogus's "Why Lawsuits are Good for America" will be used. Books will change from year to year.
1 Problem Solving in Michigan Family Law / Gentry, Kev.600G 001 97EN52 BAR PREP COURSE F/1:30pm-3:10pm Jan 16 - Feb 27, 2015 80 474 03-06-2015 9:00 AM
This course will enable the student to accurately identify applicable issues arising from various family law scenarios and analyze such scenarios using the applicable Michigan authority. 
2 Problem-solving Approaches to Conflict Resolution / Roumell, Geo.505C 301 97ENVG M/5:45pm-7:25pm 40 345 Take Home Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 553) (Formerly ADR Survey) This interactive course will cover the following topics: critical perspectives of ADR, negotiations (strategies, positioning for influence, and truthfulness), mediation (structuring enforceable agreements to mediate, confidentiality, mediator liability, and professional responsibility issues in mediation), third party evaluation and fact-finding, settlement perspectives, including the use of class actions, arbitration (preemption, enforceability of agreements to arbitrate, defenses to arbitration, due process, remedies and judicial review, judicial immunity), and alternative dispute resolution in state and federal courts. Teaching modalities will include lecture, simulations, video and exercises, along with selected book readings. 
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I
2-3 Public International Law / Reifenberg, Jr., Joh.548N 001 97ENVM TR/10:30am-11:45am 30 325 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 341) This course involves the study of the international legal system, sources and organizations. It also examines the relationship of individuals and states in international law and transnational legal and economic problems.
2 Public Law Colloquium / Sant'Ambrogio, Mic.551C 001 97EN5R W/10:30am-12:10pm 20 335 Final Paper,
The Public Law Colloquium offers students an opportunity to examine current issues in Constitutional, Administrative and Regulatory Law at an advanced level. The Colloquium will focus on a significant Public Law issue each week and may include guests working or writing in the area. The specific topics of inquiry will be chosen at the beginning of the semester with an eye to important cases working their way through the courts or before the Supreme Court this term, but generally they will include public law’s role in overseeing the actions of Congress, the President (the institution and the person), and administrative and regulatory agencies; how public law can create a more competitive arena for democratic politics; how administrative and regulatory agency design can improve political accountability, effectiveness, and policy coordination; the extent and limits of the President’s enforcement power as a means of implementing policy; and the role of private enforcement of public rights and public enforcement of private rights. Students taking the class for 2 credits will be responsible for writing several short “reaction papers” to the readings or “concurring/dissenting opinions” to recent judicial decisions along with one in-class presentation. Students taking the class for 3 credits will also write and present an independent research paper that qualifies for ULWR credit.
Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I and The Regulatory State.
2 Refugee and Asylum Law Seminar / Aronson, Lau.541U 301 97EN53 W/5:45pm-7:25pm 20 341 Final Paper,
This course will provide an overview of refugee and asylum law in the United States. It will explore the contours of the refugee definition and each element of an asylum claim by looking at statutes, regulations, treaties, and relevant case law. The course will compare the related protections of withholding of removal and relief under the Convention Against Torture. Finally, the course will discuss U.S. asylum procedure generally, and bars to asylum, both substantive and procedural. 
3 Remedies / Grosso, Cat.593D 001 97ENVV MW/9:00am-10:15am 90 472 05-08-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 423) This course provides an overview of the main types of remedies available in the American legal system following a determination of liability for violation of contract, tort, property, or constitutional law. The course will cover monetary damages, equitable relief, and examine the implications of choosing particular remedies, when such choice is available.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I
3 Sales and Leases / Spoon, Ell.501F 001 97ENVY MW/9:00am-10:15am 80 474 05-08-2015 8:30 AM
This course examines the information and terms, as well as remedies for breach, of contracts for sales of goods, under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). The course also examines Article 2A's provisions on leases and provides an overview of the similarities and differences between Article 2 of the UCC and the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods. Other topics that the course may cover include documents of title under Article 7 of the UCC, Magnuson Moss Warranty Act, or the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA). Students who have taken Commercial Transactions (LAW 501C) may be ineligible to take this course, so approval from the professor must be obtained to enroll.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II
2 Secured Transactions / Johnson, Cla.501E 001 97ENVZ TR/9:20am-10:10am 100 472 04-30-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 240) Covers the process of financing the sale of goods, the secured transaction under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, including creation, perfection, priority of security interests in personal property and default procedures.
2 Securities Litigation Seminar / Edwards, Ben.524A 001 97ENV2 R/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 335 No Exam,
The Securities Litigation Seminar explores securities law from the perspective of the litigation attorney. Beginning with litigation under the Securities Act, the Exchange Act and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act, this class will analyze the field of securities litigation with an emphasis on complex litigation structures, procedural issues, multi-forum litigation, and professional responsibilities unique to the securities context. Additionally, this seminar will address the role of the attorney in litigation with the SEC in both civil and criminal contexts, developments in international securities litigation, and securities arbitration.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
2 Special Topics in Comp Law: Comparative Constitutional Law / Staszewski, Gle.549C 001 97ENV3 M/10:30am-12:10pm 40 325 05-06-2015 8:30 AM
This course covers special topics in law that may be taught in conjunction with MSU Law programs, visiting professors or other reasons.
3 Street Law - Teaching Law to High School Students / Rosa, Jen.630K 001 97ENV4 M/3:30pm-5:10pm 12 335 No Exam, P S
The class is a three-credit course and includes up to 12 law students who teach in pairs in various Lansing high school social studies classes. The substance of the course utilizes discussion of landmark Supreme Court cases in the context of hypothetical fact patterns that relate to the high school students' lives. The topics of the classes can include the American Legal System, Constitutional Law, and Criminal Law. The law student instructors use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings that the student instructors practice in a weekly seminar at the law school. The course has two components: a 100-minute weekly seminar, and a field component in which the law students teach in one-hour increments. Law students are responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once the plans are approved by both the Law School faculty member and the high school teacher. Students' grades are based in part on their performance during the training and seminar portions of the course and in part on their performance in the high school classrooms that are monitored by the law school faculty member. Enrollment in this course is by permission only. The credit/no credit option cannot be elected.
Prerequisite(s): Constitutional Law I, Constitutional Law II, Criminal Law
2 Tax Policy Seminar / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.572D 001 97ENV5 M/10:30am-12:10pm 20 335 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCl 517) This seminar covers a range of tax policy issues arising from Federal Taxation. The specific issues studied will vary but, in general, will focus on progressivity and redistribution. Topics likely to be covered include: the use of the income tax as a fiscal policy tool; the concept of income; imputed income; progressive versus flat tax rates; taxation of families; income versus consumption taxation; tax expenditures, exclusions, and deductions; taxation of business and investment income; capital gains and losses; and transfer or wealth taxes. A paper will be required. The topic will be determined after consultation with the instructor. This seminar is open to students who have taken or are enrolled in Basic Income Taxation (A or B). Others who are interested may enroll with the permission of the instructor.
2 Topics in Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law / Brown, Tro.550A 001 97ENV7 R/10:30am-12:10pm 20 341 Final Paper,
Students who have taken Conflict of Laws (Law 550) may not take this course. Students who take this course may not take Conflict of Laws. The theory of the course is to provide students a learning environment that is mid-way between law school and the real world of law practice. Thus, instead of the usual law school discussion class led by the professor, roughly half the classes are hands-on litigation exercises run by the class members. Instead of the usual final exam, students are doing memos and a longer writing assignment closer to the actual writing lawyers do on the job. Students may find assignments longer than they are used to in other courses. This course includes two components. The first component is an intensive exploration of the doctrine and policy considerations relevant to choice-of-law determinations. The second component is comprised of simulated appellate litigation – in short, moot court exercises conducted by the students in class. The purpose of the doctrine/policy half of the course is to prepare students for the moot court problems (and ultimately, for the practice of law). The simulated litigation portion of the course will be composed of moot court exercises in which students will be required to participate in oral argument and/or judicial decision making, to do primary legal research to write an opinion in a problem of the student’s choice and a series of bench memoranda in which students propose results for some of the problems that students would recommend to a judge deciding those cases. 
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I (LAW 530A)
2 Topics in Constitutional Law: Judicial Biographies / Kuykendall, Mae.579U 001 97ENV8 W/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 341 Final Paper, U
This course will be an examination of the form, sources, and purpose of judicial biographies and other primary materials about judges, with particular reference to the U.S. Supreme Court. Students will study inside stories of the Supreme Court or other courts, archival materials from judges’ papers, and historical interpretations of the dynamics among judges within court and by judges with political actors.
2 Trade Secrets / Moore, Tod.535N 301 97ENV9 W/5:45pm-7:25pm 30 345 Final Paper,
Trade secret law is the black sheep of United States IP laws because it originates in state common law, not federal statutory law. Highly influenced by the uniform statute and restatement movements, trade secret law has become somewhat consistent across the fifty states, becoming a coherent and important body of law. Trade secrets are arguably the most widespread of IP protections and can cover subject matter that patent and copyright cannot such as formulas, recipes, and customer lists. This course is intended to provide students with a thorough background in the central principles of trade secret law. 
2 Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law / Blattner, Joh.533N 301 97ENWA M/5:45pm-7:25pm 40 346 05-07-2015 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 461) This course addresses current issues and developments such as the constitutional foundations and limitations of trademark protection, domain names and cybersquatting.
2 Transnational Legal Research / Hedin, Jan.548Q 001 97ENWB M/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 335 No Exam,
(Formerly DCL 445) This course is designed to develop the student's skills in legal research, writing and advocacy concerning legal problems transcending national borders. Class work is split into lecture and library sessions concentrating on legal bibliography and the legal process of transnational problems. The course also will include an intensive writing and advocacy exercise. Performance in the course will provide the basis for invitation to membership on the Jessup Team or the Niagara Team.
2 Trial Practice Institute-Pretrial II / McNally, Ver.623C 001 97ENWD R/1:30pm-3:10pm 16 428 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 513) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Pretrial II focuses on the fundamental approaches of persuasion, elements of advocacy and methods of effective presentation. The class is divided into four teams of four people which are then assigned depositions of witnesses in a problem with fact, lay and expert witnesses. At the conclusion of the deposition phase of the problem, motions in limine are prepared and argued by each team. Additionally, a facilitative mediation brief is prepared by all teams and argued. At the conclusion of the class, opening statements are prepared and presented by each one of the teams. The students will be prepared at the end of the course for the elements of the Trial I course that will commence in the second year of the program. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
2 Trial Practice Institute-Pretrial II / Sherman, Ann.623C 301 97ENWC M/5:30pm-7:10pm 16 340/343 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 513) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Pretrial II focuses on the fundamental approaches of persuasion, elements of advocacy and methods of effective presentation. The class is divided into four teams of four people which are then assigned depositions of witnesses in a problem with fact, lay and expert witnesses. At the conclusion of the deposition phase of the problem, motions in limine are prepared and argued by each team. Additionally, a facilitative mediation brief is prepared by all teams and argued. At the conclusion of the class, opening statements are prepared and presented by each one of the teams. The students will be prepared at the end of the course for the elements of the Trial I course that will commence in the second year of the program. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
3 Trial Practice Institute-Trial II / Aquilina, Ros.623E 301 97ENWE T/6:00pm-8:30pm 16 428 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 542 and DCL 565, Formerly Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIA and Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIB ) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. This course caps the trial training program at Michigan State University-DCL College of Law. The purpose of the course is to provide graduating seniors with the opportunity to use the skills and education they have received to handle a complete criminal case, from their initial interview with the client (or making the charging decision based upon a law enforcement investigation and request for warrant). This program is unique in that the defendant, law enforcement witnesses, civilian witnesses, and expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University, Department of Theatre. The expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University Medical School. The objective for all students involved is to have hands on experience related to their particular college and curriculum at Michigan State University. Law students will have an opportunity to take a criminal case from start to finish, investigating the facts of the case, preparing for all aspects of the case through the development of the theory of the case, interviewing witnesses, conducting the preliminary examination, motion practice and culminating with the trial itself. The goal is to provide an opportunity to put into practice what students have learned over their law school career at MSU College of Law. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
3 Trial Practice Institute-Trial II / Buckley, J. .623E 302 97ENWF W/6:00pm-8:30pm 16 428 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 542 and DCL 565, Formerly Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIA and Trial Practice Institute-Trial IIB ) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. This course caps the trial training program at Michigan State University-DCL College of Law. The purpose of the course is to provide graduating seniors with the opportunity to use the skills and education they have received to handle a complete criminal case, from their initial interview with the client (or making the charging decision based upon a law enforcement investigation and request for warrant). This program is unique in that the defendant, law enforcement witnesses, civilian witnesses, and expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University, Department of Theatre. The expert witnesses will be students from the Michigan State University Medical School. The objective for all students involved is to have hands on experience related to their particular college and curriculum at Michigan State University. Law students will have an opportunity to take a criminal case from start to finish, investigating the facts of the case, preparing for all aspects of the case through the development of the theory of the case, interviewing witnesses, conducting the preliminary examination, motion practice and culminating with the trial itself. The goal is to provide an opportunity to put into practice what students have learned over their law school career at MSU College of Law. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
1 Trial Practice Institute: Theatrical Skills - Advocacy as a Performing Art / Job, Mar.623A 001 97ENWH W/1:30pm-3:10pm March 4 - April 22, 2015 16 428 No Exam,
(Formerly DCL 533) A 7 week workshop designed to enhance a students' advocacy skills through application of actor training techniques by increasing student awareness of the ability to communicate effectively with both voice and body. The course consists of one 1 hour 50 minute session per week for 7 weeks in which students will participate in various acting exercises and improvisations emphasizing effective use of body language and physical expressiveness, developing spontaneity in presenting prepared material, exploring the rhetorical hooks and vocal nuances essential to persuasive speaking and strengthening storytelling skills. At the end of the workshop, students will present a public speech by a current or historical speaker as if it was an opening or closing argument to a jury. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
1 Trial Practice Institute: Theatrical Skills - Advocacy as a Performing Art / Lepard, Joh.623A 002 97ENWJ T/10:30am-12:10pm March 3 - April 21, 2015 16 428 No Exam,
(Formerly DCL 533) A 7 week workshop designed to enhance a students' advocacy skills through application of actor training techniques by increasing student awareness of the ability to communicate effectively with both voice and body. The course consists of one 1 hour 50 minute session per week for 7 weeks in which students will participate in various acting exercises and improvisations emphasizing effective use of body language and physical expressiveness, developing spontaneity in presenting prepared material, exploring the rhetorical hooks and vocal nuances essential to persuasive speaking and strengthening storytelling skills. At the end of the workshop, students will present a public speech by a current or historical speaker as if it was an opening or closing argument to a jury. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
2 Workers' Compensation / Bruce-Erickson, Car.610 001 97ENWM F/10:00am-11:40am 20 324 05-05-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 389) This course involves the study of the principal provisions of the Michigan Workers' Disability Compensation Act and decisions thereunder, notably in respect to compensability, benefits and proceedings before the Compensation Bureau.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Miscellaneous
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Advanced Mediation / Pappas, Bri.587G 001 97FTNJ Arranged 8 No Exam, P
An intensive skills-based course preparing students to compete in mediation competitions. Students will be selected based on the basis of their skills, their potential to be excellent teammates, to work hard, and to represent Michigan State University College of Law. This course allows students to develop their mediation and representation skills in an intensive, skills-based format. Preparing for a regional mediation competition, students will develop skills in the areas of problem analysis, mediation preparation, communications skills and strategies, and reflection and improvement. Through competition, students experience what it is to be a professional, competent, and ethical mediation advocate and third-party neutral. If successful, students may advance to compete at an international mediation competition. In addition to participation in the regional competition, the course will provide skills building opportunity through mediation simulations.
Prerequisite(s): Mediation Advocacy and Domestic Relations Mediator Training or Mediation Advocacy and Civil Facilitative Mediator Training
2 Moot Court Board / Copland, Jen.627C 002 97EPCW Arranged 13 No Exam, P
(Formerly DCL 702) Prerequisites: RWA I and II, see scholarship policy Board members and candidates participate in and supervise intramural and inter-school competitions. Board membership is by invitation and carries one credit hour per semester. Students who have completed 29 credit hours are eligible to become candidates for the board. Candidates receive one semester hour of credit for participation in Moot Court Competition. Two semesters of credit as a candidate must be completed to qualify for invitation to the board.
2 Moot Court Board / McNally, Ver.627C 001 97EPCV Arranged 8 No Exam, P
(Formerly DCL 702) Prerequisites: RWA I and II, see scholarship policy Board members and candidates participate in and supervise intramural and inter-school competitions. Board membership is by invitation and carries one credit hour per semester. Students who have completed 29 credit hours are eligible to become candidates for the board. Candidates receive one semester hour of credit for participation in Moot Court Competition. Two semesters of credit as a candidate must be completed to qualify for invitation to the board.
2 NNALSA Moot Court Competition / Fort, Kat.627J 001 97FPPY Arranged 6 No Exam, P
The National Native American Law Students Association (NNALSA) Moot Court Competition is a national competition which focuses its appellate moot court problem on an area of federal Indian law. This class will prepare students for the competition. Students selected to compete will be required to complete an appellate brief and meet for oral argument practice and discussion of the problem.
Prerequisite(s): RWA
2 Williams Institute Moot Court Competition Class / Costello, Nan.627G 001 97FSVP Arranged 5 No Exam, P
The Williams Institute of UCLA School of Law hosts the only national competition dedicated exclusively to the subject of sexual orientation and gender identity law. In preparing for the Williams Institute Moot Court Competition, students will develop skills in the areas of advanced legal research, legal writing, critical examination of the detailed nuances of a complex legal issue, team work, and strategies for planning an effective oral argument. Students will be selected to represent Michigan State University College of Law based on their interest in the subject area, their written and oral advocacy skills, their potential to be excellent teammates, and ability to work hard. This course allows students to develop specialized knowledge in Constitutional law.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Clinics
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Chance at Childhood Clinic / Kozakiewicz, Jos.631F 001 97ENXF Arranged 6 Clinic No Exam, P S
The Clinic provides a setting for law and social work students to gain experience in child advocacy. The Clinic provides a forum for advocating for children, both in individual cases and through seeking to affect public policy and practice within the state of Michigan. Student teams will serve in a variety of roles to effectively advocate for children.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspective and Advocacy
3-6 Civil Rights Clinic I / Manville, Dan.630X 001 97ENXG TR/9:00am-10:15am 2 Clinic No Exam, P S
Students will receive a versatile and well-rounded education in the intricacies of civil rights law and hone client management, case management, negotiation, and trial skills. Students will use their knowledge and skills to litigate civil rights cases in federal District Court (WD, MI) for their clients, prisoners who are incarcerated in Michigan and have asserted claims about the conditions of their confinement. Under the supervision of clinic faculty, students will represent their clients at all stages of these cases, including case development and strategy, discovery, motion practice, and trial. In addition to class times, students enrolled in this clinical program must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week NOTE: (1) Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for the application deadline). Preference will be given to students who commit to participate in the clinic for two semesters. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisite(s): All student clinicians enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic I must have successfully completed RWA and Advocacy. In addition, they must have successfully completed the first year (six credits) of the Law Colleges TPI program or must have successfully completed at least six credits in Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Rights Seminar, Complex Civil Litigation, or Constitutional Law II.
3-6 Civil Rights Clinic II / Manville, Dan.630Z 001 97ENXH TR/9:00am-10:15am 5 Clinic No Exam, P S
This is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Civil Rights Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling clients, managing a caseload, and litigating civil rights cases on their clients’ behalf in federal District Court. Typically, students who are enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic II assume a more in-depth role in their clients’ litigation. As in Civil Rights Clinic I, students further their experience under the supervision of clinic faculty and enhance their knowledge of civil rights law and trial practice. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12 to15 hours weekly). NOTE: (1) Enrollment in Civil Rights Clinic II is by invitation only. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Rights Clinic I
4 Conflict Resolution Clinic I / Tarr, Nin.631D 001 97ENXJ W/12:00pm-5:00pm F/8:00am-5:00pm 7 Clinic No Exam, P S
This clinic will focus on teaching students to be problem solvers which is a fundamental skill that lawyers need regardless of the work they do or the setting in which they do this work. The primary method of problem solving that the students will learn is mediation which is increasingly used by lawyers and sometimes mandated by courts, agencies, and organizations to resolve controversies. This course will provide an opportunity to learn the theory, skills, and professionalism issues associated with mediation and conflict resolution. Students will have opportunities to hone and enhance their learning by applying their skills to real problems presented by real people. By doing so, they will provide access to justice to people who would otherwise be unable to afford services. Professionalism and ethics will be an essential component of the program. Students will be expected to identify, research, and discuss the challenges that they are facing with an eye towards what kind of professional they want to become no matter where they work. They will not only look at the Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct for Lawyers and the Michigan Supreme Court Standards of Conduct for Mediators to inform their discussions, they will be expected to consider the cultural, economic, psychological, moral, policy, and personal implications of choices that they make. A key component of the clinic is to train students to be reflective practitioners who continue to learn from their experiences for the rest of their professional lives. The students will explicitly be taught to engage in meaningful reflection about their own work and the work of the other professionals with whom they come into contact. Enrollment is by permission only
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective; and Advocacy.
Var Conflict Resolution Clinic II / Tarr, Nin.631E 001 97EN6D Arranged 2 Clinic No Exam, P S
A supplement to Conflict Resolution Clinic I, open to students who have successfully completed Conflict Resolution Clinic I, and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of two to four credits.
Prerequisite(s): Conflict Resolution Clinic I
4 Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I / Costello, Nan.630T 001 97ENXK M/8:30am-10:10am R/1:30pm-3:10pm 6 M/345 R/Clinic No Exam, P S
The Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic has three components. Students will teach First Amendment workshops to faculty advisors and student journalists at Michigan high schools covering censorship, libel, and privacy issues, as well as copyright and libel matters involving Facebook and Internet postings. Students also will provide pro bono legal representation to high school and community college journalists whose free speech rights have been challenged. In addition, clinic students will conduct a Freedom of Information Act survey of school district regulations that govern First Amendment rights of student journalists. Students will receive targeted instruction on First Amendment press issues on a weekly basis. As workshop instructors, students will use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings. Students will be responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once they are approved by a Law College faculty member and a high school teacher. In addition to class time, students must work a minimum of 12 hours each week in representing pro bono clients and preparing First Amendment workshops. Some travel time to high schools may be required. Students are selected to participate through an application process. NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisites: RWA I and II; (successful completion of Media Law is preferred, but not required)
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
4 Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic II / Costello, Nan.630U 001 97ENXM Arranged 2 Clinic No Exam, P S
course description forthcoming
Prerequisite(s): Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I
4 Housing Law Clinic I / Gilmore, Bri.630V 001 97ENXN MW/10:00am-11:15am 6 Clinic No Exam, P S
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic I - LAW 630A) Housing Law Clinic I is a comprehensive housing clinic that will cover a variety of housing areas for students. Students will have the opportunity to master the basics of local landlord-tenant law, and to focus on how the clinic can best serve the community in the housing area based upon the overall needs of the community and the problems facing consumers with respect to their housing choices. Other areas of clinic development and student advocacy will entail, but will not be limited to, foreclosures, fair housing, affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness. Students can be expected to be assigned actual clients with housing problems and will, with supervision, act as legal counsel for these clients in a variety of settings. This will include advocacy in local housing courts and judicial tribunals in the state of Michigan. However, students will be mainly trained to be advocates, in and out of a judicial setting, with the overall goal to provide the student with a more expansive and well-rounded experience regarding housing law in a legal education setting. Students also will have the opportunity to consider other areas of housing advocacy where they might be able to have an impact on the lives of consumers, and will be supervised and supported in pursuing these goals on behalf of consumers. Enrollment in Housing Law Clinic I is by application only. Details about the application process will be provided to students in advance of each semester's enrollment period. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student works between 12-15 hours weekly in addition to instructional time). NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory orientation session that will likely take place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II,Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy
4 Housing Law Clinic II / Gilmore, Bri.630W 001 97ENXP Arranged 3 Clinic No Exam, P S
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic II - LAW 630B) Housing Law Clinic II provides an opportunity for students, upon approval of the supervising faculty, to continue work Housing Law Clinic. The selected students will be expected to provide support and work more independently than students enrolled in Housing Law Clinic I. Expectations are high and ongoing projects and cases that these students are engaged in will be a core responsibility.
Prerequisite(s): Housing Law Clinic I, Rental Housing Clinic I
6 Immigration Law Clinic I / Thronson, Ver.630R 001 97ENXR TR/1:30pm-2:30pm 9 Clinic No Exam, P S
Students engage with immigrant communities through direct client representation and systemic advocacy. The Immigration Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to experience the practice of law in a well-supervised and academically rigorous program that both prepares them for the practice of law and enables them to critically assess social justice issues. In addition to client representation and advocacy, students participate in a clinic seminar. Students are required to work an average of 20 hours per week. Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for details of application process).
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II or Research, Writing & Analysis, Advocacy
Var Immigration Law Clinic II / Thronson, Ver.630S 001 97ENXS Arranged 1 Clinic No Exam, P S
A supplement to Immigration Law Clinic I, open to students who have successfully completed Immigration Law Clinic I, and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Students work on a clinic-based project developed in consultation with the professor. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of one to three credits. Prerequisite(s): Immigration Law Clinic I
Prerequisite(s): Immigration Law Clinic I
6 Investor Advocacy Clinic I / Edwards, Ben.631B 001 97ENXT M/3:30pm-6:00pm 5 Clinic No Exam, P S
The Investor Advocacy Clinic (the “IAC”) exposes second and third year law students to securities litigation and regulation under the supervision of a licensed attorney. In addition to gaining securities and financial products litigation experience, students will learn about the regulatory organizations governing financial institutions and serve as important community resources by providing investor education. Although the caseload will vary each semester, students will draft arbitration and mediation materials and may litigate, mediate, settle, arbitrate or try cases. Students may also research and draft comment letters to provide analyses on proposed rules and regulations and will make community presentations about investor and financial protection topics. Clinic seminars will take two forms: topical and case rounds. Topical sessions focus on substantive law, procedure, policy or lawyering issues and will generally involve discussion of assigned reading or in-class exercises to highlight particular issues. Case rounds provide an opportunity to respond to legal, ethical, professional or policy issues arising in case work. Admission to the Investor Advocacy Clinic is by application only and requires a substantial time commitment of approximately twenty hours per week.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, or Advocacy, Research, Writing & Analysis
Var Investor Advocacy Clinic II / Edwards, Ben.631C 001 97EN6N Arranged 3 Clinic No Exam, P S
This is a continuing opportunity for students who have successfully completed coursework in Investor Advocacy Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills and to assume greater responsibility with client matters. It also provides for assignment of more complex issues and an opportunity to assist with mentoring of Clinic I students. Open to students who have successfully completed Investor Advocacy Clinic I and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of one to six credits (as agreed to by the Clinic Director), depending upon the student's participation level. The number of working hours required will be dependent on the credit hours determined.
Prerequisite(s): Investor Advocacy Clinic I
4 Tax Clinic I / Wease, Jos.630C 001 97ENXU MW/2:00pm-3:15pm 12 Clinic No Exam, P S
(Formerly DCL 476) Students enrolled in Tax Clinic I become "client ready" by representing clients with respect to a broad range of federal, state, and local tax controversies. Students advocate for their clients by working through a variety of administrative determinations, as well as by routinely participating in collection due process and Appeals hearings before the Internal Revenue Service and informal conferences before the Michigan Department of Treasury. In addition, they litigate cases in the United States Tax Court, the Michigan Tax Tribunal, the United States District Courts, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and Michigan appellate courts. Students also counsel ESL taxpayers about their rights and responsibilities under the Internal Revenue Code, and engage in numerous outreaches designed to educate the public about tax issues and requirements. All work takes place under the guidance and close supervision of experienced clinical faculty. Class sessions focus not only on substantive tax issues, but also on professional development, ethical considerations, policy matters, and client and case management. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours - in addition to class time - during the semester, and are expected to participate in a one-day orientati1n scheduled before the beginning of the semester.
Prerequisite(s): For students admitted before Fall 2011, Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II; for students admitted in Fall 2011 and later, Research, Writing & Analysis and Advocacy.
4 Tax Clinic II / Wease, Jos.630D 001 97ENXV Arranged 8 Clinic No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 515) Tax Clinic II is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Tax Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling and representing clients, to take on more complex assignments, and to assist in mentoring Tax Clinic I students. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours during the semester.
Prerequisite(s): Tax Clinic I
2-4 Urban Food, Farm and Agriculture Law Practicum / Patel, Jay.566P 001 97ENXW F/12:00pm-3:00pm 3 Clinic No Exam, P S
Students will engage in two overlapping sets of activities. First, they will develop an understanding of the issues confronting urban agriculture and food access in Detroit and conduct a strategic planning process with key MSU and Detroit partners. Second, they will identify some of the most promising community agriculture projects in Detroit, determine the legal impediments facing those groups, and create a focused plan – examining geography, strong community partners, and key legal requirements – to address those issues. Students will be expected to work 14 hours per week outside of the seminar class.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I or Research, Writing and Analysis and Research, Writing and Advocacy II or Advocacy
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

D.C. Program
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Administrative Law: Food Safety and Labeling / Copland, Jen.810K 731 97EN5T Online this course is intended for students in the DC program 10 Take Home Exam,
Administrative law is the body of constitutional, statutory, and common law principles that both constrain and seek to legitimize the exercise of powers by governmental agencies. The history of food safety and labeling regulations in the United States begins in the late 1800s and continues through present day, culminating recently in the 2011 enactment of the Food Safety Modernization Act, which creates a new system of federal oversight of domestically produced and imported food products. This course introduces students to the essential elements of administrative law and follows the basic structure of an administrative law course, but diverges from the traditional study by using cases and problems that are specific to food safety and food labeling issues in the United States. The primary goal of the class is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamental administrative law principles applied in matters involving the regulation of food and food products, and the ability to apply these principles to problems similar to those encountered in actual practice. To the extent possible, this class will be taught from a practice-oriented approach, requiring students to engage in problem-solving exercises online.
2 Advanced Legal Research / Hanna, Hil.586 730 97EN5U Online this course is intended for students in the DC program 10 No Exam,
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
2 Law Practice Management / Kaser, Bri.592 730 97EN5N Online this course is intended for students in the DC program 10 Take Home Exam,
This course focuses on the business fundamentals needed to build a strong law practice of sustaining value, regardless of firm size. It introduces students to the common forms of private practice (partnership, professional corporations and sole practitioners), governance, economic considerations, compensation systems, personnel management, necessary capital investment, systems development and compliance issues. It also examines individual practice management challenges, such as personal marketing, client management, pricing and project management, personal business planning and managing professional relationships.
2 Laws of War / Lynch, Joh.548M 301 97EN5X M/6:00pm-7:56pm 7 In DC Take Home Exam, P
(Formerly DCL 548) This course will examine the origins, purpose, content, development and the impact of the laws of war in light of the changing nature of armed conflict. At its core, the primary purpose of the laws of war is to limit the suffering caused by war and armed conflicts. Accordingly, the course seeks to develop a better understanding of the need for and the existence of the laws of war; to determine whether the laws of war are effective in limiting the suffering of combatants and noncombatants during armed conflicts and to evaluate whether the laws of war have been applied, observed, enforced or ignored by policymakers, military officials and international institutions in modern armed conflicts. Since the laws of war have not uniformly applied, observed or enforced, the course will emphasize the contradictions, successes and failures of the laws of war. Some of the issues that will be examined throughout the course include: where are laws of war found? Is it really possible to introduce rules to warfare? From where do laws of war arise, and how do they become "law"? Is "just war" a relevant concept in today's world? How successful have past international regulatory efforts been concerning limiting warfare? What is permissible conduct in combat and what is not? What do the Nuremberg trials of World War II tell us about warfighting today? Was My Lai the result of criminal behavior by individual soldiers or a logical result of the military policies pursued in Viet Nam? Was the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki a war crime? Do the laws of war apply to the current war on terrorism?
2 Legislative Drafting / Kellner, Ken.579M 301 97EN5W T/7:00pm-8:40pm 5 In DC Take Home Exam, P
Legislation, whether it is public legislation such as constitutional provisions, statutes, administrative rules, or regulatory orders or private legislation such as wills, contracts, leases, or trusts, has come to have a greater impact on everyday life than the common law. This has resulted in a greater need for attorneys who have developed the unique set of skills required for legislative drafting. This course provides students with an introduction to legislative drafting, particularly in the realm of public legislation. The course will explore the history of legislative drafting; the process of legislative drafting; legislative procedure; and the language, structure, and grammar of legislation. By the end of the course, students should have acquired the basic skills needed to draft legislation, whether as a general practitioner, public interest group attorney, lobbyist, legislator, or legislative staff member.
2 Media Law Online / Costello, Nan.533G 730 97EN5S Online this course is intended for students in the DC program 10 Final Paper,
The online Media Law course will include recorded lectures punctuated by several videos, recorded music, visual images and news clips to illustrate legal concepts such as defamation, copyright infringement, intrusion into privacy, false light, right to publicity, and other causes of action covered by the course. The online class will include recorded talks by special presenters. A taped panel discussion featuring journalists, bloggers and First Amendment attorneys would also be included.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Journals
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
Var International Law Review / Bean, Bru.629A 001 97E6AV Arranged 39 No Exam, P U
(Formerly Journal of International Law) Participation by writing competition upon satisfactory completion by day students of two full semesters and by evening students of three full semesters. Two credits of ungraded credit earned upon completion of a student article, a comment, required production work and participation in the organization of the International Law Symposium and the International Achievement Award Dinner.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
Var Journal of Animal Law / Favre, Dav.629C 001 97E6AW Arranged 4 No Exam, P U
The Journal of Animal Law was the second legal journal established in North America specializing in animal law and is currently one of only three existing that is dedicated to the specialized topic of animal law. The Journal of Animal Law has been able to welcome editors from other ABA-accredited law schools in addition to MSU College of Law. The goals of the Journal of Animal Law are: -To provide volumes of legal policy materials that relate to animal law and animal welfare. -To provide expert explanation of the materials for both legal and non-legal audiences. -To be an education resource for both the lawyer and the non-lawyer. -To provide historical perspective about social and legal attitudes toward animals, and how we as a society have arrived at its present perspective. Students must satisfy the following criteria to receive Journal credit: (1) two year participation on the Journal staff/board; (2)editing and cite-checking of papers submitted to the Journal; (3)satisfy editing obligation during the first-year on Journal staff; (4)election to Journal board for final year at the Law College; and (5) fulfill leadership obligations of Board position.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

American Legal System - LL.M./M.J.
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 American Constitutional Law for LL.M. / Lawrence, Mic.806A 001 97ENSE W/3:30pm-6:00pm 15 346 05-05-2015 8:30 AM
This course is for LL.M. students only. The course is designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals of the United States Constitution by surveying the Constitution’s approach to governmental structure and individual rights. Major topics include Federalism, Separation of Powers, Due Process, Equal Protection, and Freedom of Speech. Students who have taken Constitutional Law I or II are not eligible to enroll in this course.
3 American Constitutional Law for LL.M. / Lawrence, Mic.806A 002 97ENSF W/3:30pm-6:00pm This section for Institute students only 11 346 05-05-2015 8:30 AM P
This course is for LL.M. students only. The course is designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals of the United States Constitution by surveying the Constitution’s approach to governmental structure and individual rights. Major topics include Federalism, Separation of Powers, Due Process, Equal Protection, and Freedom of Speech. Students who have taken Constitutional Law I or II are not eligible to enroll in this course.
2 Civil Litigation Practice and Procedure for Foreign Lawyers / Wittner, Nic.805 001 97ENSV Feb. 5-8, 2015 R/5:30pm-9:30pm; FSa/9:00am-5:00pm; Su/5:30pm-9:30pm 20 In Dubai Take Home Exam,
This course explains the litigation process in the United States. It is designed to equip foreign-educated lawyers with the skills needed to manage lawsuits involving companies located abroad or subsidiary companies in the United States. The explanation includes (1) the jurisdiction of Unites States courts over lawsuits by or against these companies, (2) the procedures for filing or accepting a Complaint under the Hague Convention for the Service of Process Abroad and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure; (3) discovery under the Federal Rules, especially emerging requirements for electronic data, and the Hague Convention on the Taking of Evidence Abroad; (4) Rule 30(b)(6) requirements for testimony by corporate witnesses; (5) discovery sanctions; (6) trial procedures, particularly the use of company documents, witness testimony, and government investigations and recall orders as evidence; and, finally, appeal procedures. The fundamental practice skills involve selection of counsel; preparation of case budgets and management of legal fees; early evaluation of cases to decide if they should be tried or settled, and determining settlement values; negotiating settlements; mediating cases; collecting and producing documents and e-data; obtaining confidentiality agreements for proprietary information; preparing witnesses for deposition and trial, as well as at Congressional hearings (especially foreign company witnesses); and preparing for media requests, particularly during trial. These procedures and practice skills will come alive through the use of real-world examples. Students enrolled in this course are not eligible to enroll in International civil Litigation (548K) Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.
3 Communication Skills for Foreign Educated Lawyers / Copland, Jen.804C 001 97ENXE MW/1:30pm-2:45pm 11 324 No Exam, P
(Formally titled Advocacy for Foreign Educated Lawyers) This course is designed to provide an opportunity for lawyers who obtained their law degrees in countries other than the United States to practice their public speaking skills in an American law school environment. Course components include the study and practice of the elements of oral advocacy, including critical analysis and the development of effective public speaking techniques. This is primarily an experiential learning course with a focus on the delivery and critique of short oral exercises. The course structure follows possible pre-trial developments in a fictional legal case; students will be asked to step into the roles of parties and participants and advocate their positions through presentations, negotiations and oral argument. Students must complete two practice arguments which may fall outside of normal class hours, and must attend and observe at least one hour of argument in a local courtroom. While some written work will be assigned, the focus of this course is on the oral elements of advocacy. The credits earned in this course cannot be used toward the minimum credits needed to satisfy graduation requirements.
3 Criminal Law / Aquilina, Ros.500F 004 97ENTP F/9:00am-11:30am This section for LLM students only 30 474 05-13-2015 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 131) An examination of the criminal justice system, including emphasis on the role of defense counsel and prosecutor; the adversary system; ethical considerations; sources and aims of the criminal law and construction of criminal statutes; specific crimes against person, property and the state; inchoate crimes; defenses negating culpability; and the principles of responsibility and justification.
2 Foundations of Law and Legal Research / Domann, Bre.807A 730 97ENUD January-April, 2015 Intended for students in the IP, GFL and Dubai programs 20 Take Home Exam,
This online course provides an introduction to the American legal system with a special focus on the research and writing needs of international scholars and non-lawyers (focus on American jurisprudence and Global Food Law).
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
2 International Corporate Governance / Bean, Bru.508K 001 97ENUP April 30 - May 3, 2015 R/5:30pm-9:30pm; FSa/9:00am-5:00pm; Su/5:30pm-9:30pm 20 In Dubai Take Home Exam,
Corporate Governance involves the set of relationships among a company’s management, its board, its shareholders and its other stakeholders. The scope of these “other stakeholders” has been expanding dramatically in recent years, albeit at different rates and with differing results depending upon the jurisdiction. This term currently includes employees, suppliers, creditors, the surrounding communities, the environment, workers within the company’s supply chain and an ever-evolving panoply of additional parties with an interest in the operations and performance of the company. This course focuses on the broadening scope of such stakeholders in different jurisdictions and the impact of these developments on the internal governance of companies in those jurisdictions.
3 Legal English I for Foreign Lawyers / Francis, Jer. & Svec, Ter.804A 001 97ENXD TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 11 324 No Exam, P
Legal English I is designed to provide practice for foreign lawyers in the fundamental skills of written legal English and common law analysis in the United States. Students in Legal English I will draft a variety of legal documents and participate in a variety of oral exercises and presentations.
3 Reading Comprehension Skills for Foreign Lawyers / Wilson-Duffy, Car.804D 001 97ENVN MR/10:00am-12:40pm 12 344 No Exam, P
This course will help prepare foreign LLM students for full time academic work in the areas of English reading, speaking, and writing, with primary focus given to reading strategies and comprehension. Students will work to build arguments, synthesize ideas, and develop persuasive essays skills. Students will respond to literature and synthesize written works to support their writing. Students will learn editing and revision techniques with the goal of making them more independent writers, will work to improve their understanding and use of English grammar, and will learn to recognize and correct their own writing errors. Students will use reading and writing to explore ideas, to challenge opinions, and to think critically.
3 Research, Writing & Advocacy: International LL.M. / Mansour, Sam.804 001 97ENVW TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 20 341 No Exam,
Designed to teach international LL.M. foreign lawyers fundamental skills necessary for legal reasoning, research, and written communication in the United States common law system. The course consists of two components: Research and Writing Seminar. The research component of is designed to introduce students to basic legal research concepts and sources. Sources covered will include: secondary sources, statutory law, case law, and administrative law. At the end of the course students will be able to perform basic research functions, in both print and electronic format, including how to determine that a source is complete and current and how to effectively use free electronic resources as an alternative to print and fee based electronic resources. The Writing Seminar component of the course begins with the Writing Skills Inventory, and ends with the Writing Proficiency Test. The topics covered on the Writing Proficiency Test are covered in the Writing Seminars taught by the Writing Specialist. The Writing Skills Inventory will help students identify the areas they must work on to pass the Proficiency Test. Unlike the Writing Skills Inventory, the Proficiency Test will use examples and language taken from legal writing. Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.
2 Research, Writing & Advocacy: International LL.M. / Mansour, Sam.804 002 97ENVX March 12-15, 2015 R/5:30pm-9:30pm; FSa/9:00am-5:00pm; Su/5:30pm-9:30pm 20 In Dubai Take Home Exam,
Designed to teach international LL.M. foreign lawyers fundamental skills necessary for legal reasoning, research, and written communication in the United States common law system. The course consists of two components: Research and Writing Seminar. The research component of is designed to introduce students to basic legal research concepts and sources. Sources covered will include: secondary sources, statutory law, case law, and administrative law. At the end of the course students will be able to perform basic research functions, in both print and electronic format, including how to determine that a source is complete and current and how to effectively use free electronic resources as an alternative to print and fee based electronic resources. The Writing Seminar component of the course begins with the Writing Skills Inventory, and ends with the Writing Proficiency Test. The topics covered on the Writing Proficiency Test are covered in the Writing Seminars taught by the Writing Specialist. The Writing Skills Inventory will help students identify the areas they must work on to pass the Proficiency Test. Unlike the Writing Skills Inventory, the Proficiency Test will use examples and language taken from legal writing. Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Global Food Law - LL.M./M.J.
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Administrative Law: Food Safety and Labeling / Copland, Jen.810K 730 97ENR9 Online this course is intended for students in the Global Food Law Program 10 Take Home Exam,
Administrative law is the body of constitutional, statutory, and common law principles that both constrain and seek to legitimize the exercise of powers by governmental agencies. The history of food safety and labeling regulations in the United States begins in the late 1800s and continues through present day, culminating recently in the 2011 enactment of the Food Safety Modernization Act, which creates a new system of federal oversight of domestically produced and imported food products. This course introduces students to the essential elements of administrative law and follows the basic structure of an administrative law course, but diverges from the traditional study by using cases and problems that are specific to food safety and food labeling issues in the United States. The primary goal of the class is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamental administrative law principles applied in matters involving the regulation of food and food products, and the ability to apply these principles to problems similar to those encountered in actual practice. To the extent possible, this class will be taught from a practice-oriented approach, requiring students to engage in problem-solving exercises online.
3 Codex Alimentarius / Hegarty, P. .810F 730 97ENWN Online this course is intended for students in the Global Food Law Program 10 Take Home Exam,
This course is to familiarize students with the history, development and workings of the Codex Alimentarius Commission in formulating and harmonizing food standards and ensuring their global implementation.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in Canada / Blakney, Joh.810C 730 97ENUA Online this course is intended for students in the Global Food Law Program 10 Take Home Exam,
This course is designed for anyone who must understand the legal and regulatory complexities of the flow of food and agricultural products as they make their way from the farm gate to the grocery store shelves in Canada. This course will examine federal statutes and regulations including the Canada Agricultural Products Act, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act, the Consumer Packaging and Labeling Act, the Fish Inspection Act and the Meat Inspection Act.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in the European Union / Jukes, Dav.810B 730 97ENUB Online this course is intended for students in the Global Food Law Program 10 No Exam,
This online course enables students to study the factors influencing the development of food regulation in the EU. By making full use of the internet, students will gain access to relevant documentation in support of their professional needs and, having followed the course, students will be able to make an informed interpretation of the content.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in the U.S. / Fortin, Nea.810A 730 97ENUC Online this course is intended for students in the Global Food Law Program 10 Take Home Exam,
An online course designed for anyone who must understand the legal and regulatory complexities of the regulation of food products in the United States including issues such as food and food safety regulation, regulatory compliance, HACCP, the regulation of genetic modifications, food additive regulation, food labeling, dietary supplements, the protection of the food supply, and the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
2 Foundations of Law and Legal Research / Domann, Bre.807A 730 97ENUD January-April, 2015 Intended for students in the IP, GFL and Dubai programs 20 Take Home Exam,
This online course provides an introduction to the American legal system with a special focus on the research and writing needs of international scholars and non-lawyers (focus on American jurisprudence and Global Food Law).
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 International Food Laws and Regulations / Fortin, Nea.810D 730 97ENUR Online this course is intended for students in the Global Food Law Program 10 Take Home Exam,
The objective of this online course is to provide the student with an overview of the systems of food regulation practiced in different regions of the world including some of the cultural and social-economic factors which influence the regulation of food products in the specific region including issues such as genetic modification, importation, exportation, food additives, and regulatory compliance.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Regulation of Agricultural Production & Marketing / Oldfield, Mic.810M 730 97ENVP Online this course is intended for students in the Global Food Law Program 10 Take Home Exam,
This course highlights laws and regulations relevant to agricultural production and distribution of food. Focus is on understanding how laws and regulation influence what farmers raise, how they raise it and market it, and how that affects food quality and value. Topics include current and past methods of supporting production and profitability, agricultural production standards relevant to food products, including organics, and regulation of relationships between produces and buyers. 
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Intellectual Property - LL.M./M.J.
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Foundations of Law and Legal Research / Domann, Bre.807A 730 97ENUD January-April, 2015 Intended for students in the IP, GFL and Dubai programs 20 Online Take Home Exam,
This online course provides an introduction to the American legal system with a special focus on the research and writing needs of international scholars and non-lawyers (focus on American jurisprudence and Global Food Law).
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR