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Course Descriptions

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Quantitative Analysis for Lawyers (3)
637E
Concentration(s):
This is an applied course designed to introduce student to various modes of quantitative thinking. The goals of this course are (1) to prepare students to be knowledgeable consumers of quantitative information as practicing lawyers and (2) to prepare students for technology infused law practice of the 21st Century. Course modules include (a) research design, (b) statistics in the courtroom, (c) introduction to probability and basic statistics, (d) data distributions, (e) statistical tests (f) regression analysis, (g) quantitative legal prediction and (h) a brief introduction to legal automation and the technology infused law practice of the present (and not so distant future).

Prerequisite(s): After taking this course, students may not take Analytical Methods for Lawyers-Statistics (509B), nor may they be taken concurrently.

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Reading Comprehension Skills for Foreign Lawyers (0)
804D
Concentration(s):
This course will help prepare foreign LLM students for full time academic work in the areas of English reading, speaking, and writing, with primary focus given to reading strategies and comprehension. Students will work to build arguments, synthesize ideas, and develop persuasive essays skills. Students will respond to literature and synthesize written works to support their writing. Students will learn editing and revision techniques with the goal of making them more independent writers, will work to improve their understanding and use of English grammar, and will learn to recognize and correct their own writing errors. Students will use reading and writing to explore ideas, to challenge opinions, and to think critically.
Prerequisite(s):

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Refugee and Asylum Law Seminar (2)
541U
Concentration(s):
This course will provide an overview of refugee and asylum law in the United States. It will explore the contours of the refugee definition and each element of an asylum claim by looking at statutes, regulations, treaties, and relevant case law. The course will compare the related protections of withholding of removal and relief under the Convention Against Torture. Finally, the course will discuss U.S. asylum procedure generally, and bars to asylum, both substantive and procedural.
Prerequisite(s):

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Regulating Environmental Risk (2)
566Q
Concentration(s):
This course examines regulatory responses to environmental and other risks to human life and health. It aims to familiarize students with the particular challenges regulators face in responding to such risks, and the spectrum of regulatory choices available to them. Topics to be covered include: Judicial v. administrative regulation of risk, risk assessment and risk management, direct and indirect regulation, cost-benefit analysis, the precautionary principle, and environmental justice. The course will analyze the range of policy, political, and legal-cultural factors behind current American approaches to the regulation of environmental risk.
Prerequisite(s):

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Regulation of Agricultural Production & Marketing (3)
810M
Concentration(s):
This course highlights laws and regulations relevant to agricultural production and distribution of food. Focus is on understanding how laws and regulation influence what farmers raise, how they raise it and market it, and how that affects food quality and value. Topics include current and past methods of supporting production and profitability, agricultural production standards relevant to food products, including organics, and regulation of relationships between produces and buyers.
Prerequisite(s): This course is restricted to students in the Global Food Law Program.

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Regulatory State (2)
530G
Concentration(s):
This course introduces students to the legal rules and principles governing the modern regulatory state, including statutory interpretation, justifications for regulation, how agencies implement their statutory mandates, and how courts review agency regulation and action. The course provides a foundation for upper-level courses in Legislation, Administrative Law, and a host of public law courses. Some sections of Regulatory State and Constitutional Law I are taught as a combined class.
Prerequisite(s):

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Remedies (2)
593D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 423)
This course provides an overview of the main types of remedies available in the American legal system following a determination of liability for violation of contract, tort, property, or constitutional law. The course will cover monetary damages, equitable relief, and examine the implications of choosing particular remedies, when such choice is available.
Prerequisite(s): Contracts, Contracts I

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Research, Writing & Advocacy: International LL.M. (3)
804
Concentration(s):
Designed to teach international LL.M. foreign lawyers fundamental skills necessary for legal reasoning, research, and written communication in the United States common law system. The course consists of two components: Research and Writing Seminar.

The research component of is designed to introduce students to basic legal research concepts and sources. Sources covered will include: secondary sources, statutory law, case law, and administrative law. At the end of the course students will be able to perform basic research functions, in both print and electronic format, including how to determine that a source is complete and current and how to effectively use free electronic resources as an alternative to print and fee based electronic resources.

The Writing Seminar component of the course begins with the Writing Skills Inventory, and ends with the Writing Proficiency Test. The topics covered on the Writing Proficiency Test are covered in the Writing Seminars taught by the Writing Specialist. The Writing Skills Inventory will help students identify the areas they must work on to pass the Proficiency Test. Unlike the Writing Skills Inventory, the Proficiency Test will use examples and language taken from legal writing. Open only to students enrolled in the LL.M. for Foreign-Educated Lawyers Program.

Prerequisite(s):

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Research, Writing & Analysis (2)
530D
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW500J)
Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter.
Prerequisite(s):

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Research, Writing & Analysis: Intellectual Property Perspective (2)
530E
Concentration(s):
(Formerly LAW500V)
Students begin by learning the basics of the U.S. court system, common law, case briefing and legal analysis. They are then taught the fundamentals of non-electronic legal research and writing through the assignment of problems geared to exercise their analytical and problem-solving abilities. Throughout the semester, students produce several legal research assignments, objective office memoranda and a client letter, with a focus on trademark, copyright and patent law
Prerequisite(s):

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Research, Writing & Analysis: Social Justice Perspectives (2)
530Q
Concentration(s):
This course covers the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, but the written projects focus around social justice issues. The topics of assignments may include, but are not limited to, any of the following areas of law: human rights issues, equal access to education and health care, child welfare, human trafficking, immigration, or issues surrounding the Native American community. The problems will give students an opportunity to reflect on what social justice means, and how we can utilize the justice system to achieve equity for marginalized populations. This course is for students who have an interest in social justice issues or who will likely seek positions with public interest organizations.
Prerequisite(s):

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Research, Writing & Analysis: Criminal Law Perspective (2)
530N
Concentration(s):
This course covers all the same curriculum as Research, Writing, and Analysis, however, all of the written projects, including a closed memorandum, a client letter, and a research memorandum, are placed in the setting of criminal litigation. This course is for students who have an interest in criminal law and/or wish to produce writing samples for a position with a prosecutor or public defender's office, with a private firm that handles criminal litigation, with a state or federal appellate court, or with a trial court that handles a criminal docket.
Prerequisite(s):

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Rule of Law and Jurisprudence (1)
579W
Concentration(s):
This course discusses Rule of Law concepts and surveys various views of law and the legal process. It also examines the judicial decision-making process and the social, political and moral contexts that influence and are influenced by judicial decisions.
Prerequisite(s):

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[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
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