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Course Descriptions

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Gender, Power, Law & Leadership (2)
541P
Concentration(s):
This seminar will expose students to various theories of leadership and their intersections with gender, power and law. The semester will begin with an analysis of power structures through a gendered lens, observing the operation of masculinism and feminism within those structures, especially as they pertain to leadership. It will identify the traits and characteristics associated with leadership and power, and observe the leadership across all sectors of the legal profession, and related professions, through analysis of recent benchmarking research. The seminar will focus on both personal and organizational leadership, examine the various double binds facing women leaders, identify barriers and obstacles that have impeded women's advancement into leadership positions, analyze the ways in which leadership is conveyed in culture (vis a vis the media), and ultimately explore how power, gender and leadership intersect and operate in the fields of and law and politics. This seminar will consider whether gender impacts judicial decision making and political candidacy. Students will also read a biography of their choice during the semester featuring a transformative leader. Throughout the semester, students will learn, through the readings and class discussions,about various characteristics of leaders and organizational dynamics, further aiding them in their entrance into the powerful profession of law.
Prerequisite(s):

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Global Law Colloquium (0)
545D
Concentration(s):
This course offers a broad overview of key, contemporary international legal issues which will be presented by JD and LL.M. students. Students will read and comment upon student papers and presentations. Students will be evaluated on their presentations and abstracts of their topic. Students participating in the Colloquium for 3 credits through a Directed Study will be evaluated primarily on their research paper.
Prerequisite(s):

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Global Perspectives on Education Law (2)
545E
Concentration(s):
This course addresses a specific topic within the broader topic of public international human rights law: education. Countries around the world as well as prominent international treaties and covenants recognize that children have a right to education. The potential benefits of education are many: arguably, it can support the development of stable government, reduce inequalities among groups of people, promote individual economic well-being, contribute to overall economic development of societies, and ultimately help enable countries to become more powerful on the global stage. Law is regularly used by nation-states and by regional and global international bodies as a lever to advance these goals. Thus, this course will consider a range of international and comparative legal and policy choices.
Prerequisite(s):

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Global Perspectives on Women in Law (3)
541Q
Concentration(s):
This seminar will consider international dimensions of gender and the legal profession, including an examination of history, employment trends, practices and demographics within all sectors of the profession (the judiciary, private practice, the corporate world, academia and public service). The seminar will explore explanations of inequality - like bias and stereotypes - and will consider other obstacles that have impeded the advancement of women in the profession across continents. Biographical material on transformative women lawyers will also be included.

Prerequisite(s):

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Global Risk Regulation - Food Focus (3)
810Q
Concentration(s):
As more and more citizens come to reap the benefits of open trade on a global scale, as well as extended lifespan and high quality of life, they also seem to expect public authorities to deliver more protection against those threats, whether industrial or natural. Amid contemporary preoccupations with risks, managing threats to society has become one of the central tasks of governments. Due to their inherent global dimension, risks today call for global governance solutions. This course focuses on societies' efforts to assess and manage food, health, safety and environmental risks, including selection of the risks deserving regulatory attention, scientific advice and decision-making situations of scientific uncertainty, the role of non-scientific values, calculating costs and benefits of regulation, and distributional and equity effects.
Prerequisite(s): Intended for students in the Global Food Law program

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Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I (4)
630T
Concentration(s):
The Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic has three components. Students will teach First Amendment workshops to faculty advisors and student journalists at Michigan high schools covering censorship, libel, and privacy issues, as well as copyright and libel matters involving Facebook and Internet postings. Students also will provide pro bono legal representation to high school and community college journalists whose free speech rights have been challenged. In addition, clinic students will conduct a Freedom of Information Act survey of school district regulations that govern First Amendment rights of student journalists. Students will receive targeted instruction on First Amendment press issues on a weekly basis. As workshop instructors, students will use interactive teaching methodologies such as small group exercises, role plays, and simulations of legal proceedings. Students will be responsible for developing lesson plans and executing those plans once they are approved by a Law College faculty member and a high school teacher. In addition to class time, students must work a minimum of 12 hours each week in representing pro bono clients and preparing First Amendment workshops. Some travel time to high schools may be required. Students are selected to participate through an application process. NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory two-day clinic "Boot Camp" that takes place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.
Prerequisites: RWA I and II; (successful completion of Media Law is preferred, but not required)


Prerequisite(s): Advocacy, Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II, Research, Writing & Analysis

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Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic II (0)
630U
Concentration(s):
course description forthcoming
Prerequisite(s): Great Lakes First Amendment Law Clinic I

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Health Care Fraud and Abuse (2)
558J
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 594)
The course will cover federal and state laws that impose criminal and civil penalties on health care providers for a variety of activities, ranging from payment for referrals to the submissions of false claims. The course would cover the federal and state illegal remuneration statutes, the federal civil monetary penalty and exclusion laws, the federal anti-referral (Stark) law, and the federal false claims laws as they apply to the health care industry.
Prerequisite(s):

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Health Care Law (2)
558C
Concentration(s):
(Formerly DCL 458)
THIS COURSE MAY BE OFFERED AS EITHER 2 OR 3 CREDITS.
Survey of major aspects of substantive health care law and regulation. Topics include: 1) Health care economics, including the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, health insurance, Medicare and Medicaid; 2) Health facility regulation, including quality assurance programs, licensing and Medicare-imposed operational requirements; 3) Health professional (practitioner) regulation, including board certification, licensure, medical staff credentialing and corporate practice of medicine; 4) Managed care, including organizational structures, regulation, contracting practices and vicarious liability; 5) Regulation of human subject research; 6) Personal autonomy, surrogate decisionmakers and death and dying; 7) Kickback, Fraud and Abuse and Stark II regulation of referral patterns; 8) Corporate structure and federal tax exemption of health care institutions. Medical malpractice and tort liability will not be emphasized. A final examination is required.
Prerequisite(s):

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Health Care Organization, Reimbursement and Regulation (2)
558U
Concentration(s):
Health care is not only a human need and a professional calling, it is also a large and complex component of the American economy. This course addresses health care as a business. While it will entail some overlap with the health care survey course and Health Care Fraud and Abuse, it will delve more deeply into topics that the survey course treated more summarily. Areas addressed include the forms of business organization and governance employed by institutional and professional health care providers, tax exempt health care organizations, employment of professionals, capital formation, reimbursement of providers by public and private systems, regulation under both police and spending powers, common health care business transactions, and relevant recent legislation. Professional and institutional liability in tort will not be emphasized.
Prerequisite(s):

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Hospitality Law (2)
605A
Concentration(s):
Students learn to identify and manage the legal issues raised by clients providing lodging, food, and alcohol to the public, with a focus on entrepreneurship and small business models, and particular attention to the intersection of local, state, and federal regulation. Topics would include choice of business form, duties to guests and others, food and alcohol regulation, lodging and land use regulation. The course will include several case studies requiring students to consider clients’ business plans and provide appropriate legal analysis and advice.
Prerequisite(s): Torts (Law 500R) and Contracts (Law 530B)

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Housing Law and the Public Interest (2)
603B
Concentration(s):
This is an introductory course that focuses on the significant laws, cases and policies formulated in the 21st century to address housing issues in the United States. The focus is on laws that were a response to economic, racial, and immigration issues and laws and policies designed to provide more access and opportunity to obtain safe, fair, and affordable housing. The course will examine legal and policy areas relating to housing and the problem of providing housing to the population in an effort to bring the issue of a society providing housing for its citizens full circle.
Prerequisite(s):

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Housing Law Clinic I (4)
630V
Concentration(s):
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic I - LAW 630A)

Housing Law Clinic I is a comprehensive housing clinic that will cover a variety of housing areas for students. Students will have the opportunity to master the basics of local landlord-tenant law, and to focus on how the clinic can best serve the community in the housing area based upon the overall needs of the community and the problems facing consumers with respect to their housing choices. Other areas of clinic development and student advocacy will entail, but will not be limited to, foreclosures, fair housing, affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness. Students can be expected to be assigned actual clients with housing problems and will, with supervision, act as legal counsel for these clients in a variety of settings. This will include advocacy in local housing courts and judicial tribunals in the state of Michigan. However, students will be mainly trained to be advocates, in and out of a judicial setting, with the overall goal to provide the student with a more expansive and well-rounded experience regarding housing law in a legal education setting. Students also will have the opportunity to consider other areas of housing advocacy where they might be able to have an impact on the lives of consumers, and will be supervised and supported in pursuing these goals on behalf of consumers.



Enrollment in Housing Law Clinic I is by application only. Details about the application process will be provided to students in advance of each semester's enrollment period. In addition to class times, students enrolled in clinical programs must work a minimum of 12 hours at the clinic each week (in general, each student works between 12-15 hours weekly in addition to instructional time). NOTE: Enrolled students must attend a mandatory orientation session that will likely take place on the Saturday and Sunday immediately before the first day of class. Please see the clinics' website for additional information.


Prerequisite(s): Research, Writing and Advocacy I, Research, Writing and Advocacy II,Research, Writing and Analysis, Advocacy

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Housing Law Clinic II (4)
630W
Concentration(s):
(Formerly Rental Housing Clinic II - LAW 630B)

Housing Law Clinic II provides an opportunity for students, upon approval of the supervising faculty, to continue work Housing Law Clinic. The selected students will be expected to provide support and work more independently than students enrolled in Housing Law Clinic I. Expectations are high and ongoing projects and cases that these students are engaged in will be a core responsibility.


Prerequisite(s): Housing Law Clinic I, Rental Housing Clinic I

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[A-B, C-D, E-F, G-H, I-J, K-L, M-N, O-P, Q-R, S-T, U-V, W-X, Y-Z]
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