MSU College of Law

Fall 2016 Schedule

(Updated: Thursday, January 26, 2017 3:13 PM)

View schedule sorted by: Course Name, Date Modified, Groupings, Professor

Date key: M-Monday, T-Tuesday, W-Wednesday, R-Thursday, F-Friday

1st Year/Section 1
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Civil Procedure / Darden, Tif.530A 001 97HE3Y TR/1:30pm-3:10pm 90 471 12-16-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly Civil Procedure I) A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.
4 Contracts / Barnhizer, Dan.530B 001 97HE4C TR/8:25am-10:10am 95 471 12-20-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E) A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.
1 Foundations of Law / Fletcher, Mat.530K 001 97HE46 Immersion Week 90 471 08-25-2016 12:30 PM
The primary focus of this course is to provide first-year students with an introduction to the study of law, with preliminary exposure to legal reasoning, the structure of the American legal system, and fundamental legal-theoretical concepts. This course also seeks to put students who come to the law from a variety of academic backgrounds on a more equal footing.
4 Torts I / Ravitch, Fra.500R 001 97HE69 MW/10:00am-11:40am 95 472 12-12-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCl 141) The study of the protection that the law affords against interference by others with one's person, property or intangible interest. It is broadly divisible into three areas of liability: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. Specific tort actions and defenses are analyzed. Each is examined in the context of underlying social and economic factors that provide the framework in which law develops and social conflict is managed.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year/Section 2
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Civil Procedure / Pucillo, Phi.530A 002 97HE3Z MW/2:00pm-3:45pm 90 471 12-16-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly Civil Procedure I) A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.
4 Contracts / Ponoroff, Law.530B 002 97HE4D MWF/8:30am-10:00am 95 473 12-20-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E) A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.
1 Foundations of Law / Grosso, Cat.530K 002 97HE47 Immersion Week 90 472 08-25-2016 12:30 PM
The primary focus of this course is to provide first-year students with an introduction to the study of law, with preliminary exposure to legal reasoning, the structure of the American legal system, and fundamental legal-theoretical concepts. This course also seeks to put students who come to the law from a variety of academic backgrounds on a more equal footing.
4 Torts I / Payne, Kat.500R 002 97HE7A TR/10:25am-12:10pm 95 474 12-12-2016 8:30 AM **
(Formerly DCl 141) The study of the protection that the law affords against interference by others with one's person, property or intangible interest. It is broadly divisible into three areas of liability: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. Specific tort actions and defenses are analyzed. Each is examined in the context of underlying social and economic factors that provide the framework in which law develops and social conflict is managed.
Footnote(s): Midterm exam 10-18-16
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year/Section 3
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Civil Procedure / Staszewski, Gle.530A 003 97HE32 MW/8:30am-10:10am 90 474 12-16-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly Civil Procedure I) A survey of civil procedure, primarily addressing jurisdiction, venue, the Erie doctrine, pleadings, simple joinder, discovery, sanctions, summary judgment, judgment as a matter of law, and former adjudication (claim preclusion and issue preclusion). Primary emphasis is placed on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure with some potential discussion of state deviations from the federal model.
4 Contracts / Lawton, Ann.530B 003 97HE4E TR/10:30am-12:10pm 95 472 12-20-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly LAW500D and LAW500E) A study of the basic law relating to the formation of a contract. Additional topics include: the Statute of Frauds; the avoidability of contracts; performance obligations; contract breach and remedies for breach. Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code covering sales of goods will be introduced; however, the primary focus of the course is on the common law.
1 Foundations of Law / O'Brien, Bar.530K 003 97HE48 Immersion Week 90 473 08-25-2016 12:30 PM
The primary focus of this course is to provide first-year students with an introduction to the study of law, with preliminary exposure to legal reasoning, the structure of the American legal system, and fundamental legal-theoretical concepts. This course also seeks to put students who come to the law from a variety of academic backgrounds on a more equal footing.
4 Torts I / Kalt, Bri.500R 003 97HE7B TR/1:30pm-3:15pm 95 472 12-12-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCl 141) The study of the protection that the law affords against interference by others with one's person, property or intangible interest. It is broadly divisible into three areas of liability: intentional interference, negligence and strict liability. Specific tort actions and defenses are analyzed. Each is examined in the context of underlying social and economic factors that provide the framework in which law develops and social conflict is managed.
(1st year students must be enrolled in a Research and Writing Section)
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

1st Year Research and Writing
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Lawrence, Dea.530D 005 97HF82 T/8:30am-9:20am R/8:30am-10:10am See notes for exam dates 14 335 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 11:30am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Ching, Bru.530D 006 97HF83 T/8:30am-9:20am R/8:30am-10:10am See notes for exam dates 18 340 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 2:00pm
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Ching, Bru.530D 007 97HF84 T/1:30pm-2:20pm R/1:30pm-3:10pm See notes for exam dates 18 344 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 2:00pm
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Stokstad, Pau.530D 008 97HF85 W/9:00am-9:50am F/9:00am-10:40am See notes for exam dates 18 335 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 11:30am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Gentry, Kev.530D 009 97HF86 W/9:00am-9:50am F/9:00am-10:40am See notes for exam dates 14 341 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 11:30am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Stokstad, Pau.530D 010 97HF87 W/10:30am-11:20am F/11:00am-12:40pm See notes for exam dates 18 335 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 2:00pm
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Lawrence, Dea.530D 011 97HF88 R/10:30am-11:20am R/10:30am-12:10pm See notes for exam dates 14 335 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 9:00am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Spiliopoulos, Ela.530D 012 97HF89 W/10:30am-11:20am F/11:00am-12:40pm See notes for exam dates 14 345 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 2:00pm
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Spiliopoulos, Ela.530D 013 97HF9A W/9:00am-9:50am F/9:00am-10:40am See notes for exam dates 14 345 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 11:30am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / O'Regan, Dap.530D 014 97HF9B T/1:30pm-2:20pm R/1:30pm-3:10pm See notes for exam dates 14 335 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 11:30am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Gentry, Kev.530D 015 97HF9C W/10:30am-11:40am F/11:00am-12:40pm See notes for exam dates 14 341 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 2:00pm
2 Research, Writing & Analysis / Kirchner, Jes.530D 021 97HGW8 M/4:00pm-4:50pm R/3:30pm-5:10pm See notes for exam dates 14 M344 R345 **
(Formerly LAW500J) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday 10/28/16 11:;30am Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16 11:30am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective / Costello, Nan.530E 016 97HF9D R/10:30am-11:20am R/10:30am-12:10pm See notes for exam dates 18 344 **
(Formerly LAW500V) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter, with a focus on trademark, copyright and patent law
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 9:00am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective / Costello, Nan.530E 017 97HF9E T/3:30pm-4:20pm R/3:30pm-5:10pm See notes for exam dates 18 344 **
(Formerly LAW500V) Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter, with a focus on trademark, copyright and patent law
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 11:30am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Social Justice Perspectives / Rosa, Jen.530Q 018 97HF9G W/2:00pm-2:50pm F/1:00pm-2:40pm See notes for exam dates 18 325 **
This course covers the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, but the written projects focus around social justice issues. The topics of assignments may include, but are not limited to, any of the following areas of law: human rights issues, equal access to education and health care, child welfare, human trafficking, immigration, or issues surrounding the Native American community. The problems will give students an opportunity to reflect on what social justice means, and how we can utilize the justice system to achieve equity for marginalized populations. This course is for students who have an interest in social justice issues or who will likely seek positions with public interest organizations.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 9:00am
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective / LaRose, Ste.530N 019 97HF9H W/10:30am-11:20am F/11:00am-12:40pm See notes for exam dates 18 344 **
This course covers all the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, however, all of the written projects, including a closed memorandum, a client letter, and a research memorandum, are placed in the setting of criminal litigation. This course is for students who have an interest in criminal law and/or wish to produce writing samples for a position with a prosecutor or public defender's office, with a private firm that handles criminal litigation, with a state or federal appellate court, or with a trial court that handles a criminal docket.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 2:00pm
2 Research, Writing & Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective / LaRose, Ste.530N 020 97HF9J W/2:00pm-2:50pm F/1:00pm-2:40pm See notes for exam dates 18 344 **
This course covers all the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, however, all of the written projects, including a closed memorandum, a client letter, and a research memorandum, are placed in the setting of criminal litigation. This course is for students who have an interest in criminal law and/or wish to produce writing samples for a position with a prosecutor or public defender's office, with a private firm that handles criminal litigation, with a state or federal appellate court, or with a trial court that handles a criminal docket.
Footnote(s): Bluebook exam Friday, 10/28/16. Proficiency exam Friday 11/11/16. 9:00am
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Upper Level Required
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Professional Responsibility / Bullington, Cyn.500Q 301 97HE6N TR/5:45pm-7:00pm 80 471 12-15-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 260) A course designed to acquaint the law student with many of the obligations owed by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession, to the society in which he/she lives. In addition to a discussion of ethical problems involved in the practice of law, an overview of all phases of the profession will be undertaken, including disciplinary proceedings, the functions of Bar organizations and unauthorized practice. Students who have already taken Lawyer Regulation and Ethics in a Technology-Driven World may not take this course.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Electives
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Administrative Law / Sant'Ambrogio, Mic.532 001 97HE27 TR/9:00am-10:15am 80 473 12-13-2016 1:30 PM
Formerly DCL 300) This course examines the place of administrative agencies in American government, and surveys the legal rules and principles governing agency regulation, adjudication, investigation, and enforcement; agency structure; and judicial review of agency action. Students who have taken Administrative Law: Food Safety and Labeling (810K) may not take this course
2 Advanced Civil Procedure / Wittner, Nic.530T 001 97HE7R R/1:30pm-3:10pm 30 324 12-20-2016 1:30 PM
The course (a) augments the fundamentals of civil procedures taught in the Civil Procedure I class, covering recent legislation and Supreme Court jurisprudence involving subject matter and personal jurisdiction over domestic as well as international disputes and defendants; (b) explains procedures for discovery practice under the newly-amended Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, including the scope of discovery, discovery plans, and sanctions for failure to preserve electronic records; (c) reviews in greater depth the use of discovery methods, domestically and internationally; (d) describes the new judicial management requirements in federal courts under the new Rules (service of process, court scheduling orders) (e) examines choice of forum and choice of law, as well as conflict of laws (important for transactional lawyers as well as for litigators); (h) explains class action and multi-district litigation practice; and (e) discusses how to enforce judgments, domestically as well as against international defendants with overseas assets.
2 Advanced Legal Research / Bean, Bar. & Meland, Jan.586 001 97HE29 M/1:00pm-2:40pm 20 McDonel Hall room 2 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
2 Advanced Legal Research / Domann, Bre. & Hanna, Hil.586 301 97HE3A R/5:45pm-7:25pm 20 325 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 509) The course will focus on the process and goals of legal research. Special emphasis will be placed on Internet research, but instruction will be based on function rather than format. Students will learn how to find information through the Web, on Lexis and Westlaw, and in paper. By contrasting form, speed, cost and accuracy, students will learn how to integrate these sources for the most comprehensive and economical research product. Equal emphasis will be placed on conceptual structure and practical application.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing & Analysis or RWA: IP or RWA: SJ or RWA: CL and Advocacy
1 Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Microeconomics / Mercuro, Nic.509A 001 97HE3C TR/3:30pm-4:45pm 20 335 10-04-2016 3:30 PM **
(Formerly DCL 607A) Condensed principles of microeconomics to serves as a primer that provides law students the tools necessary to succeed as 'lawyers' in the various fields that use these principles.
Footnote(s): Class runs 7 weeks; August 30-September 29, 2016
Prerequisite(s): Students who have taken Law and Economics (515) may not take this course.
3 Animal Law / Favre, Dav.565A 001 97HE3E MW/2:00pm-3:15pm 20 341 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 501) A survey of animal legal issues including property status, zoning and criminal anti-cruelty laws. Additionally, legal policy issues will be discussed, such as what to do with dangerous dogs, and what level of animal welfare should be provided to agricultural animals. The distinction between animal welfare and animal rights will be considered.
3 Antitrust Law / Chen, Jam.504 001 97HE3F MW/2:00pm-3:15pm 40 345 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 310)This course will explore the role of antitrust law and analysis of restraints of trade and competition in various markets. Beginning with an analysis of the goals of antitrust law, and their operation in society, the requirements of antitrust claims will be explored through historical and current examples. Highlights will include problems in market power, monopoly, price fixing, tying, bundling, and special problems with patents. The course will include discussion of recent issues in antitrust law.
3 Basic Income Taxation / Barnhizer, Dan.501K 001 97HFA9 TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 80 474 12-20-2016 1:30 PM
This survey course introduces the basic concepts of federal income taxation and is ideal for students interested in learning basic information about tax law but who are not yet certain if they want to specialize in tax or business fields. Students will get practice in the skills of statutory construction and applying a broad range of legal authorities to clients’ concrete problems, skills which are valuable for all law students regardless of whether they ultimately specialize in tax. In this course, students will be exposed to tax issues that affect individuals, including sole proprietorships, and will gain an understanding of various forms of income, exclusions from income, capital gains and losses, various deductions, and other topics. The course uses a modified Socratic approach with an emphasis on problem solving that will allow students to develop facility in analyzing cases, statutes, and administrative materials. Sample examination questions are provided to allow a student to determine how well he or she learned and retained the material. The grade in the course is based on a final examination with consideration given to class participation. Students who enroll in Basic Income Taxation for 2 credits are ineligible to enroll in Basic Income Taxation for 3 credits.
3 Basic Will Drafting / Behan, Mic.540A 301 97HE3G TR/5:45pm-7:00pm 18 335 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 391) This course is designed to familiarize students with the interviewing function and the drafting of wills and other basic estate planning vehicles for clients whose estates are not subject to federal estate tax. An evaluation of usable forms and discussion of when and how to use them intelligently will be a focus of the course. A client interview and drafting exercises, including an entire basic estate plan, are contemplated.
Prerequisite(s): Decedents' Estates and Trusts
2 Biotechnology Law Seminar / Carter-Johnson, Jen.558S 001 97HE3H M/2:00pm-3:40pm 20 335 Final Paper, U
This seminar will examine some of the many ways that biotechnology impacts the law as well as the ways that the law has impacted the growth of biotechnology. Current biotechnology innovations or controversies will be used to explore the impacts of this technology on a selection of legal topics which may include intellectual property, business, federal regulations, property, criminal law, indigenous law, evidence, bioethics and international law. No science background is required for the course.
4 Business Enterprises / Bean, Bru.500M 001 97HE3J MW/2:00pm-3:40pm 60 472 12-19-2016 8:30 AM
This course deals with issues relating to common forms of business organization, including corporations, limited liability companies and closely held corporations. The four credit version of Business Enterprises also includes an introduction to mergers and acquisitions.
3 Business Enterprises / Bean, Bru.500M 002 97HE3K MW/2:00pm-3:40pm 35 472 12-19-2016 8:30 AM **
This course deals with issues relating to common forms of business organization, including corporations, limited liability companies and closely held corporations. The four credit version of Business Enterprises also includes an introduction to mergers and acquisitions.
Footnote(s): This 3 credit section meets from 8-29-16 to 11-14-16.
4 Business Enterprises / Walther, Ben.500M 003 97HE3M TR/3:30pm-5:10pm 80 473 12-21-2016 1:30 PM
This course deals with issues relating to common forms of business organization, including corporations, limited liability companies and closely held corporations. The four credit version of Business Enterprises also includes an introduction to mergers and acquisitions.
2 Business, Securities and Tax Planning / Meurlin, Cra.507 001 97HE3N T/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 340 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 440) The course will deal with problems of corporations and, to a lesser extent, partnerships in the areas of organization, allocation of control, issuance of securities, use of debt and equity financing, dividends, acquisitions and sales of businesses, liquidation and dissolution, and mergers. Some drafting and legal research will be involved. The course will be taught both by lecture and through student participation. EITHER Basic Income Tax A or Basic Income Tax B AND Business Enterprises fulflls the prerequisite.
Prerequisite(s): Basic Income Taxation A, Basic Income Taxation B, Business Enterprises
1 Capstone Intellectual Property and Communications Law Seminar / Candeub, Ada. & Carter-Johnson, Jen.535E 001 97HE3P T/3:30pm-4:20pm 10 324 No Exam,
This course uses presentations by leading scholars of their works-in-progress in the area of IP and communications law. Students will be responsible for reading the papers, writing a critique, preparing questions and participating in the seminar.. This course is highly recommended for all students who wish to write a ULWR or law review note in intellectual property, information, or communications law in a subsequent semester.
0 Capstone Intellectual Property and Communications Law Seminar / Candeub, Ada. & Carter-Johnson, Jen.535E 002 97HE3R T/3:30pm-4:20pm 10 324 Final Paper, U **
This course uses presentations by leading scholars of their works-in-progress in the area of IP and communications law. Students will be responsible for reading the papers, writing a critique, preparing questions and participating in the seminar.. This course is highly recommended for all students who wish to write a ULWR or law review note in intellectual property, information, or communications law in a subsequent semester.
Footnote(s): Class continues with paper due Spring 2017 for 2 credits.
2 Client Counseling and Interviewing / Winegarden, J. .591A 301 97HE36 W/6:00pm-7:40pm 16 335 Take Home Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 450) This course adopts a client-centered approach in looking at legal problems and examines how to make clients partners in problem solving. Attention is paid to the economic, social and psychological aspects of clients' legal problems. The course starts with an examination of fundamental counseling skills, followed by an analysis of the information gathering process and ultimate decision making. Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Evidence
4 Constitutional Law II / Lawrence, Mic.500N 001 97HE39 TR/8:30am-10:10am 80 472 12-13-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 172) A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
4 Constitutional Law II / Kuykendall, Mae.500N 301 97HE4A TR/5:45pm-7:25pm 80 472 12-15-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 172) A study of procedural and substantive due process of law, equal protection of the laws and the Bill of Rights, including freedom of expression.
2 Constitutional Law Topics: Free Expression / Saunders, Kev.551B 001 97HE4B M/10:25am-12:13pm 20 335 Final Paper, U
(Formlery DCL 554) The course focuses on the theory and history of speech.
2 Construction Law / Deneweth, Ron.601 301 97HF8U T/5:45pm-7:25pm 15 341 12-14-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 314) A survey of legal issues with respect to the construction industry. Topics discussed include bid errors, contract disputes, and payment issues. Students will be given an overview of project delivery systems, and the contract clauses found in proprietary and industry standard contract documents. Suretyship and mechanic's lien laws are an integral part of the course.
3 Criminal Procedure: Adjudication / O'Brien, Bar.616C 001 97HE4G MW/8:30am-9:45am 80 471 12-14-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure II) This course examines various issues associated with criminal adjudications with a focus on federal constitutional rights. The course covers issues such as the exercise of prosecutorial discretion, bail and pretrial detention, discovery, the plea bargaining process, speedy trial rights, federal sentencing guidelines, and post-conviction review. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Criminal Procedure: Investigation in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure II are ineligible to enroll in this course.
3 Criminal Procedure: Investigation / Totten, Mar.616B 001 97HE4H MW/10:30am-11:45am 80 473 12-12-2016 1:30 PM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
3 Criminal Procedure: Investigation / Grosso, Cat.616B 002 97HE4J MW/8:30am-9:45am 80 472 12-14-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly Criminal Procedure I)This course provides students with an introduction to federal constitutional limits on police investigation under the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments. This includes the governance of search and interrogation, and the right to counsel. Students can take Criminal Procedure: Investigation and Criminal Procedure: Adjudication in any order or at the same time. Students who have taken Criminal Procedure I are ineligible to enroll in this course.
2 Criminal Trial Advocacy - PreTrial / Kaplan, Ste.617A 301 97HE4K R/5:45pm-7:25pm 40 346 12-15-2016 6:00 PM E S
(Formerly Criminal Trial I: Pre-Trial) This practical course is designed to familiarize the student with the criminal justice process. The course consists of lectures and exercises covering criminal case initiation, the initial appearance, indictments, plea negotiations, pretrial discovery and pretrial motions leading up to up to a trial. Special emphasis will be placed on criminal procedure. Because this course duplicates the content of courses in the Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute program, students in the FTPI may not receive academic credit for this course. the Criminal Trial Advocacy classes are not sequential and may be taken in any order.
Prerequisite(s): Criminal Law
3 Dispute Resolution in the Workplace / Bedikian, Mar.505D 001 97HE28 TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 45 346 Take Home Exam, S
(Formerly ADR in the Workplace) Arbitration of disputes arising out of collective bargaining agreements has come to be the model for resolving statutory and common law disputes that arise in the nonunion workplace. Growing reliance on mediation and arbitration hybrids alters the role of advocates and even the definition of employee's legal rights. This course will focus on a wide range of topics-arbitrability determinations, injunctions, duty of fair representation, the doctrine of deferral, the role of external law and whether arbitrators should follow the federal law, the role of precedent in labor and employment law, discipline and discharge, past practice, seniority, management rights, subcontracting, union security agreements and their enforceability, and arbitration in the public sector. We will also examine the current criticism of labor arbitration-its efficiency, honesty and underlying ideology. Finally, we will cover the spectrum of topics associated with individual employment arbitration-judicial application of "Gilmer" and its progeny, the merits and demerits of compulsory arbitration, grievance mediation, and peer review systems.
1 Effective Legal Analysis & Process / Pritchard, Gol. & Short, Meg.530P 001 97HE4P M/4:00pm-5:00pm 15 345 No Exam, P
The purpose of this course is to build the critical skills necessary to succeed in law school and on the bar exam. Various hands-on activities will help students master skills such as careful reading, issue spotting, structuring an answer, managing time, balancing the analysis of a close question, and taking both multiple choice and essay tests.
2 Election Law / Wiener, Ric.579E 301 97HE4R R/5:45pm-7:25pm 40 345 12-15-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 318) This course involves the study of election issues, including voting; redistricting; candidacy, ballots and ballot access; party organization; initiative, referendum and recall; campaign finance; and recounts.
3 Estates and Future Interests Drafting Seminar / Johnson, Cla.540C 001 97HE4S TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 20 341 12-20-2016 1:30 PM E
(Formerly DCL 491) This is a three (3) hour course with enrollment limited to 15 students. The course is designed to provide an understanding of estates and future interests and how they are used in property transfers. Focus is on intensive in-class drafting of the carefully crafted language necessary for the creation of the various interests by deed, will or trust. The legal and practical consequences of each of the interests created are also studied. It is believed that the in-class drafting component makes for a greater comprehension of the materials. Accordingly, class attendance is strongly encouraged. The course will have a written final examination. The subject matter of the course is one of examination both on the Multistate Bar Examination and many state essay examinations, including the Michigan Bar Examination. The course should have particular appeal to those who may practice in the areas of real estate law or estate planning.
4 Evidence / Bitensky, Sus.500P 001 97HE4T TR/1:30pm-3:10pm 80 473 12-20-2016 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 220) A study of the means and methods of proof or disproof of a proposition as either permitted, required or prohibited under the Anglo-American system of jurisprudence. The rules respecting problems of remoteness and prejudice of evidence, circumstantial proof, the employment of writings, their authentication and proof of their contents. A study in depth of hearsay evidence and its status in the evidence. A thorough inquiry into the so-called "evidential preferences" of our legal system and the deficiencies of hearsay evidence as related to these preferences.
3 Family Law: Marriage & Divorce / Starnes, Cyn.541E 001 97HE4U TR/10:30am-11:45am 80 473 12-15-2016 8:30 AM S
(Formerly Family Law I: Marriage & Divorce) This course examines laws governing entry into marriage, access to divorce, the economics of divorce (property distribution, alimony and child support), child custody, premarital agreements, and cohabitation. Students may take Family Law: Marriage & Divorce and Family Law: Child, Family, and State in any order or at the same time.
3 Family Law: Marriage & Divorce / Starnes, Cyn.541E 002 97HE4V TR/3:30pm-4:45pm 80 471 12-15-2016 8:30 AM S
(Formerly Family Law I: Marriage & Divorce) This course examines laws governing entry into marriage, access to divorce, the economics of divorce (property distribution, alimony and child support), child custody, premarital agreements, and cohabitation. Students may take Family Law: Marriage & Divorce and Family Law: Child, Family, and State in any order or at the same time.
3 Federal Jurisdiction / McKeague, Dav.579G 001 97HE4X MW/9:00am-10:15am 24 340 12-14-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 349) The focus of this course is the operation of the federal court system. It will cover not only the usual bases of federal court jurisdiction, such as diversity, federal questions and removal, but also other doctrines that impact federal courts, including standing, ripeness, mootness, abstention and state sovereign immunity. Significant attention will be focused on federal litigation under the Civil Rights Acts. This course will be of benefit to those intending to practice in federal courts and to those seeking a federal court clerkship.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure
3 Federal Law and Indian Tribes / Fletcher, Mat.635B 001 97HE4Y MW/9:00am-10:15am 20 344 12-14-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly DCL 486) An examination of the law and policy of the United States regarding Indian tribes and their citizen members. Study the relationships between the federal, state, and tribal governments; and examine the source and scope of federal, state and tribal authority in Indian Country
2 Food and Drug Law / Card-Abela, Mel.558B 001 97HE4Z R/1:30pm-3:10pm 20 325 Final Paper,
(Formerly DCL 357) This course is designed to provide a basic working knowledge of domestic laws regulating food, drugs, cosmetics, biologics/blood and medical devices. It has an administrative overtone, providing an understanding of the legislative and regulatory processes through an in-depth look at the relationship between the FDA, industry, consumer interest groups and Congress.
2 Government Relations and Lobbying Law / Pirich, Joh.551D 001 97HE5B T/10:30am-12:10pm 20 340 Final Paper,
This course provides an overview of governmental relations and lobbying law. It will address topics such as compliance with state and federal statutes and regulations that govern the practice and ethics of lobbying. The course will explore distinctions among legislative, administrative and grassroots lobbying and the professional norms of appropriate behavior that apply to lobbyists.
2 Hospitality Law / Deacon, Bra. & Ten Brink, Cha.605A 301 97HE5F M/6:00pm-7:40pm 25 346 Final Paper, S
Students learn to identify and manage the legal issues raised by clients providing lodging, food, and alcohol to the public, with a focus on entrepreneurship and small business models, and particular attention to the intersection of local, state, and federal regulation. Topics would include choice of business form, duties to guests and others, food and alcohol regulation, lodging and land use regulation. The course will include several case studies requiring students to consider clients’ business plans and provide appropriate legal analysis and advice.
Prerequisite(s): Torts (Law 500R) and Contracts (Law 530B)
3 Immigration Law / Thronson, Dav.541G 001 97HE5M TR/9:00am-10:15am 40 325 12-13-2016 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 353) This course provides a general overview of U.S. immigration law and policy. The course will examine the admission, exclusion, deportation and naturalization of noncitizens in the United States, from constitutional foundations to daily practice issues. The course also will explore the rights of immigrants in employment, education, and public benefits, and will analyze the interaction of immigration law with other areas of law such as criminal law.
3 Information Privacy and Security Law / Candeub, Ada.535P 001 97HE5R MW/2:00pm-3:15pm 45 346 12-19-2016 8:30 AM
Examines the regulation of information flow with particular attention to statutory and compliance issues. Topics include the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Stored Communications Act, and the Banking Secrecy Act. The course is designed to prepare students to take the privacy certification examinations offered by the International Association of Privacy Professionals. Note: Students who have taken Cyber Law (533C) are not permitted to enroll in this course.
3 Integrative Law & Social Work / Kozakiewicz, Jos.541J 001 97HE5S M/9:00am-11:30am 20 345 No Exam, S
(Formerly DCL 474) The Integrative Law and Social Work Seminar is offered only to law students and second year master-level social work students accepted into the one-year Chance at Childhood Program which begins each fall semester. The spring course is a continuation of this two semester seminar that is part of the Chance at Childhood Certificate Program. The certificate program is designed to strengthen the knowledge base, practice and advocacy skills of law students and master-level social work students interested in working with abused, neglected and at-risk children and families. The seminar emphasizes select issues related to child abuse and neglect from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Major: CHLD. Must be in the Child and Family Advocacy Certificate program.
3 Intellectual Property Survey / Pager, Sea.535D 001 97HE5T TR/1:30pm-2:45pm 40 345 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 321 and LAW 533V) Formerly known as Intellectual Property Law. This course could be offered for 2 or 3 credits. This course is a survey of all Intellectual Property law, including patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secret law. No technical degree is necessary.
Prerequisite(s): This course is not open to students who have taken 2 of the 3 following courses: Copyright Law, Patent Law, or Trademark Law and Unfair Competition Law.
3 International Trade Regulation / Reifenberg, Jr., Joh.512E 001 97HE5W TR/9:00am-10:15am 40 345 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 368) The course has as its primary focus the international trade regime of the World Trade Organization to which the United States and 144 other countries are parties. The following topics are covered in this course: - Introduction: Why trade? Why not protect? - An overview of the GATT-WTO system - WTO dispute settlement - The unconditional, most-favored-nation obligation - Tariff bindings - The national treatment obligation - The prohibition on quantitative restrictions (quotas) - Transparency of national laws and regulations - Regional trade arrangements (customs unions and free trade areas) - Special and differential treatment of developing countries - Trade in agricultural goods, including farm subsidies - Trade and the environment - Human, animal, and plant health and safety issues - Trade and labor rights - The General Agreement on Trade in Services - The Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights - The new agenda: trade and investment, trade and competition policy
3 Jurisprudence / Fletcher, Mat.579J 001 97HFJK MW/4:00pm-5:15pm 20 340 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 385) This course surveys several views of law and the legal process. It also examines the judicial decision-making process and the social, political and moral contexts that influence and are influenced by judicial decision.
2 King Scholars Jurisprudence / Saunders, Kev.626C 001 97HE5X M/4:00pm-5:48pm 20 341 No Exam, P
(Formerly DCL 359) Prerequisite: King Scholar A course in jurisprudence available to King Scholars as part of the King Scholarship Program. Students entering with a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Jurisprudence class during their third semester at the Law College. Matriculating students receiving a King Scholarship must enroll for the King Scholars Jurisprudence class in their next regular semester.
3 Labor Law / Bedikian, Mar.511D 001 97HE5Z TR/10:30am-11:45am 40 345 12-16-2016 1:30 PM S
(Formerly DCL 382) This is a basic labor law course exploring the application of the National Labor Relations Act as amended. Subjects include the jurisdiction, organization and procedures of the National Labor Relations Board; the protection of the right of self-organization; company domination of or assistance to the union; discrimination against employees; remedies for unfair labor practices; review of the procedures for selection of representatives for the purposes of collective bargaining; securing bargaining rights through unfair labor practice procedures; and the law concerning negotiation of collective bargaining agreements, including the subjects of collective bargaining, strikes, boycotts and picketing under the common law and the act.
3 Land Use Planning / Ten Brink, Cha.566B 001 97HE52 MW/10:30am-11:45am 40 325 12-19-2016 1:30 PM S
(Formerly DCL 401) THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS. Explores the principal methods of local government control of land use, with special emphasis on the theory and practice of zoning and eminent domain. Analyzes judicial response, through the use of nuisance and "takings" doctrines, to local land use planning efforts.
Prerequisite(s): Property
3 Law and Religion / Ravitch, Fra.579K 001 97HE53 MW/4:00pm-5:15pm 45 346 12-15-2016 1:30 PM
(Formerly DCL 530) This course will focus on church/state law -- the legal doctrines that have arisen in cases under the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. The course will explore the role of law in various religious traditions and the role of religion in law and public discourse. Topics addressed include school prayer, government aid to religious institutions (including school vouchers and charitable choice), government endorsement of religious symbols, the role of public forum doctrine in religion cases, freedom of religious expression, and the freedom to practice one's religion.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Rosa, Jen.625D 730 97HGZG Online 5 No Exam,
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
0 Law Externship Seminar / Rosa, Jen.625D 001 97HGZF W/6:00pm-7:40pm 12 325 No Exam,
Classroom component for students enrolled in an externship.
3 Litigation: Data, Theory, Practice, Process / Linna Jr., Dan.537M 001 97HE55 MW/4:00pm-5:15pm 40 473 No Exam, S
The primary goal of this class is for students to learn how to leverage data, theory, and process to obtain better results in litigation. Students will explore sources of data and the use of decision theory, game theory, and economic analysis to evaluate claims, predict outcomes, and improve litigation strategies. The litigation process will be deconstructed beyond the mechanics of procedural rules and into the specific tasks lawyers must perform. Deconstructing the litigation process allows lawyers to properly staff matters, complete tasks more efficiently, and demonstrate the marginal return on investment for each task. Students will also learn a number of practical skills necessary to be an effective litigator. Among the topics addressed are early case assessment, client counseling, settlement negotiations, drafting persuasive pleadings and motions, managing discovery, persuading the fact finder, managing litigation projects, budgeting, and developing effective value-added litigation strategies.
3 Matrimonial Practice / Bank, Mar. & Rifkin, B. .541M 001 97HE56 F/9:00am-11:40am 16 474 12-14-2016 1:30 PM E S
(Formerly DCL 532) This course provides the practical knowledge and skills necessary to develop expertise in handling matrimonial matters from initial client contact through each step of the proceedings, including Motion Practice and Temporary Orders, Discovery, Custody, Equitable Distribution, Support, Negotiations/Settlement, Mediation, and Settlement Drafting.
3 Mediation Advocacy and Civil Facilitative Mediator Training / Pappas, Bri.587E 001 97HE7T Aug. 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 2016 / 8:00am-5:00pm 74 TBDE S **
This course meets the civil facilitative mediator training requirement as required by Michigan Court Rule and the Michigan State Court Administrative Office (SCAO). With this training, and the completion of additional requirements, students will be able to apply for inclusion on court mediation rosters. The course includes a variety of graded assignments, including drafting an agreement to mediate (with adequate confidentiality provisions), a post-mediation agreement (with mediation clause), and a mediation representation plan. By balancing theory with practice and paying particular attention to mediation ethics, students completing this course will be prepared to both mediate civil cases and effectively advocate for clients in mediation. Students who have taken Mediation Advocacy and Domestic Relations Mediator Training may not take this course.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by lottery. Contact Prof. Pappas by Thursday, April 14, 2016 for consideration pappasb@law.msu.edu . This training course is strongly recommended for those students considering applying to the Conflict Resolution Clinic in the future.
2 Michigan Civil Procedure / Lauderbach, Jon.593A 301 97HE58 M/6:00pm-7:40pm 30 325 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 438) This course is a survey of Michigan civil procedure at the trial and appellate levels. The purpose of the course is to acquaint students who intend to practice in Michigan with the nuances of state procedural law. Focus will be placed on the differences between the Michigan court rules and the federal rules of civil procedure. Also, the subject matter jurisdiction of the various courts within the state system, as well as Michigan's long-arm statute, will be examined.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Procedure I, Civil Procedure II
2 Moot Court Competition (Class) / Copland, Jen.627A 001 97HE59 T/1:30pm-3:10pm 26 325 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 700) An intramural Moot Court Competition open to all students after their first year. Students who wish to continue in the Moot Court Program must elect Moot Court Competition (Class) during their third semester. The class is a prerequisite for inter-school competition and staff positions.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Moot Court Competition (Class) / Zimbelman, Jes.627A 301 97HFAW T/5:45pm-7:25pm 26 345 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 700) An intramural Moot Court Competition open to all students after their first year. Students who wish to continue in the Moot Court Program must elect Moot Court Competition (Class) during their third semester. The class is a prerequisite for inter-school competition and staff positions.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
2 Moot Court Competition (Class) / Copland, Jen.627A 002 97HE6A W/8:30am-10:10am 26 346 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 700) An intramural Moot Court Competition open to all students after their first year. Students who wish to continue in the Moot Court Program must elect Moot Court Competition (Class) during their third semester. The class is a prerequisite for inter-school competition and staff positions.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
3 Natural Resources Law / Singel, Wen.566C 001 97HE6C MW/10:30am-11:45am 24 340 Final Paper, U **
(Formerly DCL 463) This course will explore the legal regimes under which public natural resources are allocated and managed. In addition, this course will consider the laws governing federal public lands, which constitute one-third of the nation. Special attention will be given to the costs and benefits of resources development and conservation, and to the philosophical, historical and constitutional underpinnings of natural resources law and policy. Resources studied will include forests, minerals, oil and gas, rangeland, recreation, water, wilderness and wildlife.
Footnote(s): This class is offered every other year.
2 Negotiation / Basta, Jos.591C 002 97HF5F W/2:00pm-3:40pm 16 335 Take Home Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 520) This course introduces principles of negotiation. Students will be required to engage in multiple mock negotiations, with frequent feedback from the instructor.
2 Patent Application Preparation / English, Tre.533J 301 97HE6G T/5:45pm-7:25pm 20 344 Final Paper, E S
(Formerly DCL 556) This course provides a structure and methodology for preparing a universal patent application suitable for filing in patent offices throughout the world. The course provides: 1) application drafting tools for implementing the requirements of Sections 102, 103 and 112 of Title 35, USC; 2) procedures in drafting the application to avoid issues raised in many litigated patents; 3) steps to be taken before actually drafting the application including inventor interview and searching; and 4) actual drafting of a patent application. An engineering or equivalent degree is recommended, i.e., the technical background required to take the patent agents examination to practice before the US Patent Office. PREREQUISITES OR TAKEN CONCURRENTLY: Intellectual Property Law OR Patent Law OR approval of faculty program chair.
Prerequisite(s): Intellectual Property Law, Patent Law
3 Patent Law / Carter-Johnson, Jen.533K 001 97HE6H MW/10:30am-11:45am 45 346 Take Home Exam,
(Formerly DCL 564) This course provides a general introduction to patent law, introducing students to the basic legal rules and policies that constitute this important field of intellectual property law. Subjects covered include claim interpretation and patentable subject matter. Students will then spend the majority of the course studying the specific requirements for a valid patent, including the utility, written description, enablement, novelty, and non-obviousness requirements. Patent litigation topics such as infringement, defenses and damages will be covered as time permits. The course will focus on the new America Invents Act (AIA) but will also incorporate older rules as many currently existing patents will be analyzed under pre-AIA standards for the foreseeable future. Although patent cases often involve complicated scientific discoveries or technologies, the essential legal principles or policies rarely depend on understanding the underlying science or technology. Accordingly, students with non-technical backgrounds are encouraged to take this course, particularly given that intellectual property assets, such as patents, are increasingly important to commercial clients the world over.
2 Payment Systems / Johnson, Cla.501G 001 97HE6J TR/9:00am-9:50am 45 346 12-13-2016 1:30 PM
This course examines negotiable instruments under Article 3, bank deposits and collections pursuant to Article 4, funds transfers under Article 4A, and letters of credit under Article 5 of the UCC. The course also will cover various federal regulations, including those providing rules on check clearing, electronic fund transfers, and improper credit card use. Students who have taken commercial Transactions (LAW 501C) may be ineligible to take this course, so approval from the professor must be obtained to enroll.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II
3 Products Liability / Wittner, Nic.522 001 97HE6M MW/10:30am-11:45am 30 324 12-12-2016 1:30 PM S **
(Formerly DCL 514) This course will focus on the fundamentals of product liability law practical skills. It examines cutting edge issues that product liability trial lawyers deal with every day in litigation including automotive, pharmaceutical, medical device, consumer products, and toxic tort cases, with an emphasis on automotive design defect litigation that forms a major part of the law. Real-life, current major cases in litigation will be used so that students will be exposed to how product liability litigation is managed. Students will analyze federal legislation and recent case law, including U.S. Supreme Court decisions, learn about regulatory agencies such as NHTSA, FDA and the CPSC, and consider how regulatory agency rules and regulations have a substantial impact on product development and litigation. Students will develop expertise in important topics including expert witness testimony; complex demonstrative exhibits like accident reconstruction, biomechanics, and crash testing; federal preemption; and punitive damages. The course will also cover what companies must do to promote product safety and avoid potential civil and criminal liability. This course provides the perspective of a professor experienced in international product liability law who managed high-exposure litigation and advised clients about liability prevention during product development. The course will equip students with the skills needed to prosecute or defend product liability litigation and also to counsel manufactures to avoid help litigation. The class uses an interactive discussion and is highlighted by distinguished guest speakers and the use of high-technology classroom capabilities, including video-conferences with actual expert witnesses.
Footnote(s): First 10 class sessions will end at 12:00pm.
3 Public International Law / Reifenberg, Jr., Joh.548N 001 97HFAK TR/3:30pm-4:45pm 45 346 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 341) This course involves the study of the international legal system, sources and organizations. It also examines the relationship of individuals and states in international law and transnational legal and economic problems.
2 Regulating Environmental Risk / Morag-Levine, Nog.566Q 001 97HE6S W/4:00pm-5:40pm 30 325 Final Paper, U
This course examines regulatory responses to environmental and other risks to human life and health. It aims to familiarize students with the particular challenges regulators face in responding to such risks, and the spectrum of regulatory choices available to them. Topics to be covered include: Judicial v. administrative regulation of risk, risk assessment and risk management, direct and indirect regulation, cost-benefit analysis, the precautionary principle, and environmental justice. The course will analyze the range of policy, political, and legal-cultural factors behind current American approaches to the regulation of environmental risk. 
3 Remedies / Roberts, Jar.593D 301 97HE6T MW/6:00pm-7:15pm 80 473 12-14-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 423) This course provides an overview of the main types of remedies available in the American legal system following a determination of liability for violation of contract, tort, property, or constitutional law. The course will cover monetary damages, equitable relief, and examine the implications of choosing particular remedies, when such choice is available.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I
3 Sales and Leases / Spoon, Ell.501F 001 97HE6V MW/4:00pm-5:15pm 80 472 12-15-2016 1:30 PM
This course examines the information and terms, as well as remedies for breach, of contracts for sales of goods, under Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). The course also examines Article 2A's provisions on leases and provides an overview of the similarities and differences between Article 2 of the UCC and the United Nations Convention on the International Sale of Goods. Other topics that the course may cover include documents of title under Article 7 of the UCC, Magnuson Moss Warranty Act, or the Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act (UCITA). Students who have taken Commercial Transactions (LAW 501C) may be ineligible to take this course, so approval from the professor must be obtained to enroll.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I, Contracts II
2 Secured Transactions / Payne, Kat.501E 001 97HE6W T/3:30pm-5:10pm 80 474 12-21-2016 1:30 PM **
(Formerly DCL 240) Covers the process of financing the sale of goods, the secured transaction under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, including creation, perfection, priority of security interests in personal property and default procedures.
Footnote(s): Midterm exam will be Tuesday, October 18, 2016 during the normal class time.
3 Securities Regulation I / Spoon, Ell.524B 001 97HE6X MW/10:30am-11:45am 80 471 12-12-2016 1:30 PM S
(Formerly DCL 428) This course examines the registration requirements applicable to public offers of securities under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Michigan Blue Sky Law. Primary emphasis will be placed upon the various types of securities that are subject to registration and the exemptions from registration requirements. In addition, the course will explore, in further depth, the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. Business Enterprises may be taken concurrently.
Prerequisite(s): Business Enterprises
2 Seminar in Race, Law and American Culture: From Slavery to Post Civil Rights / Kuykendall, Mae.541S 001 97HE6Y W/4:00pm-5:40pm 20 335 Final Paper, U
This course examines race history in the United States, with primary reference to the culture and the law affecting African-Americans from slavery to post-Civil Rights. The objective of the course is to provide insight of the evolution of legal doctrine relating to race, examining and critically analyzing continuities and discontinuities; and equip students with the ability to debate, as lawyers and public citizens, the contemporary issues in race relations, with reference to the history of all racial and ethnic minorities and the complications of increasing diversity in racial, ethnic, and cultural traditions in the U.S.
3 Strategic International Transactions / Bean, Bru.512G 001 97HE6Z T/3:30pm-6:00pm 20 325 Final Paper, U
This course introduces students to an array of contemporary issues which can be encountered in cross border transactions, including acquisitions, joint ventures and foreign direct investment, project finance, international equity financing transactions, overseas activities of NGOs, etc. The course will discuss broad questions relating to international transactions generally, such as corruption, money laundering, currency risk, political upheavals, dispute resolution, etc. Students select a current international topic or question of particular interest to research and will make a formal presentation of their paper.
2 Tax Policy Seminar / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.572D 001 97HE65 T/3:30pm-5:10pm 20 341 Final Paper, U **
(Formerly DCl 517) This seminar covers a range of tax policy issues arising from Federal Taxation. The specific issues studied will vary but, in general, will focus on progressivity and redistribution. Topics likely to be covered include: the use of the income tax as a fiscal policy tool; the concept of income; imputed income; progressive versus flat tax rates; taxation of families; income versus consumption taxation; tax expenditures, exclusions, and deductions; taxation of business and investment income; capital gains and losses; and transfer or wealth taxes. A paper will be required. The topic will be determined after consultation with the instructor.
Footnote(s): Prereq waived, contact RO for override.
0 Technology Enhanced Trial Advocacy / Kipp, Bon.623G 001 97HE66 M/4:00pm-5:40pm 10/17/16 to 12/5/16 16 324 No Exam,
In lieu of tuition, a fee that is not covered by an MSU Law scholarship is assessed for this course. Contact the Trial Practice Institute office at 517-432-6969 to obtain the fee amount. This lab provides hands on training in the efficient uses of courtroom technology and the presentation of electronic evidence. The primary objective of the lab is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to efficiently use electronic evidence in pre-trial and trial litigation. Students enrolled in the Trail Practice Institute are given priority enrollment. 
0 Technology Enhanced Trial Advocacy / Kipp, Bon.623G 002 97HE67 T/1:30pm-3:10pm 8/30/16 to 10/11/16 16 324 No Exam,
In lieu of tuition, a fee that is not covered by an MSU Law scholarship is assessed for this course. Contact the Trial Practice Institute office at 517-432-6969 to obtain the fee amount. This lab provides hands on training in the efficient uses of courtroom technology and the presentation of electronic evidence. The primary objective of the lab is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to efficiently use electronic evidence in pre-trial and trial litigation. Students enrolled in the Trail Practice Institute are given priority enrollment. 
3 Trial Practice Institute - Trial I / Aquilina, Ros.623D 301 97HE7C R/5:45pm-8:15pm 16 428 Oral Exam, E S **
(Formerly DCL 534) Must be in the Trial Practice Institutue program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Footnote(s): Final trial Dec. 2-4
3 Trial Practice Institute - Trial I / Payok, Mat.623D 302 97HE7D T/5:45pm-8:15pm 16 428 Oral Exam, E S **
(Formerly DCL 534) Must be in the Trial Practice Institutue program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
Footnote(s): Final trial Dec. 2-4
3 Trial Practice Institute: Pre-Trial I / Sherman, Ann.623B 301 97HE7G M/5:45pm-8:15pm 16 428 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 506) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
3 Trial Practice Institute: Pre-Trial I / McNally, Ver.623B 001 97HE7F MW/10:30am-11:45am 16 428 No Exam, E S
(Formerly DCL 506) Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
1 Trial Practice Institute: Trial Practicum / McNally, Ver.623J 001 97HE7H M/2:00pm-3:40pm 10/17/16 to 12/5/16 16 428 No Exam, E **
This course will provide the foundation for trial work to all TPI students, but is designed for TPI students who do not have advocacy experience through the Moot Court & Trial Advocacy Board (Board). The course includes instruction on the component parts of a trial, such as opening statement, direct examination, cross examination, and closing argument. It also explores introducing exhibits, impeachment, the mechanics of refreshing recollection, and the recorded recollection hearsay exception. It will also provide students with an opportunity to refine these skills on their feet.
Footnote(s): This section for TPI students only. No class 10/31/16.
1 Trial Practice Institute: Trial Practicum / McNally, Ver.623J 002 97HE7J M/2:00pm-3:55pm 8/29/16 to 10/10/16 19 428 No Exam, E **
This course will provide the foundation for trial work to all TPI students, but is designed for TPI students who do not have advocacy experience through the Moot Court & Trial Advocacy Board (Board). The course includes instruction on the component parts of a trial, such as opening statement, direct examination, cross examination, and closing argument. It also explores introducing exhibits, impeachment, the mechanics of refreshing recollection, and the recorded recollection hearsay exception. It will also provide students with an opportunity to refine these skills on their feet.
Footnote(s): This section for non-TPI students only.
1 Trial Practice Institute: Trial Practicum / McNally, Ver.623J 003 97HE7K T/1:30pm-3:25pm 10/18/16 to 12/6/16 16 428 No Exam, E **
This course will provide the foundation for trial work to all TPI students, but is designed for TPI students who do not have advocacy experience through the Moot Court & Trial Advocacy Board (Board). The course includes instruction on the component parts of a trial, such as opening statement, direct examination, cross examination, and closing argument. It also explores introducing exhibits, impeachment, the mechanics of refreshing recollection, and the recorded recollection hearsay exception. It will also provide students with an opportunity to refine these skills on their feet.
Footnote(s): This section for TPI students.
2 Trial Practice Institute: Expert and Scientific Evidence / Payok, Mat.623F 301 97HE7E MW/6:00pm-7:40pm 8/29/16 to 10/17/16 32 474 10-24-2016 6:00 PM
(Formerly DCL 543) This course will present students with a discussion of the nature of forensic science and scientific evidence. Topics include: forensic science, scientific evidence, admissibility of scientific evidence, quality assurance and control. There will also be lectures on certain areas of forensic science that are often the subject of litigation. These include DNA, inferential statistics, traffic accident reconstruction, forensic engineering, forensic pathology, paternity testing and drunk driving. The course meets for 4 hours per week for 7 weeks. Must be in the Trial Practice Institute program. Because certain non-TPI courses duplicate the content of this course, students may not also receive academic credit for the following courses: Applied Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Trial Advocacy II, Client Counseling and Interviewing, Criminal Trial Advocacy I - Pre-Trial, Criminal Trial Advocacy II - Trial II.
3 Trusts and Estates / Blankfein-Tabachnick, Dav.501D 001 97HE7M TR/10:30am-11:45am 80 471 12-16-2016 1:30 PM
(Formerly Decedents' Estates and Trusts) A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
3 Trusts and Estates / Jacobs, Mel.501D 002 97HE7N TR/8:30am-9:45am 80 474 12-13-2016 8:30 AM
(Formerly Decedents' Estates and Trusts) A study of the pattern of practices for transmitting wealth in view of death. The course surveys probate jurisdiction and administration; intestate succession; limitations on testamentary power; execution requirements for wills; revocation, revalidation and revival of wills; incorporation by reference; contest of wills and related remedies. Also covered are the private express trust, inter vivos and testamentary, including functions, prohibited trust purposes and requisites for creation; informal and incomplete trusts, including resulting, constructive and savings bank trusts; termination of trusts; gifts to charity, including historical backgrounds, nature of charitable purposes and cy pres; powers and duties of the fiduciary; and remedies of beneficiaries in case of breach of duty.
2 Water Law / Singel, Wen.566D 001 97HF8V W/4:00pm-5:40pm 20 344 Final Paper, U
(Formerly DCL 372) The course will examine the two legal systems under which water rights in the United States are allocated: the riparian doctrine and the prior appropriation system. In addition, the course will consider Native American and other federal reserved water rights, the public trust doctrine and the interstate allocation of water. Finally, attention will be given to matters of particular regional interest, such as recreational access to water bodies and Great Lakes water issues. Two themes will shape the course: what factors led to the development of distinct water law doctrines and to what extent should environmental (quality) and public interest concerns be integrated into resource allocation schemes.
2 Wildlife Law / Bambery, Car.565B 001 97HE7P M/8:00am-9:40am 20 335 Final Paper,
(Formerly DCL 376) A study of how the legal system deals with wildlife issues. While some federal law will be considered, this course's primary focus will be at the state law level. It will review wildlife related laws from a variety of perspectives, including those that recognize sustainable use as a valid conservation tool, and regulated hunting as a component of conservation and sound wildlife management. A paper will be required.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Miscellaneous
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q 001 97HF54 Arranged 3 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q 002 97HF55 Arranged 2 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
1-2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q 003 97HF56 Arranged 2 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q 004 97HF57 Arranged 3 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
1 Appellate Competition / Copland, Jen.627Q 005 97HF58 Arranged 3 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Appellate Competition / Reifenberg, Jr., Joh.627Q 006 97HF59 Arranged 2 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Appellate Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of appellate practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Arbitration Competition / Bedikian, Mar.627P 001 97HGZT R/30:30pm-5:10pm 9 324 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Arbitration Competition Team. The course covers the mechanics of arbitration with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association advocacy competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy, and Trial Practice Institute: Trial Practicum Permission Only
2 Trial Competition / McNally, Ver.627R 001 97HGX2 Arranged 4 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Mock Trial Team. The course covers the mechanics of trial practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Trial Competition / McNally, Ver.627R 002 97HGX3 Arranged 4 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Mock Trial Team. The course covers the mechanics of trial practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
2 Trial Competition / McNally, Ver.627R 003 97HGX5 Arranged 4 No Exam, E P S
This is a performance and presentation-based course that serves as the intensive training component for the law school’s Mock Trial Team. The course covers the mechanics of trial practice with a focus on preparation for interscholastic or bar association competitions. Topics in the course include development of case theory, effective advocacy skills, and appropriate professional conduct. Students must complete at least 24 credits to be eligible for invitation to participate.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis, and Advocacy Permission Only
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Clinics
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
4 Chance at Childhood Clinic / Kozakiewicz, Jos.631F 001 97HE3S Arranged 7 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
The Clinic provides a setting for law and social work students to gain experience in child advocacy. The Clinic provides a forum for advocating for children, both in individual cases and through seeking to affect public policy and practice within the state of Michigan. Student teams will serve in a variety of roles to effectively advocate for children.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective,or Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspective and Advocacy
6 Civil Rights Clinic I / Manville, Dan.630X 001 97HE33 TR/1:30pm-3:10pm 6 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
Students will receive a versatile and well-rounded education in the intricacies of civil rights law and hone client management, case management, negotiation, and trial skills. Students will use their knowledge and skills to litigate civil rights cases in federal District Court (WD, MI) for their clients, prisoners who are incarcerated in Michigan and have asserted claims about the conditions of their confinement. Under the supervision of clinic faculty, students will represent their clients at all stages of these cases, including case development and strategy, discovery, motion practice, and trial. In addition to class times, students enrolled in this clinical program must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week NOTE: (1) Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for the application deadline). Preference will be given to students who commit to participate in the clinic for two semesters. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisite(s): All student clinicians enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic I must have successfully completed RWA and Advocacy. In addition, they must have successfully completed the first year (six credits) of the Law Colleges TPI program or must have successfully completed at least six credits in Evidence, Civil Trial Advocacy I, Civil Rights Seminar, Complex Civil Litigation, or Constitutional Law II.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
4 Civil Rights Clinic II / Manville, Dan.630Z 001 97HE35 TR/1:30pm-3:10pm 5 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
This is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Civil Rights Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling clients, managing a caseload, and litigating civil rights cases on their clients’ behalf in federal District Court. Typically, students who are enrolled in Civil Rights Clinic II assume a more in-depth role in their clients’ litigation. As in Civil Rights Clinic I, students further their experience under the supervision of clinic faculty and enhance their knowledge of civil rights law and trial practice. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 14 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student puts in an additional 12 to15 hours weekly). NOTE: (1) Enrollment in Civil Rights Clinic II is by invitation only. (2) Enrolled students may be required to attend a mandatory two-day clinic "boot camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Civil Rights Clinic I
5 Conflict Resolution Clinic I / Pappas, Bri.631D 001 97HE38 See notes 6 430 No Exam, E P S **
This clinic will focus on teaching students to be problem solvers which is a fundamental skill that lawyers need regardless of the work they do or the setting in which they do this work. The primary method of problem solving that the students will learn is mediation which is increasingly used by lawyers and sometimes mandated by courts, agencies, and organizations to resolve controversies. This course will provide an opportunity to learn the theory, skills, and professionalism issues associated with mediation and conflict resolution. Students will have opportunities to hone and enhance their learning by applying their skills to real problems presented by real people. By doing so, they will provide access to justice to people who would otherwise be unable to afford services. Professionalism and ethics will be an essential component of the program. Students will be expected to identify, research, and discuss the challenges that they are facing with an eye towards what kind of professional they want to become no matter where they work. They will not only look at the Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct for Lawyers and the Michigan Supreme Court Standards of Conduct for Mediators to inform their discussions, they will be expected to consider the cultural, economic, psychological, moral, policy, and personal implications of choices that they make. A key component of the clinic is to train students to be reflective practitioners who continue to learn from their experiences for the rest of their professional lives. The students will explicitly be taught to engage in meaningful reflection about their own work and the work of the other professionals with whom they come into contact. Enrollment is by permission only
Footnote(s): Clinic will meet Wednesday and Thursday afternoons and some Fridays. It is strongly recommended students successfully complete Mediation Advocacy and Civil Facilitative Mediator Training before applying for this clinic. Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis or Research, Writing and Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective; and Advocacy.
Var Conflict Resolution Clinic II / Pappas, Bri.631E 001 97HFKX Arranged 3 Clinic No Exam, E P S
A supplement to Conflict Resolution Clinic I, open to students who have successfully completed Conflict Resolution Clinic I, and who have been invited to participate for a second semester. Credits for this course will be accorded on a sliding scale of two to four credits.
Prerequisite(s): Conflict Resolution Clinic I
6 Food Law Clinic I / Patel, Jay.631M 001 97HE42 F/12:00pm-3:00pm 6 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
Students will provide legal services to nonprofits and low-income individuals working with food and agriculture. Students will develop an understanding of the issues confronting agriculture and food access in cities, including Detroit, Michigan.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis Advocacy
4 Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I / Costello, Nan.630T 001 97HE5C TR/8:30am-10:10am 11 344 No Exam, E P S **
The Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic has three components. Students will teach First Amendment workshops to faculty advisors and student journalists at Michigan high schools covering censorship, libel, and privacy issues, as well as copyright and libel matters involving Facebook and Internet postings. Students also will provide pro bono legal representation to high school and community college journalists whose free speech rights have been challenged. In addition, clinic students will conduct a Freedom of Information Act survey of school district regulations that govern First Amendment rights of student journalists. Students will receive targeted instruction on First Amendment press issues on a weekly basis. As workshop instructors, students will use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings. Students will be responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once they are approved by a Law College faculty member and a high school teacher. In addition to class time, students must work a minimum of 12 hours each week in representing pro bono clients and preparing First Amendment workshops. Some travel time to high schools may be required. Students are selected to participate through an application process. NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information. Prerequisites: RWA I and II; (successful completion of Media Law is preferred, but not required)
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
6 Housing Law Clinic I / Gilmore, Bri.630V 001 97HE5G TR/10:30am-12:10pm 11 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic I - LAW 630A) Housing Law Clinic I is a comprehensive housing clinic that will cover a variety of housing areas for students. Students will have the opportunity to master the basics of local landlord-tenant law, and to focus on how the clinic can best serve the community in the housing area based upon the overall needs of the community and the problems facing consumers with respect to their housing choices. Other areas of clinic development and student advocacy will entail, but will not be limited to, foreclosures, fair housing, affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness. Students can be expected to be assigned actual clients with housing problems and will, with supervision, act as legal counsel for these clients in a variety of settings. This will include advocacy in local housing courts and judicial tribunals in the state of Michigan. However, students will be mainly trained to be advocates, in and out of a judicial setting, with the overall goal to provide the student with a more expansive and well-rounded experience regarding housing law in a legal education setting. Students also will have the opportunity to consider other areas of housing advocacy where they might be able to have an impact on the lives of consumers, and will be supervised and supported in pursuing these goals on behalf of consumers. Enrollment in Housing Law Clinic I is by application only. Details about the application process will be provided to students in advance of each semester's enrollment period. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student works between 12-15 hours weekly in addition to instructional time). NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory orientation session that will likely take place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II,Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy
2 Human Trafficking Civil Litigation Clinic I / Totten, Mar.631P 001 97HFA3 Arranged 2 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
Students will get hands-on experience preparing and bringing a civil lawsuit on behalf of one or more victims of human trafficking. Students will participate in all aspects of civil litigation which, depending on the status of clinic cases, will vary each semester. Student are anticipated to participate in work that might include informal fact investigation, gathering evidence, conducting interviews, identifying clients, drafting memos on relevant legal issues, drafting pleadings, discovery, and motion practice.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis or Research, Writing and Analysis:: Criminal Law Perspective or Research, Writing and Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective or Research, Writing and Analysis: Social Justice Perspectives AND Advocacy
6 Immigration Law Clinic I / Thronson, Dav. & Thronson, Ver.630R 001 97HE5J F/10:00am-12:00am 11 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
Students engage with immigrant communities through direct client representation and systemic advocacy. The Immigration Law Clinic provides opportunities for students to experience the practice of law in a well-supervised and academically rigorous program that both prepares them for the practice of law and enables them to critically assess social justice issues. In addition to client representation and advocacy, students participate in a clinic seminar. Students are required to work an average of 20 hours per week. Enrollment is by application only (please see student announcements for details of application process).
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II or Research, Writing & Analysis, Advocacy
3 Indian Law Clinic I / Fletcher, Mat. & Fort, Kat.631J 001 97HE5N Arranged 7 No Exam, E P S **
This course provides students with the opportunity to work the environment of a small law firm dedicated to the practice of indigenous law. Students in the Clinic conduct legal research and write briefs for appellate cases, research legal matters for tribes, and develop policy papers for tribal governments and organizations.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Analysis Advocacy
4 Plea and Sentencing Clinic I / Smith, Chr.630P 001 97HE6K F/1:00pm-3:00pm 8 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
Plea and Sentencing Clinic I provides a framework in which students will assist with representation of indigent prisoner clients who currently have cases in which they are represented by the State Appellate Defender's Office ("SADO"), and who have issues relating to their sentencing or guilty pleas. Under the supervision of an attorney from SADO, students will interview and counsel with clients, isolate client issues, undertake intensive research relating to the identified issues, prepare legal memoranda, as well as motions and briefs for presentation in Michigan circuit courts, and argue those matters before the circuit court. Students will receive instruction on a variety of matters pertinent to their work, including the structure and overview of the legal system relating to pleas and sentences, plea and sentencing guidelines, client interview techniques, issue spotting and brief writing, and appellate strategy. In participating in this clinic, students will explore and develop fundamental skills and values essential to the ethical and competent practice of law. In addition to class time, enrolled students must work a minimum of 16 hours at the clinic or at SADO's downtown Lansing location each week (in general, each student likely can expect to expend 16 to 20 hours weekly in addition to class time). Some travel time to clients' locations or to circuit courts may be required, depending upon the cases assigned to the student. Students are selected to participate through an application process. NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Criminal Law, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
6 Tax Clinic I / Wease, Jos.630C 001 97HE63 MW/2:00pm-3:40pm 13 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
(Formerly DCL 476) Students enrolled in Tax Clinic I become "client ready" by representing clients with respect to a broad range of federal, state, and local tax controversies. Students advocate for their clients by working through a variety of administrative determinations, as well as by routinely participating in collection due process and Appeals hearings before the Internal Revenue Service and informal conferences before the Michigan Department of Treasury. In addition, they litigate cases in the United States Tax Court, the Michigan Tax Tribunal, the United States District Courts, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals, and Michigan appellate courts. Students also counsel ESL taxpayers about their rights and responsibilities under the Internal Revenue Code, and engage in numerous outreaches designed to educate the public about tax issues and requirements. All work takes place under the guidance and close supervision of experienced clinical faculty. Class sessions focus not only on substantive tax issues, but also on professional development, ethical considerations, policy matters, and client and case management. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours - in addition to class time - during the semester, and are expected to participate in a one-day orientati1n scheduled before the beginning of the semester.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): For students admitted before Fall 2011, Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II; for students admitted in Fall 2011 and later, Research, Writing & Analysis and Advocacy.
4 Tax Clinic II / Wease, Jos.630D 001 97HE64 Arranged 5 Clinic No Exam, E P S **
(Formerly DCL 515) Tax Clinic II is a continuing opportunity to students who have successfully completed coursework in Tax Clinic I to enable them to further refine their skills in counseling and representing clients, to take on more complex assignments, and to assist in mentoring Tax Clinic I students. Students must work a minimum of 196 hours during the semester.
Footnote(s): Enrollment by application only.
Prerequisite(s): Tax Clinic I
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Journals
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
Var International Law Review / Bean, Bru.629A 001 97HGYK Arranged 3 No Exam, P U
(Formerly Journal of International Law) Participation by writing competition upon satisfactory completion by day students of two full semesters and by evening students of three full semesters. Two credits of ungraded credit earned upon completion of a student article, a comment, required production work and participation in the organization of the International Law Symposium and the International Achievement Award Dinner.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
Var Journal of Business and Securities Law / Spoon, Ell.629D 001 97HG2R Arranged 1 No Exam, P U
The Journal of Business and Securities Law is an independent, student-run organization. Its purpose is to provide insight into legal issues surrounding the business community through legal analysis and other types of publications such as articles, personal narratives, and commentary. In furthering this purpose, the Journal accepts submissions written by active members of the legal community, faculty of established law schools, and other members of the legal profession. Additionally, the Journal accepts student contributions, including selected submissions from its Editorial Board and general members. The Journal anticipates a wide scope of topics on legal business issues such as corporate litigation, commercial transactions, employment, ecommerce, securities regulation, and any other topic focusing on the intersection of law and business. Prerequisites: Research, Writing & Advocacy I and II OR Research, Writing & Analysis, and Advocacy
Var Law Review / Barnhizer, Dan.628 001 97HF8S Arranged 66 No Exam, P U
(Formerly DCL 790) Prerequisites: RWA I and II, credits completed and GPA Participation is by invitation or writing competition upon satisfactory completion by full-time students of two full semesters and by part-time students of three full semesters. Four semester hours of ungraded credit earned upon successful completion of a casenote, a comment and all required production work.
Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

American Legal System - LL.M./M.J.
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Civil Litigation Practice and Procedure for Foreign Lawyers / Wittner, Nic.805 002 97HE3W W/2:00pm-3:40pm Institute section 6 324 12-21-2016 8:30 AM P **
This course explains the litigation process in the United States. It is designed to equip foreign-educated lawyers with the skills needed to manage lawsuits involving companies located abroad or subsidiary companies in the United States. The explanation includes (1) the jurisdiction of Unites States courts over lawsuits by or against these companies, (2) the procedures for filing or accepting a Complaint under the Hague Convention for the Service of Process Abroad and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure; (3) discovery under the Federal Rules, especially emerging requirements for electronic data, and the Hague Convention on the Taking of Evidence Abroad; (4) Rule 30(b)(6) requirements for testimony by corporate witnesses; (5) discovery sanctions; (6) trial procedures, particularly the use of company documents, witness testimony, and government investigations and recall orders as evidence; and, finally, appeal procedures. The fundamental practice skills involve selection of counsel; preparation of case budgets and management of legal fees; early evaluation of cases to decide if they should be tried or settled, and determining settlement values; negotiating settlements; mediating cases; collecting and producing documents and e-data; obtaining confidentiality agreements for proprietary information; preparing witnesses for deposition and trial, as well as at Congressional hearings (especially foreign company witnesses); and preparing for media requests, particularly during trial. These procedures and practice skills will come alive through the use of real-world examples. Students enrolled in this course are not eligible to enroll in International civil Litigation (548K) Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.
Footnote(s): Additional mandatory meeting time will be scheduled.
3 Civil Litigation Practice and Procedure for Foreign Lawyers / Wittner, Nic.805 001 97HE3V M/2:00pm-3:40pm LLM section. first class 8/26 see notes for details 25 324 12-21-2016 8:30 AM **
This course explains the litigation process in the United States. It is designed to equip foreign-educated lawyers with the skills needed to manage lawsuits involving companies located abroad or subsidiary companies in the United States. The explanation includes (1) the jurisdiction of Unites States courts over lawsuits by or against these companies, (2) the procedures for filing or accepting a Complaint under the Hague Convention for the Service of Process Abroad and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure; (3) discovery under the Federal Rules, especially emerging requirements for electronic data, and the Hague Convention on the Taking of Evidence Abroad; (4) Rule 30(b)(6) requirements for testimony by corporate witnesses; (5) discovery sanctions; (6) trial procedures, particularly the use of company documents, witness testimony, and government investigations and recall orders as evidence; and, finally, appeal procedures. The fundamental practice skills involve selection of counsel; preparation of case budgets and management of legal fees; early evaluation of cases to decide if they should be tried or settled, and determining settlement values; negotiating settlements; mediating cases; collecting and producing documents and e-data; obtaining confidentiality agreements for proprietary information; preparing witnesses for deposition and trial, as well as at Congressional hearings (especially foreign company witnesses); and preparing for media requests, particularly during trial. These procedures and practice skills will come alive through the use of real-world examples. Students enrolled in this course are not eligible to enroll in International civil Litigation (548K) Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.
Footnote(s): First class will be on Friday, August 26, 2016 10:00am-11:40am. Additional mandatory meeting times will be scheduled.
0 Foundations of Law / Jacobs, Mel.530K 004 97HE49 See notes 30 345 No Exam, P **
The primary focus of this course is to provide first-year students with an introduction to the study of law, with preliminary exposure to legal reasoning, the structure of the American legal system, and fundamental legal-theoretical concepts. This course also seeks to put students who come to the law from a variety of academic backgrounds on a more equal footing.
Footnote(s): Class will meet Monday-Thursday, August 22 -25, 2016 10:00am-12:00pm and 2:00pm-4:00pm each day.
3 Legal English I for Foreign Lawyers / Celeste, Mir. & Francis, Jer.804A 001 97HE54 TR/10:30am-11:45am 6 341 No Exam, P
Legal English I is designed to provide practice for foreign lawyers in the fundamental skills of written legal English and common law analysis in the United States. Students in Legal English I will draft a variety of legal documents and participate in a variety of oral exercises and presentations.
3 Negotiation for Foreign Educated Lawyers / Hartfield, Edw.805A 001 97HE6D F/1:30pm-4:00pm Institute students only 6 346 Take Home Exam, P
This course will provide an overview of fundamental concepts in negotiation theory and provide an opportunity to apply the theory in role plays and simulation exercises.
3 Negotiation for Foreign Educated Lawyers / Hartfield, Edw.805A 002 97HF8Z F/1:30pm-4:00pm This section for LLM students only 10 346 Take Home Exam,
This course will provide an overview of fundamental concepts in negotiation theory and provide an opportunity to apply the theory in role plays and simulation exercises.
3 Reading Comprehension Skills for Foreign Lawyers / Svec, Ter. & Wilson-Duffy, Car.804D 001 97HE6R MR/1:00pm-3:40pm 6 340 No Exam, P
This course will help prepare foreign LLM students for full time academic work in the areas of English reading, speaking, and writing, with primary focus given to reading strategies and comprehension. Students will work to build arguments, synthesize ideas, and develop persuasive essays skills. Students will respond to literature and synthesize written works to support their writing. Students will learn editing and revision techniques with the goal of making them more independent writers, will work to improve their understanding and use of English grammar, and will learn to recognize and correct their own writing errors. Students will use reading and writing to explore ideas, to challenge opinions, and to think critically.
3 Research, Writing & Advocacy: International LL.M. / O'Regan, Dap.804 001 97HE6U TR/10:30am-11:45am 10 325 No Exam, P
Designed to teach international LL.M. foreign lawyers fundamental skills necessary for legal reasoning, research, and written communication in the United States common law system. The course consists of two components: Research and Writing Seminar. The research component of is designed to introduce students to basic legal research concepts and sources. Sources covered will include: secondary sources, statutory law, case law, and administrative law. At the end of the course students will be able to perform basic research functions, in both print and electronic format, including how to determine that a source is complete and current and how to effectively use free electronic resources as an alternative to print and fee based electronic resources. The Writing Seminar component of the course begins with the Writing Skills Inventory, and ends with the Writing Proficiency Test. The topics covered on the Writing Proficiency Test are covered in the Writing Seminars taught by the Writing Specialist. The Writing Skills Inventory will help students identify the areas they must work on to pass the Proficiency Test. Unlike the Writing Skills Inventory, the Proficiency Test will use examples and language taken from legal writing. Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR

Global Food Law - LL.M./M.J.
Cr.Course Name / ProfessorCrse. #Sect. #Sect. IDDay/TimeLimitsRoomExam DetailsNotes
3 Animal Health, World Trade, and Food Safety / Haskell, Sco.810E 730 97HE3D Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 15 No Exam,
The objective of this online course is to familiarize students with the history, development and workings of the OIE, with particular emphasis on its role as the organization responsible for setting international standards for animal health and zoonoses, and attention to its new mandates for animal welfare and food safety.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Codex Alimentarius / Hegarty, P. .810F 730 97HE37 Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 10 Take Home Exam,
This course is to familiarize students with the history, development and workings of the Codex Alimentarius Commission in formulating and harmonizing food standards and ensuring their global implementation.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in Latin America / Lopez-Garica, Reb.810G 730 97HE43 Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 15 No Exam,
This online course is designed to introduce food industry professionals and university level students to food law and regulation as it is currently practiced in Latin America. Perspectives from regulatory, commercial and consumer interests will be taken into account. The events taking place in Latin America in food law and regulation will be linked, when appropriate, to the broader movements underway in other regions and on an international basis.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in the European Union / Jukes, Dav.810B 730 97HE44 Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 15 No Exam,
This online course enables students to study the factors influencing the development of food regulation in the EU. By making full use of the internet, students will gain access to relevant documentation in support of their professional needs and, having followed the course, students will be able to make an informed interpretation of the content.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Food Regulation in the U.S. / Fortin, Nea.810A 730 97HE45 Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 15 Take Home Exam,
An online course designed for anyone who must understand the legal and regulatory complexities of the regulation of food products in the United States including issues such as food and food safety regulation, regulatory compliance, HACCP, the regulation of genetic modifications, food additive regulation, food labeling, dietary supplements, the protection of the food supply, and the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
2 Foundations of Law and Legal Research / Domann, Bre.807A 730 97HE5A Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 15 No Exam,
This online course provides an introduction to the American legal system with a special focus on the research and writing needs of international scholars and non-lawyers (focus on American jurisprudence and Global Food Law).
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 International Food Laws and Regulations / Fortin, Nea.810D 730 97HE5U Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 15 Take Home Exam,
The objective of this online course is to provide the student with an overview of the systems of food regulation practiced in different regions of the world including some of the cultural and social-economic factors which influence the regulation of food products in the specific region including issues such as genetic modification, importation, exportation, food additives, and regulatory compliance.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Regulation of Agricultural Production & Marketing / Oldfield, Mic.810M 730 97HFEG Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 20 Take Home Exam,
This course highlights laws and regulations relevant to agricultural production and distribution of food. Focus is on understanding how laws and regulation influence what farmers raise, how they raise it and market it, and how that affects food quality and value. Topics include current and past methods of supporting production and profitability, agricultural production standards relevant to food products, including organics, and regulation of relationships between produces and buyers. 
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
3 Survey of Intellectual Property in Agriculture / Carter-Johnson, Jef.810N 730 97HE62 Online This class for students in the Global Food Law program only. 20 Take Home Exam,
This course is a survey of the intellectual property concepts that are important in the Agriculture Industry. Beginning with an introduction to intellectual property generally, the class will focus on utility patents, plant patents, and Plant Variety Act certificates, including international perspectives. Trade secrets and trademarks will also be discussed. Once students are grounded in the applicable intellectual property law, the class will turn its focus to the impact that intellectual property rights have on access to food products and food safety. No scientific or other class pre-requisites are required. 
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.
Top, A = Alternate Year, E = Experiential Learning, P = permission required, S = professional skills course, U = satisfies ULWR